Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Main Menu
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"The Dalles, Oregon"
Includes ... The Dalles ... Camp Drum ... Dalles City ... City of The Dalles ... Rock Fort ... Oregon Trail ... Tbe Dalles Bridge and Ferry ... The Dalles-Celilo Canal and Locks ... The Dalles Dam ... The Dalles Murals ... Barlow Road ... Chenoweth Creek ... Columbia Gorge Discovery Center ... Fort Dalles ... Indian Shaker Church and Gulick Homestead ... Lewis & Clark Festival Park ... Mill Creek ... Murals ... Old St. Peter's Landmark ... Seufert Brothers Cannery ... The Dalles and Sandy Wagon Road ... Umatilla House ... Union Street Underpass and The Dalles Riverfront Trail ... Waldron Bros. Drug Store ... National Register of Historical Places ... The Golden Age of Postcards ...
Image, 2004, The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood. The Dalles and Mount Hood as seen from Dallesport, Washington. Image taken April 24, 2004.


City of The Dalles ...
The City of The Dalles, Oregon, is located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 189.5, on the southern shore of the Columbia. Upstream of The Dalles is The Dalles Bridge and The Dalles Dam. Further upstream is the location of Celilo Falls, now under the waters of Lake Celilo, the reservoir behind The Dalles Dam. Downstream of The Dalles is Crates Point. The Dalles takes its name from the trecherous long stretch of rapids upstream, which were refered to as the "Dalles".

Mount Hood and The Dalles ...
Mount Hood, Oregon rises as a backdrop for The Dalles.

Image, 2005, The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Hood, Oregon, with the outskirts of The Dalles in the foreground. View from Washington State Highway 14, upstream of The Dalles. Image taken May 24, 2005.


Lewis and Clark and The Dalles - Rock Fort ...
Lewis and Clark spent 6 nights in the area of today's The Dalles, at a natural rock formation they called Rock Fort. On the upstream side of Rock Fort is Mill Creek which runs through the city.
[More]

Image, 2011, Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, Lewis and Clark campsite, Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken October 6, 2011.


"The Dalles" (the Rapids) ...
Early trappers were the first to apply the name "The Dalles" to an area of two rapids located at the "Big Eddy", just upstream of today's "City of The Dalles", and continuing to just downstream of the now-under-water Celilo Falls. Gabriel Franchere in 1814 was the first to record the name.

"... On the 12th, we arrived at a rapid called the Dalles: this is a channel cut by nature through the rocks, which are here almost perpendicular: the channel is from 150 to 300 feet wide, and about two miles long. The whole body of the river rushes through it, with great violence, and renders navigation impracticable. The portage occupied us till dusk. ... [Gabriel Franchere, April 12, 1814, Narrative]
Those rapids, also under the waters of Lake Celilo, were later known as "Long Narrows" and "Short Narrows", or "Fivemile Rapids" and "Tenmile Rapids".
[More]

View from airliner ...

Image, 2012, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles, Oregon, including The Dalles Bridge and The Dalles Dam (on right), as seen from airliner heading towards PDX. Mid afternoon, clouds, gray, and drizzle. Image taken April 24, 2012.


Early The Dalles (the City) ...
Lewis and Clark stayed twice in the locality of today's The Dalles. For three nights in October 1805 and for three nights in April 1806 the men camped on a rock formation overlooking the Columbia River which they called "Rock Fort".

In 1820 James Birney of the North West Company established a short-lived fur trading fort at The Dalles.

In 1838, the Methodists arrived and built a mission named "Wascopam", with Daniel Lee as the leader. The Wascopam Mission was abandoned in 1847 and sold to Dr. Marcus Whitman for $600.

"... After the Whitman Massacre, the property was returned to the Methodists. Neither the Whitmans nor the Methodists attempted to keep up the property, and emigrants of 1849 found the mission in ruins and decay. After Fort Dalles was built, the old mission was burned and the U.S. government paid $24,000 to the Methodists for title to the land. Various lawsuits proved that the Methodists had never obtained legal title to the property, and $23,000 was returned to claimants. ..." [End of the Oregon Trail Website, 2007]

The settlement at The Dalles increased in population in the mid 1800s when wagon trains arrive with new settlers on the "Oregon Trail". The Dalles was the end of the land road, with the rest of the journey to the Willamette Valley to be done by boat or raft. A protected harbor at the mouth of Chenowith Creek near Crates Point became the beginning of the water trail for the Oregon Trail travelers.

