Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Washougal, Washington"
includes ... Washougal ... "La Prairie du The" ... "Tea Prairie" ... Parkersville ... Parker's Landing ... Parker's Landing Historical Park ... Simmon's Landing ... Washougal River ... Columbia River Dike Trail ... Cottonwood Beach ... Steamboat Landing ... Pendleton Woolen Mill ...
Image, 2004, Mount Hood from Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Washougal Marina, Washougal, Washington. Image taken December 27, 2004.


Washougal ...
Washougal, Washington, is located on the north bank of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 122. One mile downstream is the small community of Camas, three miles downstream is Lady Island and ten miles downstream is the city of Vancouver. One mile upstream of Washougal is Steamboat Landing, Cottonwood Beach, and Captain William Clark Park. Four miles upstream is Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The Washougal River enters the Columbia downstream of the community, at RM 121.

Lewis and Clark and Washougal ...
Lewis and Clark passed the location of today's Washougal on November 3, 1805, making note of the "prairie" where Washougal is today located, and suggesting it as a possible wintering-over place. Clark also mentions the Washougal River. The "qk Sand River" is Oregon's Sandy River.

"... Passed a Small Prarie on the Stard. Side above, a large Creek opposit qk Sand River on the Stard. Side, extensive bottoms and low hilley Countrey on each Side (good wintering Place) ..." [Clark, November 3, 1805, first draft]

"... on the Opposit Side of the Columbia a large Creek falls in above this Creek    on the Same Side is a Small prarie.    extensive low country on each Side thickly timbered. ..." [Clark, November 3, 1805]

In 1806, on their return trip, Lewis and Clark spent six nights at Cottonwood Beach, gathering provisions for their journey home.


"Tea Prairie" ...
Early fur traders called the Washougal area "La Prairie du The", or "Tea Prairie". The traders use to stop to pick a form of wild mint that became a substitute for tea.

"... We encamped at dusk about five miles above La Prairie du The, so called by the Canadians from a species of mint which grows in it, and which they are fond of using as a substitute for tea. ... " [Ross Cox, April 21, 1817, published 1832]

[More]


Early History ...
Alexander Ross camped in the Washougal vicinity on July 24, 1811 and referred to the location as "Wasough-ally Camp".

"... During this day, we passed the Namowit Village, Bellevue Point, Johnson's Island, and stayed for the night as Wasough-ally Camp, near Quicksand River, which enters the Columbia on the left. ..."

In 1838 Richard Ough (Howe) arrived in the area. Ough married the daughter of a local chief.

In 1844 the Washougal area was settled by George Bush and Michael Simmons and his wife. In April 1845 the Simmons son, Christopher Columbus Simmons, was born, making him the first American child born north of the Columbia River. In October 1845 Bush and the Simmons left the Washougal area and headed to Puget Sound.

In 1846 David C. Parker arrived via a wagon train party which rafted down the Columbia River from The Dalles, Oregon. Parker squatted on land just downstream (west) of today's Washougal. In 1850, with the coming of the Donation Land Claim system, Parker claimed the nearly 582 acres he occupied, and started the community of Parkersville, the first American town north of the Columbia River.

Other settlers followed David Parker. Joseph Gibbons arrived in 1847, Joseph Duncan in 1850, and J.E.C. Durgan in 1854.

In April 1849 pioneer Richard Ough "squatted" on public land on the upstream (east) side of Parker’s land, and in 1850 he claimed the 633.91 acres he occupied.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records website (2011) shows Richard Ough and Betsy Ough being granted title to 4.46 acres in T1N R3E Sections 12 and 13, on December 22, 1865 (1850 Oregon-Donation Act).

In 1880 Richard Ough sold twenty acres of his claim to Joseph E.C. Durgan and steamship captain and owner Lewis Love. These two men platted the town of Washougal, named after the Indian name for Rushing Water.


