Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"White Salmon, Washington"
Includes ... White Salmon ...
Image, 2011, White Salmon from Hood River, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
White Salmon, Washington, on the ridge, as seen from Hood River, Oregon. View from moving car. Image taken August 22, 2011.


White Salmon ...
The Washington community of White Salmon lies on the north side of the Columbia River at Columbia River Mile (RM) 170, on the ridge above the community of Bingen. White Salmon's early history is tied closely with Bingen's. Across the river is the Oregon community of Hood River. Three miles downstream is the mouth of the White Salmon River, after which the community was named.

Early White Salmon ...
The first settlers in the White Salmon area were E.S. and Mary Joslyn, who arrived in 1853 from Massachusetts. According to the "a2zgorge.info" website, their diary states that the name "White Salmon" was in common use at that time, and since the folks across the river named their community "Hood River" after the river, the folks at White Salmon did likewise.

According to "An Illustrated History of Klickitat, Yakima and Kittitas Counties ...":

"White Salmon, the town, is of recent origin, though the settlement is the oldest in the county, Erastus S. Joslyn and his wife having come to what is now known as the Byrkett ranch in 1852. However, the growth of the community was slow, largely due to the absence of transportation facilities. About 1868, as near as can be learned, the few settlers there obtained a postoffice, J.R. Warner becoming the first postmaster. He lived two and a half miles east of town, or at what is now Bingen Landing, then called Warner's Landing. The postoffice was maintained there, according to the statement of A.H. Jewett, a pioneer of the year 1874, until 1880, when Jacob H. Hunsaker established the community's pioneer store and succeeded Doublass Suksdorf as postmaster. Hunsaker built his store upon the site now occupied by C.M. Wolfard's store in the town of White Salmon, and with it the present town had its beginning."

Robert Hitchman wrote in "Place Names of Washington" (1985, Washington State Historical Society):

"White Salmon (T3N, R11E, Sec.19) ... Town on hillside above Columbia River's north bank, directly across from Hood River, Oregon, southwest Klickitat County. When a post office was established in 1872, it was named for White Salmon River, directly west. Rivalry with Bingen, a town directly adjoining White Salmon on the southeast and on Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway line, caused the station to be marked with both town names. Efforts to combine the towns have been made for many years, but so far have proven fruitless. In 1931, Bingen took the matter of naming the railway station to court, without satisfaction to either town."

Street scenes ...

Image, 2010, White Salmon street scene, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Street scene, White Salmon, Washington. View from moving car. Image taken June 5, 2010.
Image, 2010, White Salmon street scene, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Building mural, White Salmon, Washington. View from moving car. Image taken June 5, 2010.
Image, 2010, White Salmon street scene, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Building mural, White Salmon, Washington. View from moving car. Image taken August 11, 2010.
Image, 2010, White Salmon street scene, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Street scene, White Salmon, Washington. View from moving car. Image taken August 11, 2010.
Image, 2010, White Salmon street scene, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Street scene, Inn of the White Salmon, White Salmon, Washington. View from moving car. Image taken August 11, 2010.


White Salmon, etc.

  • Bluff Stairway ...
  • Eyrie Inn ...
  • Jewett Ave. ...
  • White Salmon Blockhouse ...
  • White Salmon River ...


Bluff Stairway ...
At one time a wooden stairway linked the two Washington communities of Bingen (below the bluff) and White Salmon (on top of the bluff).
[More]

Image, 2014, Bingen, Washington, click to enlarge
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Bluff Stairway trace between Bingen (at base of bluff) to White Salmon (on top of bluff), as seen from the Hood River Bridge. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Old stairway path is visible on the left and goes from red-roofed house down to the river, appearing here ending at the bridge/railing junction.
Image, 2011, Bingen, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bluff Stairway trace between Bingen (at base of bluff) to White Salmon (on top of bluff), as seen from the Hood River Bridge. Image taken February 2, 2011.
Old stairway path is visible on the left and goes from red-roofed house down to the river, appearing here just above and to the right of the road sign on the left.


Eyrie Inn ...
The "Eyrie Inn" (also known as "The Eyrie") was an early resort built on the Washington side of the Columbia River 1.5 miles west of White Salmon, and was built along the North Bank Road.

"Numerous resorts and inns may also be found but short distances off the highway [Columbia River Highway, Oregon] where the motor tourist may secure excellent accommodations. One of the most interesting of these is the Eyrie inn on the Washington side, and if the motorist is planning to extend his Columbia River highway tour by a ferry ride across the river and a trip along the Washington shore this may well be an objective. The inn is situated on the bluffs west of White Salmon, overlooking the Columbia river, at the mouth of the White Salmon river. The view is a striking one, including the Columbia gorge, the White Salmon valley, the entire broad valley of the Hood river and Mount Hood, as a fitting climax to the scene." ["Sunday Oregonian", July 31, 1921, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2020]

Sunday Oregonian, July 31, 1921
Click image to enlarge
"The Eyrie, On the Washington Bluffs". (White Salmon, Washington).
Source: "Sunday Oregonian", July 31, 1921, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2020.


Jewett Ave. ...

Jewett Avenue (today known as Jewett Blvd. or Washington Route 141) runs approximately east/west through the community of White Salmon and links the town to Bingen.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) database (2019) shows A.H. Jewett being granted title to 144.9 acres of parts of T3N R11E, Section 30, on February 10, 1882 (1862 Homestead EntryOriginal), and title to 160 acres of T3N R11E, Section 19, on June 15, 1892 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry).


Penny Postcard, White Salmon, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Jewett Ave., White Salmon, Washington. Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back, "Jewett Ave., White Salmon, Wash.". In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, White Salmon, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Jewett Ave., White Salmon, Washington. Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back, "Jewett Ave, White Salmon, Wash.". February 1, 1908 date written on the back. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


White Salmon Blockhouse ...
[More]


White Salmon River ...
The White Salmon River originates in south central Washington along the south slope of Mount Adams, and then flows south for 45 miles before entering the Columbia River (Bonneville Reservoir) at River Mile (RM) 167.5, at Underwood, Washington. The White Salmon River was named after the abundance of spawning salmon returning to the creek, whose flesh turned color from red to pinkish white. Upstream are the Washington communities of White Salmon (on the hill) and Bingen, Washington (at the base of the hill). Five miles downstream is located Drano Lake and the Little White Salmon River, where Lewis and Clark camped on October 29, 1805. Directly across from the White Salmon River is Hood River, Oregon.
[More]

Image, 2004, Mount Adams and the mouth of the White Salmon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
White Salmon River with Mount Adams. Mouth of the White Salmon River (bridge), Washington, as seen from Hood River, Oregon. Mount Adams is in the background. Image taken March 20, 2004.

"... pass the mouth of a large rapid Stream on the Stard. Side ... in this creek the Indians above take their fish, here we Saw Several canoes, which induced us to call this Canoe Creek it is 28 yards wide ..." [Clark, October 19, 1805]



"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 29, 1805 ...





Clark, April 14, 1806 ...




Columbia River GorgeReturn to
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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • "a2zgorge.info" website, 2005;
  • "An Illustrated History of Klickitat, Yakima and Kittitas Counties ...", 1904, Interstate Publishing Company;
  • Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2020;
  • Hitchman, R., 1985, "Place Names of Washington", Washington State Historical Society;
  • U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records database, 2019;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/white_salmon.html
July 2014