In 1845, Samuel K. Barlow and his family arrived in The Dalles. Barlow was instrumental in building a road around the south side of Mount Hood for Oregon Trail pioneers (see more Barlow Road below).

During the Cayuse War of 1847 to 1848, Major H.A.G. Lee, of the Provisional Government's Oregon Rifles, arrived in The Dalles. Lee built a stockade around the old mission buildings that became known as "Fort Lee" or "Fort Wascopam" In 1850, two rifle companies came from Fort Vancouver to establish a supply depot at the eastern end of the Barlow Road. Crude log buildings were constructed a short distance west of the old Wascopam mission and was called "Camp Drum". In 1853 the fort was redesignated as "Fort Dalles". In 1861, Fort Dalles was downgraded to a quartermaster's depot before being abandoned in 1867. Only the Surgeon's Quarters remains today, and currently houses the Fort Dalles Museum. The Fort Dalles Museum is the oldest historical museum in Oregon, being established in 1905. (See "The Golden Age of Postcards" below).

The first post office in The Dalles area was established on November 5, 1851, and called "Dalles". The Post Office's name was changed to "Wascopum" in September 1853. The community of The Dalles was incorporated in 1857 as "Dalles City". (One source, End of the Oregon Trail Website, says it was originally "Fort Dalles" and then changed to "Dalles City".) Common usage however kept the name as "The Dalles", and in March 1860 the Post Office became "The Dalles". On June 7, 1966, the "official name" of the city was changed to "City of The Dalles".


Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles, Oregon, as seen from the east. View from the Oregon side of the Columbia River, just east of The Dalles. Image taken June 4, 2011.


Oregon Trail - "Decision at The Dalles" ...
Until 1846, The Dalles marked the end of the overland travel on the Oregon Trail. At the mouth of Chenoweth Creek near Crates Point, emigrants embarked on steamboats, rafts, or canoes for the 83-mile journey down the Columbia River to Fort Vancouver. In 1846 the Barlow Road opened, giving Oregon Trail pioneers a decision - to journey down the Columbia River or to cross the mountains by going around the south side of Mount Hood. Neither option was easy. Rafts and livestock were difficult to maneuver along the river's swift currents and the Barlow Road's steep and rocky grades made travel dangerous for exhausted livestock.
[More]

Image, 2013, The Dalles mural, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural, "Decision at The Dalles", The Dalles, Oregon. Mural painted by Don Crook, 1992. Image taken May 8, 2013.
Image, 2013, The Dalles mural, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural detail, "Decision at The Dalles", The Dalles, Oregon. Mural painted by Don Crook, 1992. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Around The Dalles, etc.

  • The Dalles Bridge and Ferry ...
  • The Dalles - Celilo Canal and Locks ...
  • The Dalles Dam ...
  • Barlow Road ...
  • Black and White Restaurant ...
  • Chenoweth Creek ...
  • Columbia Gorge Discovery Center ...
  • Fish Bridge ...
  • Fort Dalles ...
  • Indian Shaker Church and Gulick Homestead ...
  • Lewis & Clark Festival Park ...
  • Lone Pine Tribal "In-lieu" Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
  • Mill Creek ...
  • Murals ...
  • Old St. Peter's Landmark ...
  • Seufert Brothers Cannery ...
  • Sorosis Park, Sorosis Point Overlook, and Veterans Memorial ...
  • The Dalles and Sandy Wagon Road ...
  • Umatilla House ...
  • Union Street Underpass and The Dalles Riverfront Trail ...
  • Waldron Bros. Drug Store ...

The Dalles Bridge and Ferry ...
Upstream of The Dalles is located The Dalles Bridge (U.S. 197), connecting Oregon's City of The Dalles with Washington State's Murdock and Dallesport. Between 1854 and 1953 this was the site of a ferry. Since 1953 a 3/4-mile-long bridge crosses the Columbia.
[More]

Image, 2011, The Dalles Bridge across the Columbia River, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles Bridge across the Columbia River. View from the Oregon side of the Columbia River. Image taken June 4, 2011.