Washougal in 1887 ...
"The Oughs sold 20 acres to pioneer Joe E. Durgan and Capt. Lewis Love of the Calliope in 1880; Durgan and Love would found Washougal. The town started small but never looked back. In 1887, B Street amounted to Washougal Town Hall, Kersey's carpenter shop, Durgan's Store, Gary's Store, Fritz Braun's Park Hotel, Maple Grove and Barn, and a mud track to Steamboat Landing."


Source:    Richenda Fairhurst, 2006, Washougal, Arcadia Publishing.

Washougal in 1888 ...
"About a mile and a half above Parkersville and three miles above LaCamas stands the town of Washougal. This place makes a very pretty appearance as viewd [sic] from the river, and is situated on the north bank of the Columbia. The houses are all neatly painted and the gardens and yards are kept neat and clean. This town was laid out about 8 years ago on a plat of 20 acres secured from Mr. Ough by J.E.C. Durgan and Louis Love. It now has a population of 150 people. Its business consists of two general merchandise stores and a hotel with a bar-room attachment. The firm of Gary & Herzig occupy a fine building, and carry quite a complete stock of merchandise. H.H. Carpenter also carries a good stock of general merchandise. Fritz Braun, proprietor of the Hotel has been there ever since the town was started, and is well known to the traveling public. The Congregational denomination have built a neat little church where services are held on two Sundays of each month. Washougal is situated in the midst of a rich agricultural district, and seems to us must sometime be a place of considerable importance, though the people will have to wake up and let the world know where they are and how to find the town. They offer considerable inducements to the good blacksmith who will open a shop in the town."


Source:    "The Vancouver Independent", April 18, 1888, courtesy Clark County Historical Museum Newspaper Archives, 2015.

Washougal in 1941 ...
From "Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State", 1941, by the Washington State Historical Society, Federal Works Agency, Works Projects Administration (WPA):


"... WASHOUGAL (Ind. rushing water), 87.8 m. ... is at the mouth of Washougal River. Shady trees line the road into town, the main street of which is bordered by frame buildings. Houses are scattered over a wide area on both sides of the river. The town was settled on part of the donation claim of Betsy Ough, wife of Richard Ough, a Hudson's Bay Company employee. Mrs. Ough, an Indian of the Waunaisses tribe, was a trusted friend of the early white settlers on the Columbia River.

Washougal's major industrial plant is the WASHOUGAL WOOLEN MILLS, 1st and Main Streets (visitors Mon. to Fri. 8-4). The plant is housed in a large gray frame building, in the rear of which is a powerhouse. Fabrics of this mill are shipped to manufacturers throughout the United States. Many woolen novelties also are manufactured. Entire families, each member an expert weaver, are often employed; some come from New England mills, others from Europe.

West of Washougal US 830 crosses the Washougal River and spans the outlet of Lackamas Lake, formed by a powerdam backing up the waters of Lackamas Creek. Houses line both sides of the highway. The CROWN WILLAMETTE INN 89.9 m., is a hotel housing some of the employees of the paper mill in Camas. ..."



Street Scenes ...

Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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"Street scene", Washougal, Washington. Image taken March 25, 2016.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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"Street scene", LJC Feed, Washougal, Washington. Image taken March 25, 2016.


Washougal, etc.

  • Captain William Clark Park ...
  • Columbia River Dike Trail ...
  • Cottonwood Beach ...
  • Goodwin's Ferry ...
  • Hathaway Park ...
  • Marina Park ...
  • Mount Hood ...
  • Parkersville and Parker's Landing ...
  • Pendleton Woolen Mill ...
  • Reed Island ...
  • Reflection Plaza ...
  • Seaman ...
  • Simmon's Landing ...
  • Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge ...
  • Steamboat Landing ...
  • Two Rivers Heritage Museum ...
  • Washougal Marina ...
  • Washougal River ...
  • Washougal Waterfront Park ...


