Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Wind Mountain, Washington"
Includes ... Wind Mountain ... Collins Point ... Submerged Forest ...
Image, 2003, Wind Mountain, Washington, from Wind River, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain, Washington. Wind Mountain, Washington, as seen from the mouth of the Wind River. Image taken October 25, 2003.


Wind Mountain ...
The 1,903-foot-high Wind Mountain is located on the Washington shore of the Columbia River, at River Mile (RM) 156.5. Immediately downstream lies the mouth of the Wind River and the Washington community of Home Valley. Six miles downstream is Stevenson, Washington. Both communities provide good views of Wind Mountain. Upstream of Wind Mountain is the Collins Point Landslide. Across from Wind Mountain on the Oregon side of the Columbia lies Shellrock Mountain. Wind Mountain lies in T3N R8E.

Early Wind Mountain ...

Penny Postcard, Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Wind Mountain, Washington. Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Wind Mountain, Columbia River". Published by Benj. A. Gifford, The Dalles, Oregon, Made in Germany. Copyright 1908. Card #325. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Early Maps ...

1956 Map detail, Wind Mountain and Collins Creek, click to enlarge
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1911 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Map detail, showing Wind Mountain, Collins Creek, and Colllins, Washington. Original map 1:125,000 "Mount Hood and Vicinity, Oreg.-Wash.".


Wind Mountain in 1940 ...
From the Oregon State Archives "A 1940 Journey Across Oregon":

"... SHELL ROCK MOUNTAIN, 136.9 m. (2,068 alt.), is opposite WIND MOUNTAIN, which is in Washington. The Indians believed that the Great Spirit set the whirlwinds blowing in constant fury about Wind Mountain as a punishment to those who, breaking the taboo, had taught the white men how to snare salmon. ..."


Views ...

Image, 2003, Wind River towards Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain from across Wind River. Image taken October 25, 2003.
Image, 2005, Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain, Washington, as seen from Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2003, Shellrock Mountain, Oregon, and Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
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Shellrock Mountain, Oregon (left), and Wind Mountain, Washington (right). Image taken July 5, 2003.
Image, 2006, Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain, Washington, as seen from Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken October 2, 2006.
Image, 2005, Wind Mountain from Home Valley, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain, Washington, as seen from Home Valley. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Outcrop, Wind Mountain, click to enlarge
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Outcrop, Wind Mountain, Washington. View from just west of the Collins Point Landslide. Image taken February 26, 2005.
Image, 2005, Outcrop, Wind Mountain, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Outcrop, Wind Mountain, Washington. View from just west of the Collins Point Landslide. Image taken February 26, 2005.


Wind Mountain, etc.

  • Wind Mountain Geology ...
  • Wind Mountain and the "Submerged Forest" ...


Wind Mountain Geology ...
"Wind Mountain is one of several microdioritic intrusions in this area (e.g., Government Cove and Shellrock Mountain across the river in Oregon). Fragments of Columbia River basalt (xenoliths) have been found in almost all of these intrusives, inidicating that they are younger than the Columbia River basalt (specifically, Grande Ronde Basalt). Most geologists who have studied these intrusions believe that magma from them reached the surface and formed volcanic edifices that were subsequently removed by erosion. Also consider that we now know that the long-lived Bridal Veil channel (from approximately 14 to 2 m.y. ago) of the ancestral Columbia River lay only a mile or less south of these intrusions. Were these intrusions emplaced after the establishment of the Bridal Veil channel, and did volcanoes erupt close by? If this did take place, how did it affect the ancestral Columbia River? To date, we have not been able to find volcanic debris within the Troutdale Formation that we can conclusively say originated from volcanic vents associated with these intrusives. ... Another possibility is that these intrusions were emplaced prior to the time of establishment of the Bridal Veil channel, a period of approximately 15.5 to 14 m.y. ago. The age of these intruisons is a key question, and readiometric age determinations are needed to help unravel this problem.


Source:    Tolan, T.L., Beeson, M.H., and Vogt, B.F., 1984, Exploring the Neogene History of the Columbia River: Discussion and Geologic Field Trip Guide to the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon Geology,vol.46, no.9, September 1984, Published by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries.


Wind Mountain and the "Submerged Forest" ...
In the Columbia at the base of Wind Mountain use to be the "Submerged Forest", now covered by the waters of the Bonneville Reservoir. Lewis and Clark passed by Wind Mountain on October 30, 1805, and wrote:

"... Stumps of pine trees are in maney places are at Some distance in the river ...". [Clark, October 30, 1805]

This "Submerged Forest" disappeared in 1938 under the waters of the Bonneville Reservoir, the pool behind the Bonneville Dam.

[More]


Penny Postcard, Submerged Forest near Wind Mountain, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Submerged Forest in the Wind Mountain, Washington. Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1915-1930), "Wind Mountain and Submerged Forest, Columbia River". Published by Chas. S. Lipschuetz Company, Portland, Oregon, "American Art Post Card". Card #321. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Caption on back: "Wind Mountain and Submerged Forest are on the Washington side of the Columbia River, and plainly seen from the Columbia River Highway."
Image, 2004, Wind Mountain and Collins Point, Washington, from Starvation Creek, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wind Mountain and Collins Point, Washington. View from from Starvation Creek State Park, Oregon. Image taken September 24, 2004.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 30, 1805 ...




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • Oregon State Archives website, 2005, "A Journey Across Oregon in 1940";
  • Tolan, T.L., Beeson, M.H., and Vogt, B.F., 1984, :Exploring the Neogene History of the Columbia River: Discussion and Geologic Field Trip Guide to the Columbia River Gorge", Oregon Geology, vol.46, no.8, August 1984, and vol.46, no.9, September 1984, Published by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/wind_mountain.html
June 2012