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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Stanley Rock and Koberg Beach, Oregon"
Includes ... Stanley Rock ... "Stanley's rock" ... Koberg Beach State Recreation Site ... Koberg Beach State Park ...
Image, 2006, Stanley Rock, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stanley Rock, Oregon, as seen from Interstate 84, upstream. View from moving car. Image taken October 2, 2006.


Stanley Rock ...
Stanley Rock, Oregon, is located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 171, just one mile upstream of the Oregon community of Hood River and 26 miles upstream from the Bonneville Dam. Across the river is the impressive basalt anticline/syncline feature of Coyote Wall, a part of the Bingen Gap. Upstream is Eighteenmile Island and Mosier, Oregon. Stanley Rock is the remnant of a basalt flow and stands 220 feet high. A transmission tower for the Pacific Power & Light Company is located at the top.

Image, 2005, Stanley Rock, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stanley Rock, Oregon, as seen from upstream near Mosier. Interstate 84 is in the foreground, left. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Koberg Beach and Koberg Beach State Recreation Site ...
Koberg Beach State Recreation Site (often seen as "Koberg Beach State Park") is located at Stanley Rock. Today a quiet windsurfer's beach, at one time it was a bustling recreation area for the residents of Hood River, Oregon.

"... Once upon a time -- from about 1915 to about 1950 -- a giant wonderful dance hall and outdoor resort existed at Koberg Beach. When the town of Hood River wanted to cool off or go ballroom dancing to the sounds of a swing orchestra, they went to Koberg Beach. Eventually, the ballroom and the beach had to make way for the rising Columbia River when hydroelectric dams were constructed. ... Today, Koberg Beach is a wayside that serves busy westbound motorists on I-84 with a restroom and a stretch break. An enjoyable beach lies behind the great rock which screens its recreational access from the busy freeway. ..." [Oregon Parks and Recreation website, 2006]

Koberg Beach was named after John Koberg, who in 1894 purchased part of the John Stanley homestead.

"... Koberg originally farmed the area, but, when residents of Hood River came to swim in increasing numbers, he gradually added facilities. The compiler remembers visiting the place about 1930, when it included a fine stone bathhouse. ..." [McArthur and McArthur, 2003]

Most of the area which once was the Koberg property was inundated when Bonneville Dam was built. What remains is now a beach and rest area off of Interstate 84.


Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon ...

Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Painting, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Photograph, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Poster, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Early Stanley Rock ...
Stanley Rock was named for John Stanley, who operated a farm at this location and a ferry to the Washington side of the Columbia River. A reference in the June 19, 1925 The Hood River News called the rock "Stanley's rock".

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, show a John Stanley being issued a land title for 139.45 acres east of Stanley Rock on May 2, 1870, for parts of T3N R11E Section 32, under the 1862 "Homestead Entry Original". Stanley Rock is in Section 31.


Stanley Rock Basalts ...

Image, 2003, Stanley Rock, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stanley Rock, Oregon. Image taken September 29, 2003.
Image, 2003, Stanley Rock, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stanley Rock, Oregon. Image taken September 29, 2003.


Stanley Rock and Koberg in 1912 ...
LIGHT COMPANY OPPOSED
Hood River Man Denies Right of Way for Power Lines.

HOOD RIVER, Or., Aug. 8 -- (Special.) -- J.H. Koberg, of this city, against whom the Pacific Power & Light Company has filed condemnation proceedings, whereby it hopes to secure a right of way over his property along the Columbia bank east of the city, declares that he will fight the case "to the last ditch."

Mr. Koberg and several other local business men recently formed a company to raise funds for the purpose of exploiting a basalt quarry over which the proposed line of the power company will pass. "If this line is placed here," says Mr. Koberg, "it will be impossible for us to quarry the stone; for the blasting would be a serious menace to the line. The power company will be able to secure just as good approaches to the river at other points without destroying the value of property."

The Pacific Power & Light Company desires to cross the tract of land in order to reach Stanley Rock, from which point it proposes to extend a cable across the Columbia to carry high-power lines. These lines will connect the local power plant and that above Husum, Wash."