Captain William Clark Park ...
"Captain William Clark Park at Cottonwood Beach is located on property owned by the Port of Camas/Washougal. Clark Park, once known simply as "Cottonwood Beach," commemorates the historical site where the Corps of Discovery camped for six days while on their journey through this area in 1806. The 85-acre park includes walk paths, paved parking, picnic tables, covered cooking areas, a recognition plaza, three restroom buildings, and replicas of Chinookan canoes and Lewis and Clark's dugout canoes. A two-mile long dike trail at the north side of the Park and just above the Beach offers a scenic stretch for hiking, jogging, biking, and horseback riding."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

[More]

Image, 2012, Captain William Clark Park, click to enlarge
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Captain William Clark Park, Cottonwood Beach, Washington. Image taken September 11, 2012.
Image, 2005, Captain William Clark Park, click to enlarge
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Captain William Clark Park, Cottonwood Beach, Washington. Image taken August 27, 2005.


Columbia River Dike Trail ...
The Columbia River Dike Trail is located east of Washougal, Washington. It follows the Columbia River for 3 1/2 miles (2016 info), starting at Steamboat Landing, passing through Cottonwood Beach, and bordering the south side of the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The Trail allows running, bicycling, horseback riding, and leashed pets.
[More]

Image, 2009, Columbia River Dike Trail, click to enlarge
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Columbia River Dike Trail, Washington. Section near Steigerwald Lake NWR. Image taken August 2, 2009.


Cottonwood Beach ...
Between March 31st and April 6, 1806, Lewis and Clark camped on a prairie across from the Sandy River, at a spot which would become Washougal, Washington. Today this beach is known as Cottonwood Beach.
[More]

LEWIS AND CLARK
CAMPSITE

March 31 - April 6, 1806

"On their return to Missouri Lewis and Clark had planned to barter for food with the Indians. However, Natives in this area informed the explorers of a food shortage east of the mountains. They camped between here and the river and for six days hunted and dried elk, deer and bear. It was essential to have ample supply to last until they reached the Clearwater River of Idaho.

Also from this campsite Captain Clark, with an Indian guide, led a small party that discovered the Multnomah (Willamette) River and explroed it upstream a few miles."


Source:    Information sign, Cottonwood Beach, visited June 2003.


Image, 2012, Cottonwood Beach, Washougal, Washington, upstream, click to enlarge
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Cottonwood Beach, Washougal, Washington. Cottonwood Beach, looking downstream. Image taken September 11, 2012.
Image, 2003, Lewis and Clark Campsite Sign, Washougal, Washington, downstream, click to enlarge
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Lewis and Clark Campsite Sign, Washougal, Washington. Located at the Marina at Washougal. Image taken June 25, 2003.


Goodwin's Ferry ...
(to come)


Hathaway Park ...
Hathaway Park is a small community park located along the Washougal River at River Mile (RM) 3.5.

Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Hathaway Park, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Washougal River at Hathaway Park, looking downstream, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.


Marina Park ...
"Marina Park is located on the beautiful Columbia River, 5 miles east of Portland (river mile 121.7), the Port's Marina Park provides a wonderful view of Mt. Hood and the Marina. There is also a walking path, public restrooms, picnic tables, shade trees, and a deck overlooking the Marina. The facilities include picnic tables, handicap-accessible restrooms, a walking path, BBQ pits, groomed grass, and scenic views. There is also an RV waste station nearby for your convenience."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

Image, 2016, Marina Park, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Marina Park looking downstream, Washougal, Washington. Image taken November 6, 2016.


Mount Hood ...
Great views of Mount Hood, Oregon, can be seen from Washougal, Washington.

Image, 2016, Mount Hood, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Washington Highway 14, heading to Washougal, Washington. Image taken March 19, 2016.
Image, 2004, Mount Hood from Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Washougal Marina, Washougal, Washington. Image taken December 27, 2004.