The Dalles - Celilo Canal and Locks ...
The The Dalles - Celilo Canal was completed in 1915, creating a steamboat waterway around the Fivemile Rapids ("Long Narrows"), Tenmile Rapids ("Short Narrows"), and Celilo Falls. It provided a clear journey to Lewiston, Idaho. The canal was 8.6 miles long with it's lower end located 3.3 miles above The Dalles. The end of the canal came with construction of The Dalles Dam and Locks.
[More]

The Dalles Dam ...
The Dalles Dam is located in the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 191.5, at the foot of the (now flooded) "Short Narrows" or "Fivemile Rapids". Two miles downstream from the Dam is Rock Fort, Lewis and Clark's campsite of October 25-27, 1805 and again April 15-17, 1806. Also downstream is Oregon's City of The Dalles. One mile upstream is Spearfish Lake, where Lewis and Clark spent the night of April 18, 1806.
[More]

Image, 2011, The Dalles Dam, from the Oregon side, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles Dam. View from hills above The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken June 4, 2011.


Barlow Road ...
In 1845, Samuel K. Barlow and his family arrived in The Dalles, a stopping place on their journey to the Willamette Valley.

"... finding no boats readily available at such a late date, set off to scout the route of what would become the Barlow Road around the south shoulder of Mount Hood. Sam Barlow's road, originally called the Mount Hood Toll Road, began at what is now Third Street in The Dalles. With the Barlow Road open, it was no longer necessary to abandon the overland trail for crude rafts or overpriced HBC bateaux. Later travelers bypassed The Dalles entirely, leaving the Oregon Trail ten miles east to cut south to Barlow's route. Still, the Barlow Road had its own dangers, and about one in every four emigrants would opt for the water route even after the Barlow Road was opened in 1846. ..." [End of the Oregon Trail website, 2007]

[More]


Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, "Barlow Road Route", The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken September 28, 2011.


Black and White Restaurant, "Roadhouse Respite" ...
The Black and White Restaurant, located in The Dalles, Oregon, contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to be an "official station" for Columbia River Highway travelers.

"... Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete. ..." [Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013]

Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Chenoweth Creek ...
Chenoweth Creek rises in the hills west of The Dalles and merges with the Columbia River at Columbia River Mile (RM) 187, approximately two miles southeast of Crates Point. Upstream of Chenoweth Creek is Rock Fort, Mill Creek, and The Dalles. Downstream is Crates Point and Squally Point. Before the opening of the Barlow Road in 1846, Oregon Trail pioneers launched their rafts at Chenoweth Creek for their final leg of their long journey.
[More]

Image, 2013, Chenoweth Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Chenoweth Creek looking downstream, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Columbia Gorge Discovery Center ...
The Columbia Gorge Discovery Center is located in The Dalles, Oregon, just east of Crates Point.
[More]

Image, 2005, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken June 4, 2005.
Image, 2005, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Covered Wagon, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken June 4, 2005.


Fish Bridge ...

Image, 2006, The Dalles Fish Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles "Fish Bridge". View looking west. Image taken October 2, 2006.
Image, 2013, The Dalles Fish Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles "Fish Bridge". View looking east while crossing the bridge. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Fort Dalles ...
During the Cayuse War of 1847 to 1848, Major H.A.G. Lee, of the Provisional Government's Oregon Rifles, arrived in The Dalles. Lee built a stockade around the old mission buildings that became known as "Fort Lee" or "Fort Wascopam" In 1850, two rifle companies came from Fort Vancouver to establish a supply depot at the eastern end of the Barlow Road. Crude log buildings were constructed a short distance west of the old Wascopam mission and was called "Camp Drum". In 1853 the fort was redesignated as "Fort Dalles". In 1861, Fort Dalles was downgraded to a quartermaster's depot before being abandoned in 1867. Only the Surgeon's Quarters remains today, and currently houses the Fort Dalles Museum. The Fort Dalles Museum is the oldest historical museum in Oregon, being established in 1905. In 1971 the Fort Dalles Surgeon's Quarters was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
[More]

Image, 2012, Fort Dalles, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Surgeons Quarters, Fort Dalles, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken May 29, 2012.


Indian Shaker Church and Gulick Homestead ...
On the upstream side of the The Dalles Bridge lies the Indian Shaker Church and the Gulick Homestead. Built in the late 1890s, the historic buildings stand along the Columbia River. In 1978 the Indian Shaker Church and the Gulick Homestead were added to the National Register of Historic Places (Event #78003087).
[More]

Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Buildings, Gulick Homestead, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken October 6, 2011.


Lewis & Clark Festival Park ...
The Dalles' new Lewis & Clark Festival Park was dedicated in 2012. The park is at the location of where once stood the Umatilla House, one of the finest hotels in early The Dalles.