Source:    Morning Oregonian, August 9, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Koberg Beach Wayside in 1965 ...
KOBERG BEACH WAYSIDE

Koberg Beach Wayside is located on Interstate Highway 80N and includes a basaltic promontory on the south side of the Columbia River about two miles east of Hood River in Hood River County.

The wayside comprises three areas totaling 87.55 acres purchased in 1951 in connection with construction of the Columbia River Highway. One tract of 22.57 acres was obtained from the Koberg family. On it is a large rock, approximately 100 feet high, from which a great quantity of road material was taken for use in constructing the adjoining freeway. An enjoyable beach area extends from this point downstream various distances, depending on the height of the water. The other two areas are excess right of way land. One is approximately one mile east of the Koberg tract and contains 54.58 acres and the other contains 10.40 acres located at the west edge of the town of Mosier. An easement was obtained on a strip of land 30 feet wide from a point 1,122 feet south of the railroad right of way to the park on which to place a water reservoir and a pipe line to furnish water for the park.

This wayside area was acquired for three principal reasons—to develop a swimming beach on the Koberg tract, to provide a wayside rest area for the weary traveler and to preserve the land in its present state so that no objectionable use could be made of it.

Realignment of the highway between Hood River and Mosier left the old highway blocked at Mitchell Tunnel. The old right of way was abandoned to the county, and by so doing, the wayside strip along this section of the road was given to the county. Deed was written in 1953.

The recreational area was owned for many years by the Koberg family who developed the beach as a commercial playground with swimming and other sports. They constructed a large, rustic type dance hall to furnish entertainment for the people of Hood River and the surrounding country. This recreational area was known as Koberg Beach, therefore the state continued that name. The dance hall was removed in 1954.

It was not until 1962 that the entrance road, parking area and sanitary facilities were constructed and the area made ready for full use.

Attendance in 1963 totaled 65,972 day visitors."


Source:    Chester H. Armstrong (compiler), 1965, "History of the Oregon State Parks: 1917-1963, published by Oregon State Parks.



Stanley Rock Treaty Fishing Access Site, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission ...
All four Columbia River treaty tribes enjoy fishing rights along the Columbia from the Bonneville to McNary dams. This 147-mile stretch of the river is called Zone 6. The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) operates and maintains 31 fishing sites (2015, Note: the website map only shows 30 sites) in Zone 6. These sites were set aside by Congress to provide fishing locations to Indian fishers whose traditional fishing grounds were inundated behind dams.

"For fisheries management purposes, the 292-mile stretch of the Columbia River that creates the border between Washington and Oregon is divided into six zones. Zones 1-5 are between the mouth of the river and Bonneville Dam, a distance of 145 miles. Oregon and Washington manage the commercial fisheries that occur in these zones. Zone 6 is an exclusive treaty Indian commercial fishing area. This exclusion is for commercial fishing only. Non-commercial sports fishers may still fish in this stretch of the river." [Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016]

The Zone 6 sites include 19 Treaty Fishing Access sites (Bonneville, Wyeth, White Salmon, Stanley Rock, Lyle, Dallesport, Celilo, Maryhill, Rufus, Preacher's Eddy, North Shore, LePage Park, Pasture Point, Roosevelt Park, Pine Creek, Threemile Canyon, Alderdale, Crow Butte, and Faler Road), five "In-lieu" sites (Cascade Locks, Wind River, Cooks, Underwood, and Lone Pine), two "Shared-use" sites (Avery and Sundale Park, for both Tribal use and Public use), and four "Unimproved" sites with no services (Goodnoe, Rock Creek, Moonay, and Aldercreek).



From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Armstrong, C.H., (compiler), 1965, "History of the Oregon State Parks: 1917-1963, published by Oregon State Parks;    Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission website, 2016;    Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016;    McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland;    Oregon Parks and Recreation website, 2006;    "Rootsweb.com" website, 2005;    U.S. Bureau of Land Management website, 2006, General Land Office Records;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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October 2016