Parkersville and Parker's Landing ...
In 1850, early setter David C. Parker took a Donation Land Claim on property just downstream of today's Washougal, Washington. Parker constructed a dock which he called Parker’s Landing. In 1854 Parker platted out the town of Parkersville, which consisted of a couple stores, a hotel, bar and a house. In 1879, Joseph Durgan, founder of Washougal, just upstream of Parkersville, bought the fairly new Carpenter store at Parkersville which included a post-office, and moved to its new location in Washougal. Fritz Braun, who had started building a hotel and bar also in Parkersville, moved his building near Durgan’s store. This location eliminated the wet land problems in the Parkersville area and low water times for ship docking. A roadway, bridge and new dock at Washougal gave Captain Love year-round docking facilities and provided local farmers a new way in and out to the world. Today, Parkersville is the location of the Washougal Marina, and Parkers Landing is now Parkers Landing Historical Park.

"Parker's Landing Historical Park may very well be sitting atop the birthplace of Washougal. It all began in 1845 when the first permanent white settler, David C. Parker, staked his claim amidst Chinook-speaking Native Americans and later called it Parkersville. Five years later (1850-1856) 50 settlers claimed land under the Donation Land Claim Act and that same year the Indian War resulted in a mass relocation of Native Americans to the Warm Springs Reservation. Over the next 20 years, several merchants would arrive in Parkersville and purchase over 20 acres of neighboring land, which would later be called Washougal. You can still visit the oldest incorporated community, now known as The Port of Camas/Washougal and Parker's Landing Historical Park. Launch your boat or go have a picnic under the harbor in the park. Enjoy the historical narratives in the kiosks or head off to a nearby trail."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

[More]


Image, 2004, Parkers Landing Historical Park sign, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Parkers Landing Historical Park, Washougal, Washington, sign. With "Corps of Discovery" member, Trader. Image taken November 21, 2004.
Image, 2004, Parkers Landing Historical Park, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Parkers Landing Historical Park, Washougal, Washington. Shelter area in the park. Image taken November 21, 2004.


Pendleton Woolen Mill ...
"Pendleton Woolen Mills has a factory in Washougal that weaves wool for Pendleton clothing. Pendleton has operated the mill since 1911 at this location. Tours of the plant are available. Pendleton also operates a factory outlet store at the site. The store is open Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pendleton Woolen Mills is located off State Highway 14 at the 15th Street exit in Washougal."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

Image, 2010, Pendleton Woolen Mill, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Pendleton Woolen Mill Outlet, Washougal, Washington. View of the Pendleton Mill outlet store, as seen from moving car on Washington Highway 14. Image taken November 2, 2010.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Pendleton Mill Store, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.


Reed Island ...
"Take a short boat trip down the Columbia River to Reed Island, an all-access state park, located 1 mile east of Washougal. Accessible only by boat, Reed Island features picnicking, camping, fishing, hiking, swimming, boating, water skiing, and bird watching. The island also features 10 primitive campsites. Launch your boat at the Port of Camas/Washougal -and take the family for a picnic, join your buddies for some water sports, or grab your fishing pole and binoculars for a little quality time with nature."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

[More]



Reflection Plaza ...
"Reflection Plaza is located at the center of Washougal’s downtown revitalization. It was completed in the summer of 2007, resulting in a refreshing design that compliments the trendy new downtown core. Already the stage for community activities, the continuance of surrounding buildings to develop and fill with tenants will fill the plaza with visitors year round. Reflection Plaza is located at 17th and B Street."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Reflection Plaza, Washougal, Washington. Image taken November 6, 2016.


Seaman ...
In 2015 Heather Soderberg-Greene's bronze of Seaman, Captain Meriwether Lewis's Newfoundland dog, was unveiled at Washougal's Reflection Plaza.
[More]

Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Seaman, Reflection Plaza, Washougal, Washington. Image taken November 6, 2016.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Seaman, Reflection Plaza, Washougal, Washington. Image taken November 6, 2016.


