Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Main Menu
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Rowland Lake and Rowland Basin, Washington"
Includes ... Rowland Lake ... "DuBois Lake" ... Rowland Basin ... Rowlands Landing ... Rowland Wall ... the Labyrinth ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2012, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rowland Lake, Washington. View from Old Highway 8, looking southwest. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Rowland Lake ...
Rowland Lake is a small lake located on the north side of the Bonneville Reservior at Columbia River Mile (RM) 176, four miles east of Bingen, Washington. The lake is nestled in the sloping backside of "Coyote Wall", an anticline/syncline feature of the Bingen Gap. Rowland Lake covers nearly 85 acres and is connected to the Columbia River via a culvert. Washington Highway 14 cuts through the lake. Upstream of the lake is Catherine Creek, Major Creek, Hewett Lake, and then the Klickitat River. Rowland Lake, originally called "DuBois Lake", was originally an arm of the Columbia River.

Image, 2012, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Two halves of Rowland Lake, as seen from Old Highway 8. Washington State Highway 14 runs through the middle of Rowland Lake. View looking west. Mount Hood is in the distance. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Rowland Basin and Rowland Wall ...
Rowland Lake is nestled in the natural amphitheater of Rowland Basin, with Rowland Wall being the massive basalt cliff which rises to the east of the lake. The left (downstream) side of the basin is known as the "Labyrinth", a maze of basalt rock piles.

The Rowland Basin area has had human activity for "hundreds if not thousands of years".

"... The area between Catherine Creek and the Mosier Syncline has had human activity for hundreds if not thousands of years. Native Americans have been active here for a very long time. In the 1900s, homesteaders began busily building homes, farms, ranches and other undertakings. Roads were a big problem back then. Highway 8 wasn't built until 1910 and Highway 14 didn't come along until the mid 1930s. That meant the homesteaders had to build goat-track roads up and over the walls of Rowland Basin and Mosier Syncline to be able to drive to Bingen and beyond. ..." [Skip Tschanz, "The Dalles Chronicle", February 25, 2013, "Hiking Back in Time"]

Image, 2012, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
On Washington Highway 8 ("old Highway 8") heading into the Rowland Lake amphitheater. Rowland Basin is a natural amphitheater. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Rowland Lake Falls ...
Rowland Lake Falls is an unofficial name for a waterfall on an unnamed creek just west of Rowland Lake on the backside of Coyote Wall. During high water it is visible from Washington State Route 14.

Image, 2014, Rowland Lake Falls, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Rowland Lake Falls", an un-official name for the un-named drainage west of Rowland Lake. View from moving car heading west on Washington State Route 14. Image taken March 12, 2014.


Rowland's Landing ...
Rowland's Landing was a small landing located somewhere on the banks of the Columbia River, perhaps in today's Rowland Lake area ??? Rowland's Landing was mentioned in the April 2, 1898 "The Dalles Weekly Chronicle" (Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016):

"A large band of stock were brought up from Rowland's Landing last evening for the Columbia Packing Co."

National Register of Historic Places ...
IN 1996 the "Rowland Basin Site" (also known as 45KL327) was added to the National Register of Historic Places, with a historic function of Religion and Ceremonial Site (#96000724), with dates represented from 1900 to 500 AD.

Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife ...
"This lake is located four miles east of the town of Bingen and is split by SR-14. This lake has two fishing openers. The first is the last Saturday in April and remains open through the Sunday before Thanksgiving. The second opener is the Friday after Thanksgiving, "Black Friday opener". The lake remains open through February.

Only the north lake is stocked with trout. Thousands of catchable rainbow and hundreds of rainbow broodstock are planted in late December, early January. Broodstock can be to eleven pounds. Thousands of catchable rainbow are planted prior to the April opener, including triploids, and again in June. In November 2000 jumbo rainbow, about 1.25 lbs each are planted for the Black Friday opener.

Largemouth Bass, bluegill, and some crappie are also caught here.There is limited very rocky shore access available and a rough WDFW unimproved boat launch on the north side of the lake."

Klickitat County
Lake Acreage: 17.3
Elevation: 77 feet
Eastside Washington


Source:    Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife website, 2015.


Early Rowland Lake ...
U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest website (2006):

"... Construction of the Bonneville Dam created Rowland Lake in the 1930s. As aerial photographs from the 1930s show, Rowland Lake was formerly a marshy flat area in the bottom of a natural amphitheater (i.e. the Rowland Basin). Most of the slopes within the amphitheater are steep and covered with talus or trees, but a few flat, grassy slopes poke up through the trees like islands. ..."