Image, 2013, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Lewis & Clark Festival Park, The Dalles, Oregon. The Lewis & Clark Festival Park is the green area in the middle ground. The location was once the location of the historic Umatilla House. View from car on Highway 84. Image taken June 5, 2013.


Lone Pine Tribal "In-lieu" Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
All four Columbia River treaty tribes enjoy fishing rights along the Columbia from the Bonneville to McNary dams. This 147-mile stretch of the river is called Zone 6. The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) operates and maintains 31 fishing sites (2015, Note: the website map only shows 30 sites) in Zone 6. These sites were set aside by Congress to provide fishing locations to Indian fishers whose traditional fishing grounds were inundated behind dams.

"For fisheries management purposes, the 292-mile stretch of the Columbia River that creates the border between Washington and Oregon is divided into six zones. Zones 1-5 are between the mouth of the river and Bonneville Dam, a distance of 145 miles. Oregon and Washington manage the commercial fisheries that occur in these zones. Zone 6 is an exclusive treaty Indian commercial fishing area. This exclusion is for commercial fishing only. Non-commercial sports fishers may still fish in this stretch of the river." [Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016]

The Zone 6 sites include 19 Treaty Fishing Access sites (Bonneville, Wyeth, White Salmon, Stanley Rock, Lyle, Dallesport, Celilo, Maryhill, Rufus, Preacher's Eddy, North Shore, LePage Park, Pasture Point, Roosevelt Park, Pine Creek, Threemile Canyon, Alderdale, Crow Butte, and Faler Road), five "In-lieu" sites (Cascade Locks, Wind River, Cooks, Underwood, and Lone Pine), two "Shared-use" sites (Avery and Sundale Park, for both Tribal use and Public use), and four "Unimproved" sites with no services (Goodnoe, Rock Creek, Moonay, and Aldercreek).



Mill Creek ...
Rock Fort, a Lewis and Clark campsite in both 1805 and 1806, was located just west of Mill Creek at The Dalles, Oregon. Lewis and Clark called the creek "Que-nett Creek". Downstream of Mill Creek is Chenoweth Creek and upstream is Fifteenmile Creek. Chenoweth Creek is where Oregon Trail travelers would group before building rafts and floating down the Columbia River.
[More]

Image, 2013, Mill Creek, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mill Creek, The Dalles, Oregon, looking downstream from the 6th Street bridge. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Murals ...
The Dalles, Oregon, is noted for its many murals around town, many of them depicting the history of The Dalles, and some of them just advertising local businesses.
[More]

Image, 2013, The Dalles mural, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural, "Corps of Discovery: Into the Narrows", The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken February 8, 2013.
Image, 2013, The Dalles mural, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural, "The Dalles, Northwest Trading Center for 10,000 Years", The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken May 8, 2013.
Image, 2013, The Dalles mural, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural detail, "Celilo/Wyam - The Great Falls on the Columbia", The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken May 8, 2013.


Old St. Peter's Landmark ...
The St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church was built in 1897, dedicated in 1898, and used until 1969. It is one of the finest Gothic Revival structures in The Dalles. The church was saved from demolition in 1971 and has been renovated. Now called the "Old St. Peter's Landmark", the church is open the to the public as a museum and a wedding chapel. In 1974 the St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Building, #74001720)

Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Old St. Peter's Landmark. Image taken from moving car. Image taken January 30, 2011.
Image, 2013, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Old St. Peter's Landmark as seen from above. View from West Scenic Drive. Image taken April 22, 2013.


Seufert Brothers Cannery ...
The "Seufert Bros. Co." was established in The Dalles in 1881 by brothers Francis Anthony and Theordore Seufert. This enterprise became one of the largest salmon fishing and processing establishments on the Columbia River. The brothers owned the majority of of the fish wheels surrounding The Dalles, and their cannery was located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 192, just upstream of today's The Dalles Dam. The Cannery building burned in 1973. Today all that remains of the Cannery is a remnant stone wall near The Dalles Dam's visitor center, and a fish wheel foundation near the river.
[More]

Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Seufert Brothers Cannery remains, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken October 6, 2011.