Simmon's Landing ...
Simmon's Landing was a landing located on the Washington side of the Columbia River at Columbia River Mile (RM) 115.5, immediately east of Fisher's Landing and west of Fisher Creek. Six miles upstream is the mouth of the Washougal River and further upstream are the communities of Camas and Washougal. TWO different "Simmons" have history in this area. Michael T. Simmons and William M. Simmons.
[More]


Steamboat Landing ...
Steamboat Landing located in Washougal, Washington, at Columbia River Mile (RM) 113. Steamboat landing began as a natural boat landing located about a mile downstream from Cottonwood Beach.

According to the Clark County, Washington, website (2014):

"... There's a natural boat landing that played an important role in the Oregon Trail about a mile downstream from Cottonwood Beach, next to the Port of Camas-Washougal marina in present-day Washougal.

Many pioneers coming out west would arrive near the Dalles, Oregon, and make rafts to float down the Columbia River. A natural eddy at the landing would wash barges and rafts up against the north bank. From there settlers could avoid the British at Fort Vancouver by traveling to the interior of what would become Washington state or cross the river to the Oregon bank.

Two men came out on a wagon train, floated down the river, and arrived at the landing in 1845. One was George Washington Bush, the first free African-American man to make a home in Washington. He would found a community near Tumwater.

The second man, David Clark Parker decided to stay put at the landing and took a Donation Land Claim in 1846 that became Parker's Landing, a thriving little community in its day. Other settlers who followed Parker included Joseph Gibbons in 1847, J. Duncan in 1850, and J.E.C. Durgan in 1854. ..."

Today a floating dock provides a panoramic view of the Columbia River Gorge, Cottonwood Beach, and Mount Hood. A two-mile Columbia River dike trail starts at Steamboat Landing and continues upstream to Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. The pilings visible are remains from the old paddlewheel boat dock which extend across the highway to the Pendleton Woolen Mill.

"Steamboat Landing at the intersection of SR 14 and 15th Street, provides pedestrian access to several points of interest. Visitors can stroll a boardwalk floating on the Columbia River that leads to an elevated observation deck with vast views of the River, Mt. Hood and Oregon. A peaceful wooded trail provides an alternate short cut to the deck. Visitors can also access the dike trail (used for walkers, bicycles and horses), which leads to Captain William Clark Park at Cotton Wood Beach, and views of the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

[More]


Image, 2003, Looking Steamboat Landing, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Steamboat Landing, Washougal, Washington. Image taken July 3, 2003.


Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge ...
"Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is located adjacent to Washougal, on 1,049 acres of former Columbia River floodplain, this diked area consists of shallow ponds, marshes, open fields, and riparian woodlands. While providing an important nesting and wintering area for raptors and waterfowl, it is also at a crossroads of migration routes. Birds that move east and west, through the nearly sea level break in the Cascade Mountains created by the Columbia Gorge, mingle with north/south migrant species. Over 200 species of birds have been recorded from this small area including such west-of-the-Cascades rarities as Prairie Falcon, Black-necked Stilt, American Avocet, Burrowing Owl, Loggerhead Shrike, and Sage Thrasher."


Source:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016.

[More]


Image, 2009, Steigerwald Lake NWR, click to enlarge
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Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Washougal, Washington. Image taken August 2, 2009.
Image, 2009, Steigerwald Lake NWR, click to enlarge
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Slough, Steigerwald Lake NWR, Washington. Image taken August 2, 2009.
Image, 2012, Steigerwald Lake NWR, click to enlarge
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Northern Harrier, Steigerwald Lake NWR, Washington. Image taken April 2, 2012.


Two Rivers Heritage Museum ...
[[More]

Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Two Rivers Heritage Museum, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Two Rivers Heritage Museum, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.
Image, 2016, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Two Rivers Heritage Museum, Washougal, Washington. Image taken September 8, 2016.


Washougal Marina ...
(to come)

Image, 2003, Washougal, Washington, click to enlarge
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Washougal Marina and Mount Hood, Washougal, Washington. Image taken July 3, 2003.


