Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"'Wendy Rose', Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington"
Includes ... "Wendy Rose" ... Waterfront Renaissance Trail ... "Public Art in Vancouver" ...
Image, 2016, Columbia Shores, Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose" sculpture, Renaissance Trail at Columbia Shores, Washington. Image taken January 20, 2016.


"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail ...
"Wendy Rose" is a 10-foot tall and 5-foot wide stainless steel sculpture located along Vancouver's Waterfront Renaissance Trail.

According to the City of Vancouver's "Public Art In Vancouver" website (2012):

"... The Wendy Rose sculpture commemorates and honors all those who worked at the Kaiser Shipyards in Vancouver. ... The stainless steel sculpture is shown in work clothes proudly donning a red glass polka dot scarf. She is seen stepping from the home to the industrial work world and into the future, crossing the dam that powered the shipyards. Wendy is surrounded by other local symbols of the era which help celebrate the spirit and legacy of women of WWII. ..."

The sculture was designed and created by a group of local artists known as "Women Who Weld". The sculpture sits on land once part of the Kaiser Shipyards at Ryan Point.


Kaiser Shipyards ...
[More]
Image, 2016, Columbia Shores, Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
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Renaissance Trail at Columbia Shores, Washington, view looking west. Image taken January 20, 2016.

Once part of the Kaiser Shipyard, not-quite-finished ships lined up bow to stern along the shoreline "sea wall". The sculpture "Wendy Rose", a tribute to "Women in the Shipyards" is on the right.


Women in the Shipyards ...
"Women in the Shipyards"

"During World War II, the nation experienced an intense labor shortage as the demands of supplying troops and products grew. Women began to enter the work force in unprecedented numbers, especially those businesses directly supporting the war effort: shipyards, aircraft plants, and other defense industries. In this area, the main employer was Kaiser Shipyards, which offered good wages and steady shifts.

In 1941 the Bo's'n's Whistle newspaper stated that "shipbuilding would have stopped at the sight of a woman on the ways." Kaiser Shipyards employed only a few hundred women, all as office workers. By the next year, attitudes had drastically changed. Kaiser advertised for women welders, opening the door to the industrial workforce. By 1944, more than 10,000 women were working at the Vancouver yards, many as journeymen-level employees in a variety of trades. ...

Though women's roles were far more varied than welding ships and riviting aircraft, it was these duties which came to symbolize their contributions. Like "Rosie the Riveter", "Wendy the Welder" became an American icon commemorating wartime service. ...."


Source:   Information sign along Vancouver's Renaissance Trail, at sculpture "Wendy Rose".


Image, 2016, Columbia Shores, Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Women in the Shipyards" sign, Renaissance Trail at Columbia Shores, Washington. Wendy Rose Sculpture. Image taken January 20, 2016.


Views, 2014 ...

Image, 2014, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken January 4, 2014.
Image, 2014, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken January 4, 2014.
Image, 2014, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken January 4, 2014.
Image, 2014, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken January 4, 2014.


Vandalism, 2013 ...
"VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) A statue that was beheaded by vandals two months ago in Vancouver is whole again. Workers placed a new head Tuesday on the 10-foot tall Wendy Rose statue overlooking the Columbia River. The Columbian reports the original head and the vandals who took it in May have not been found. The Wendy Rose name is a reference to Rosie the Riveter, symbol of women who worked in shipyards in Vancouver and elsewhere during World War II. The statue stands along Vancouver's Waterfront Renaissance Trail."


Source:    "KOIN.com" website, 2013, information from "Columbian.com" and the Associated Press.

Views, 2011 ...

Image, 2011, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken December 31, 2011.
Image, 2011, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Wendy Rose", Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken December 31, 2011.
Image, 2011, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Detail, "Wendy Rose" sculpture, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken December 31, 2011.
Image, 2011, Wendy Rose, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Detail, "Wendy Rose" sculpture, Waterfront Renaissance Trail, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken December 31, 2011.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 4, 1805 ...




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • City of Vancouver website, 2012, "Public Art in Vancouver";


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/wendy_rose.html
January 2012