Washington State Department of Ecology website (2006):

"... Orginally an arm of the Columbia River. The lake was formed by fill when the railroad was constructed here. The lake was originally called DuBois Lake and is better known by that name locally. ..."

Historical, 1874 Cadastral Survey Map, Straight Point and Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Detail, 1874 Cadastral Survey Map of T3N, R11E, showing locations of today's Straight's Point (in Section 35) and Rowland Lake (in Section 36). Original map courtesy U.S. Bureau of Land Management's Cadastral Survey database, 2016.
Historical, 1913 Klickitat County Map, Straight Point and Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Detail, 1913 Klickitat County Map showing T3N, R11E, Sections 34, 35, 36, and the Wesley Locke and R.O. Rowlan properties. Original map courtesy "HistoricMapWorks.com" website, 2016.
Historical, 1913 Klickitat County Map, Straight Point and Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Detail, 1934 Klickitat County Map showing T3N, R11E, Sections 34, 35, 36, and the Wesley Locke and Amy Locke properties, and the location of today's Rowland Lake. Highway shown is known as today's "old Highway 8". Original map courtesy "HistoricMapWorks.com" website, 2016.


Views of Rowland Lake ...

Image, 2012, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rowland Lake, Washington. Rowland Wall rises above. View from Old Highway 8, just off of Washington State Highway 14. Image taken June 15, 2012.
Image, 2012, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rowland Lake and Rowland Wall, Washington. Rowland Wall is the east side of the Rowland Basin. View from Old Highway 8. Image taken June 15, 2012.


... fall time ...

Image, 2004, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rowland Lake, Washington. Rowland Wall rises above. View from the west. Image taken November 11, 2004.
Image, 2004, Rowland Lake, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Old Highway 8, road along west side of Rowland Lake, Washington. Image taken November 11, 2004.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, April 14, 1806 ...
This morning at 7 oClock we were joined by Sgt. Pryor and they three hunters they brought with them 4 deer which drewyer had killed yesterday. we took brackfast and departed at 9 A. M. [from their camp near Dog Mountain]     the wind rose and <proceeded on> Continued to blow hard all day but not so violent as to prevent our proceeding. we kept Close allong the N. Shore all day. the river from the rapids [Cascade Rapids] to the Commencement of the narrows [The Dalles] is from to of a Mile in wedth, and possesses but little Current. the bead is rock except at the enterence of Labiech's river [Hood River] which heads in Mt. Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon] and like the quick Sand River [Sandy River] brings down from thence Vast bodies of Sand     the Mountains through which the river passes nearly to Cataract River [Klickitat River] are high broken rocky, particularly Covered with fir and white Cedar, and in maney places very romantic scences. Some handsom Cascades are Seen on either Side tumbling from the Stupendious rocks of the mountains into the river. I observe near the river the long leafed Pine which increas as we assend and Superseeds the fir altogether about the Sepulchre rock [Memaloose Island]. We find the trunks of maney large pine trees Standing erect as they grew, at present in 30 feet water [Submerged Forest]; they are much doated and none of them vegitateing. at the lowest water of the river maney of those trees are in 10 feet water. the Cause I have attempted to account for as I decended.     at 1 P M. we arrived at a large village Situated in a narrow <village> bottom on the N. Side [between the White Salmon River and Bingen, Washington] a little above the enterance of Canoe Creek [White Salmon River]. their houses are reather detached, and extend for Several Miles. they are about 20 in number. those people Call themselves Wil-la-cum. ...     We halted at this village Dined ...     after dinner we proceeded on our voyage. I walked on Shore with Shabono on the N. Side through a handsom bottom [Bingen area].     met Several parties of women and boys in Serch of herbs & roots to Subsist on maney of them had parcels of the Stems of the Sun flower. I joined Capt Lewis and the party at 6 miles, at which place the river washed the bottom of high Clifts on the N. Side [Bingen Gap]. Several Canoes over take us with families moveing up. we passed 3 encampments and came too in the mouth of a Small Creek [Major Creek] on the N. Side imediately below a village and opposit the Sepulchar rock [Memaloose Island]. this village Consists of about 100 fighting men of Several tibres from the plains to the North Collected here waiting for the Salmon. ...     made [blank] miles





Columbia River GorgeReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Tschanz, S., 2013, "The Dalles Chronicle", February 25, 2013, "Hiking Back in Time";    U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest website, 2006;    Washington State Department of Ecology website, 2006;    Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife website, 2015;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/rowland_lake.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
March 2013