Washougal River ...
The Washougal River lies downstream of the community of Washougal. The river joins the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 121 at Camas, Washington, with its mouth hidden behind Lady Island. Camas and Washougal are located on the floodplain of the the Washougal River.
[More]

Image, 2004, Washougal River, downstream, click to enlarge
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Washougal River, looking downstream. Image taken November 21, 2004.


Washougal Waterfront Park ...
(to come)

Image, 2017, Washougal Waterfront Parks, downstream, click to enlarge
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Map, Washougal Waterfront Parks. Image taken January 31, 2017.
Image, 2017, Washougal Waterfront Parks, downstream, click to enlarge
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Walkway, Washougal Waterfront Park, Washougal, Washington. Image taken January 31, 2017.
Image, 2017, Washougal Waterfront Parks, downstream, click to enlarge
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Red-breasted Merganser, male, as seen from the Washougal Waterfront Park, Washougal, Washington. Columbia River. Image taken January 31, 2017.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 3, 1805 ...
The Fog So thick [typical of the Pacific Northwest in the fall and spring] this morning that we could not See a man 50 Steps off, this fog detained us untill 10 oClock at which time we Set out [from their camp at Rooster Rock], ...    I walked on the Sand beech Lard. Side, opposit the canoes as they passed allong. The under groth rushes, vines &c. in the bottoms too thick to pass through, at 3 miles I arrived at the enterance of a river [Sandy River] which appeared to Scatter over a Sand bar, the bottom of which I could See quite across and did not appear to be 4 Inches deep in any part; I attempted to wade this Stream and to my astonishment found the bottom a quick Sand, and impassable- I called to the Canoes to put to Shore, I got into the Canoe and landed below the mouth, & Capt Lewis and my Self walked up this river about 1˝ miles to examine this river which we found to be a verry Considerable Stream Dischargeing its waters through 2 Chanels which forms an Island [Sandy River Delta, which has had various names throughout history] of about 3 miles in length on the river and 1˝ miles wide, composed of Corse Sand which is thrown out of this quick Sand river Compressing the waters of the Columbia and throwing the whole Current of its waters against its Northern banks, within a Chanel of ˝ a mile wide, Several Small Islands 1 mile up this river, This Stream has much the appearance of the River Platt: roleing its quick Sands into the bottoms with great velocity after which it is divided into 2 Chanels by a large Sand bar before mentioned, the narrowest part of this River is 120 yards-on the Opposit Side of the Columbia a <large Creek> falls in [Washougal River]     above this Creek on the Same Side is a Small prarie [location of Washougal, Washington, Cottonwood Beach, now the home of Captain William Clark Park, and the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge]. extensive low country on each Side thickly timbered [low area upstream of Cottonwood Beach and Captain William Clark Park is the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge].

The Quick Sand river [Sandy River] appears to pass through the low countrey at the foot of those high range of mountains in a Southerly direction,- The large Creeks which fall into the Columbia on the Stard. Side [Washougal River] rise in the Same range of mountains to the N. N. E. and pass through Some ridgey land- A Mountain which we Suppose to be Mt. Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon] is S. 85° E about 47 miles distant from the mouth of quick sand river [Sandy River]     This mtn. is Covered with Snow and in the range of mountains which we have passed through and is of a Conical form but rugid- after takeing dinner at the mouth of this river [Sandy River]  we proceeded on passed the head of a Island [Lady Island] near the lard Side [???] back of which on the Same Side and near the head a large Creek falls in [Washougal River, today the town of Camas, Washington, lies between Lady Island and the Washougal River], and nearly opposit & 3 miles below the upper mouth of quick Sand river is the lower mouth, [for?] This Island [Lady Island] is 3 1/2 miles long, has rocks at the upper point, Some timber on the borders of this Island in the middle open and ponney. Some rugid rocks in the middle of the Stream opposit this Island.   <proceeded in> to Center of a large Island in the middle of the river which we call Dimond Isld. [Government Island] from its appearance, here we met 15 Indn men in 2 canoes from below, they informed us they Saw 3 vestles below &c. &c. we landed on the North Side of this Dimond Island and Encamped [on the north side of Government Island, perhaps opposite Fishers Landing],     Capt. L walked out with his gun on the Island, Sent out hunters & fowlers- below quick Sand River [Sandy River] the Countrey is low rich and thickly timbered on each Side of the river  [on the Oregon side this area is the eastern end of the Columbia Slough, located on the floodplain of the Willamette River with the Columbia River],   the Islands open & Some ponds river wide and emence numbers of fowls flying in every direction Such as Swan, geese, Brants, Cranes, Stalks, white guls, comerants & plevers &c. also great numbers of Sea Otter in the river [Harbor Seals] -     a Canoe arrived from the village below the last rapid ...     Capt Lewis borrowed a Small Canoe of those Indians & 4 men took her across to a Small lake in the Isld. [Government Island] ...    ...  :  note the mountain we Saw from near the forks proves to be Mount Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon]






