Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"'Boat of Discovery', Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington"
Includes ... Boat of Discovery ... Vancouver Monument ... Captain George Vancouver ... Lieutenant William Broughton ... Vancouver, Washington ...
Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Boat of Discovery", Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken April 1, 2007.


Vancouver Monument ...
In downtown Vancouver, Washington, on the northwest side of the Interstate 5 Bridge and at the foot of Columbia Street, lies a monument to Captain George Vancouver. In October 1792 Captain Vancouver's Lieutenant, William Broughton, sailed up the Columbia River as far as Point Vancouver, passing the location of today's Vancouver, and claimed the territory for the British Empire. Captain Vancouver believed that his Lieutenant was the first to journey up the Columbia River, as he considered the Lower Columbia River Estuary, as far as American Robert Gray traveled in May of 1792, only a bay.

"... "Having now passed the sand bank," says Mr. Broughton, "I landed for the purpose of taking our last bearings; a sandy point on the opposite shore bore S.80E., distant about 2 miles; this point terminating our view of the river, I named it after Captain Vancouver; it is situated in latitude 45o 27', longitude 237o 50'." ... Previously to his departure, however, he formally took possession of the river, and the country in its vicinity, in His Britannic Majesty's name, having every reason to believe, that the subjects of no other civilized nation or state had ever entered this river before; in this opinion he was confirmed by Mr. Gray's sketch, in which it does not appear that Mr. Gray either saw, or was ever within five leagues of, its entrance ..." [Vancouver/Broughton, October 30, 1792]

This monument to Captain Vancouver can be found along Vancouver's Waterfront Renaissance Trail.


Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Vancouver Monument and the Interstate 5 Bridge. Image taken April 1, 2007.
Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Boat of Discovery", Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken April 1, 2007.


"Boat of Discovery" ...
The Smithsonian Institution's "Art Inventory Catalogue" has Vancouver, Washington's "Vancouver Monument" listed as a sculpture titled "Boat of Discovery". The scupture is approximately 4 feet by 7 1/2 feet by 29 feet, with each base approximately 8 1/2 feet high and 16 to 27 inches wide.
"... The unclad keel of a long boat made of steel and painted red. It sits high over a walkway, and is supported by two pyramidal concrete bases with polished black granite facings, one under each end. The bases are on either side of the brick-walled walkway and the boat keel acts as an arch over it. The sculpture is placed in a plaza of sloping, rounded brick-topped walls. Set in one wall of the plaza is a series of three plaques. Starting at the top of the plaque on the proper right, a replica of the original charted map of the Columbia River continues across and down the other two plaques, to end near the bottom of the plaque on the proper left. ..."

The "Boat of Discovery" was created by artist, Jay Rood, and coincided with the bicentennial celebration of the exploration and naming of the Columbia River in 1792. The monument was dedicated on October 31, 1992.


Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Captain George Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken April 1, 2007.
Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Boat of Discovery", Captain George Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken April 1, 2007.
Image, 2007, Vancouver Monument, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Captain George Vancouver Monument, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken April 1, 2007.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 4, 1805 ...




Vancouver PlainsReturn to
Menu
 






*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • City of Vancouver, Washington, website, 2008;
  • Smithsonian Institution website, 2008, "Art Inventory Catalogue";


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/vancouver_monument.html
July 2008