Sorosis Park, Sorosis Point Overlook, and Veterans Memorial ...
(to come)


"The Dalles and Sandy Wagon Road" ...
   ... and the Joel Palmer Cattle Trail ...
[More]

Umatilla House ...
Built in 1857 and demolished in 1929, the Umatilla House was known as the "best hotel west of Minneapolis and north of San Francisco". It was located in The Dalles, Oregon, on the northeast corner of First ("Main") and Union streets, right across from the steamboat landing. Today this is the location for The Dalles' "Lewis & Clark Festival Park".
[More]

Image, 2013, Mural, Umatilla House, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mural, "Umatilla House", The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken April 22, 2013.
Image, 2012, Fort Dalles, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Dalles to Prineville "N.P. Express" stage coach/mail wagon, and the 1870s Umatilla House omnibus, Fort Dalles Historic Vehicle Collection, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken May 29, 2012.


Union Street Underpass and The Dalles Riverfront Trail ...
The Union Street Underpass connects downtown The Dalles to the Columbia River, allowing town access to the Riverfront Trail. The Riverfront Trail is a scenic 7.4 mile long asphalt trail bordering the Columbia River, extending from the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center parking lot (west) to the Riverfront Park (east).

Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Union Street Underpass and the Riverfront Trail, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken October 6, 2011.


Waldron Bros. Drug Store ...
The Waldron Bros. Drug Store (also known as the Gitchell Building) was built around 1867 by pharmacists Henry J. and George W. Waldron. Stone mason Henry Clint is reported to have constructed the building. The Waldron brothers used it as a drug store with offices above, and when Henry Waldon served as Postmaster, the Post Office was also located here. Throughout its many years the building has also served as home to other businesses, including the Wasco Lodge, the "The Weekly Mountaineer" newspaper, and the law office of Judge Joseph Wilson. The building survived the fire of 1891 and the "Great Flood of 1894". Between 1923 to about 1938 the Gitchell family owned the building and renovated it as apartments. It is currently owned by the City of The Dalles. The building is part of the "The Dalles Commerical Historic District", listed in 1986 on the National Register of Historic Places (District #86002953).

Image, 2013, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Waldron Drug Store, The Dalles, Oregon. Front view as seen from car on First Street. Image taken May 8, 2013.
Image, 2013, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Waldron Drug Store, The Dalles, Oregon. Back view as seen from car on Highway 84. Image taken June 5, 2013.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.

Penny Postcard, Looking up the Columbia River from The Dalles, ca.1910
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Looking up the Columbia River from The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1910. Penny Postcard, ca.1910, "Looking up the Columbia River, from the Dalles, Oregon.". Published by The Portland Post Card Company, Portland, Oregon. Made in Germany. Card #6033. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Old Fort Dalles, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Old Fort Dalles, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1920 Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Old Fort Dalles, Oregon". Part of the "Ezra Meeker Historical Post Cards for School, Libraries, the Home, and Collections." Each series contains 16 post card views with Historical Sketches on reverse side. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

Caption on back reads: "In this encampment (called a fort) in the early fifties Grant, Sherman and Sheridan all had their earlier experiences in military life and Indian warfare. Here also lay sick almost to death that delightful writer, Theodore Winthrop, whose untimely death came so early in the War of the Rebellion. The Dalles proper of the Columbia River is a few miles up river way, where the river is turned on edge through the narrow gap of less than one hundred feet in width, with a channel said to be half a mile in depth. The stretch of river shown in the background is more than a mile in width of placid water, which continues through the great gap of the Cascade Mountains to the Cascade Falls below."

The building on the far right was the "Guard House". More image of it can be seen at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles, Oregon.