Clark, March 31, 1806 ...
we Set out this morning [from their camp at "Jolie Prairie", today the location of Fort Vancouver and Pearson Airpark ... also in this area are Wintler Park and Ryan Point] and proceeded untill 8 oClock when we landed on the N. Side opposit one large House of the Shah-ha-la Nation near this house at the time we passed on the 4th of November last was Situated 25 houses, 24 of them were built of Straw & Covered with bark as before mentioned. those [of] that description are all distroyed, the one built of wood only remains and is inhabited [vicinity of today's Portland International Airport]. ...     at 10 A. M we proceeded on accompanied by one Canoe and three men, one of them appeared to be a man of Some note, ...     passed up on the N. Side of White brant Island [Lady Island] near the upper point of Which a Small river falls in about 80 yards wide and at this time discharges a great quantity of water [Washougal River]. the nativs inform us that this river is very Short and heads in the range of mountains to the N E of its enterance into the Columbia the nativs haveing no name which we could learn for this little river we Call it Seal river [Washougal River] from the great number of those Animals which frequents its mouth. this river forks into two nearly equal branches about 1 mile up and each branch is crouded with rapids & falls. we proceeded on about 2 miles above the enterance of this Seacalf river [Washougal River] and imedeately opposit the upper mouth of the quick Sand river [Sandy River] we formed a Camp in a Small Prarie on the North Side of the Columbia [Cottonwood Beach] where we intend to delay one or two days to make Some Selestial observations, to examine quick sand river [Sandy River], and kill Some meat to last us through the Western Mountains which Commences a fiew miles above us [Cascade Mountain Range] and runs in a N. N. W. & S. S. E. derection. The three Indians encamped near us and visited our fire we entered into a kind of a Conversation by signs, of the Country and Situation of the rivers. they informed us that Seal river [Washougal River] headed in the mountains at no great distance. quick Sand river [Sandy River] was Short only headed in Mt. Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon] which is in view and to which he pointed. this is a circumstance we did not expect as we had heretofore deemed a comsiderable river. Mount Hood bears East from this place and is distant from this place about 40 miles. this information if true will render it necessary to examine the river below on the South Side behind the image canoe [Hayden Island] and Wappato islands [Sauvie Island] for some river which must water the Country [Willamette River] weste of the western mountains to the Waters of California. The Columbia is at present on a Stand and we with dificuelty made 25 miles to day—.





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THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY
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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Camas-Washougal Chamber of Commerce website, 2016;    Clark County, Washington, website, 2014;    Clark County Historical Museum Newspapers, online archives, 2015;    Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority website, 2004;    Cox, Ross, 1832, Adventures on the Columbia River ..., J&J Harper publishers;    "Columbian.com" website, 2006, 2011, "History", "Names in Clark County";    U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records website, 2011;    Vancouver Audubon Society website, 2004;    Washington Secretary of State website, 2004, Washington History;    "Washington: A Guide to the Evergreen State", 1941, by the Washington State Historical Society, Federal Works Agency, Works Projects Administration (WPA);   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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February 2017