Penny Postcard, Old Fort Dalles, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Officer's House, Old Fort Dalles, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1920 Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1910, "Old U.S. Army Post near The Dalles, Oregon.". Building is former "Officer's House", now an Oregon Museum. The "Officer's House" is the oldest history museaum in Oregon. The house was built in 1856. Published by Portland Post Card Co., Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington. Made in Germany. Card #70543. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1909
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1909 Penny Postcard, Dated 1909, "Seufert Brothers Col, Salmon Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, The Dalles in the Distance.". Mount Hood, Oregon, is on the left. Published by The Portland Post Card Company, Portland, Oregon. Card #6027. Hand-written message on card is dated January 3, 1909. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Seining for Salmon near The Dalles, ca.1910
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Seining for Salmon near The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1910. Penny Postcard, ca.1910, "Seining Salmon, near The Dalles, Oregon.". Published by Benj. A. Gifford, The Dalles, Oregon. Made in Germany. Card #265. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Seining for Salmon near The Dalles, ca.1910
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Seining for Salmon near The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1910. Penny Postcard, ca.1910, "Seining Crew Hauling Seine Columbia River.". Published by Pacific Novelty Co., San Francisco. Made in Great Britain. Card #928. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Mount Hood from The Dalles, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Mount Hood from The Dalles, ca.1920 Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Mount Hood as seen from bank of the Columbia River near The Dalles, Ore.". A.M. Prentiss Photo. Published by Lipschuetz and Katz, Portland, Oregon. Card #447. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 25, 1805 ...
a cool morning [their camp was near Horsethief Butte] Capt Lewis and my Self walked down to See the place the Indians pointed out as the worst place in passing through the gut, which we found difficuelt of passing without great danger, but as the portage was impractiable with our large Canoes, we Concluded to Make a portage of our most valuable articles and run the canoes thro accordingly on our return divided the party Some to take over the Canoes, and others to take our Stores across a portage of a mile to a place on the Chanel below this bad whorl & Suck, with Some others I had fixed on the Chanel with roapes to throw out to any who Should unfortunately meet with difficuelty in passing through; great number of Indians viewing us from the high rocks under which we had to pass, the 3 first Canoes passed thro very well, the 4th nearly filled with water, the last passed through by takeing in a little water, <we> thus Safely below what I conceved to be the worst part of this Chanel, felt my Self extreamly gratified and pleased. we loaded the Canoes & Set out, and had not proceeded, more than two mile before the unfortunate Canoe which filled crossing the bad place above, run against a rock and was in great danger of being lost, This Chanel is through a hard rough black rock, from 50100 yards wide. Swelling and boiling in a most tremendious maner Several places on which the Indians inform me they take the Salmon as fast as they wish; we passed through a deep bason to the stard Side ["Big Eddy", today Spearfish Lake] of 1 mile below which the River narrows and divided by a rock The Curent we found quit jentle, ...    we landed ...     we proceeded on down the water fine, rocks in every derection for a fiew miles when the river widens and becoms a butifull jentle Stream of about half a mile wide, Great numbers of the Sea Orter [Harbor Seals] about those narrows and both below and above. we Came too, under a high point of rocks on the Lard. Side below a creek [Mill Creek] of 20 yards wide and much water, as it was necessary to make Some Selestial observations we formed our Camp on the top of a high point of rocks [Rock Fort], which forms a kind of <artif> fortification in the Point between the river & Creek [Mill Creek], with a boat guard, this Situation we Concieve well Calculated for defence, and Conveniant to hunt under the foots of the mountain to the West & S. W. where timber of different kinds grows, and appears to be handsom Coverts for the Deer, in oke woods, ...   

This litle Creek [Mill Creek] heads in the range of mountains which run S S W & N W for a long distance on which is Scattering pine white Oake &c. The Pinical of the round toped mountain which we Saw a Short distance below the forks of this river is S. 43 W. of us and abt 37 miles, it is at this time toped with Snow we called this the falls mountain or Timm mountain [Mount Hood].     The face of the Countrey, on both Side of the river above and about the falls, is Steep ruged and rockey open and contain but a Small preportion of erbage, no timber a fiew bushes excepted, The nativs at the upper falls raft their timber down Towarnehooks River [Deschutes River] & those at the narrows take theirs up the river to the lower part of the narrows from this Creek, and Carry it over land 3 miles to their houses &c. at the mouth of this creek ...





Columbia PlateauReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: Columbia Gorge Discovery Center website, 2004, 2006; Columbia River Gorge History website, 2006; Early Canadiana Online website, 2006, "William Henry Gray's A history of Oregon, 1792-1849, drawn from personal observation and authentic information, published in 1870."; Elliott, T.C., 1915, The Dalles-Celilo Portage; Its History and Influence, IN: Oregon Historical Quarterly, vol.16, April 1915; End of the Oregon Trail website, 2007; "HistoryLink.org" website, 2007, "The Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History"; Horner, Professor J.B., 1919, OREGON, Her History, Her Great Men, Her Literature, Press of the Gazette-Times, Corvallis, Oregon; "historicthedalle.org" website, 2011; McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland; Mountain Men and the Furt Trade website, 2007; National Register of Historic Places website, 2011; NOAA Office of Coast Survey website, 2005; "oldstpeterslandmark.org" website, 2011; Oregon Journal, January 1, 1957, Portland, Oregon; "ourroots.ca" website, 2005, "Canada's Local Histories Online"; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2004, Portland District; U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) website, 2007; U.S. National Park Service website, 2004, John Day Fossil Beds; Washington State Historical Society website, 2004, "Lasting Legacy".

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/the_dalles.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
March 2013