Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Birds etc.
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Peter Iredale Shipwreck, Fort Stevens, Oregon"
Includes ... "Peter Iredale" ... Fort Stevens ... National Register of Historic Places ... The Golden Age of Postcards ...
Image, 2012, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Sunny, windy, late afternoon. Image taken November 26, 2012.


Wreck of the Peter Iredale ...
On October 25, 1906, during a heavy southwest wind, the four-masted British vessel, the Peter Iredale, ran aground at Clatsop Beach, off the coast of Fort Stevens.

According to the "Transcript of the Naval Court findings, Issued in London by the Board of Trade on the 24th December 1906":

"... The 'Peter Iredale' was a sailing vessel, four-masted steel barque, of 1,993 tons registered tonnage, official number 97790, and built at Maryport, England, in 1890, and belonging to the port of Liverpool, owners P. Iredale & Porter.

In appears from the evidence given before the Court that the ship sailed from Salina Cruz, Mexico, on or about the 26th of September, 1906, with 1,000 tons of ballast, and a crew of 27 hands all told, including two stowaways. No incident worthy of mention happened until the look-out sighted the light on Tillamook Rock at 3.20 a.m. on the 25th of October, 1906. The ship’s course was altered to E.N.E. until the vessel was five miles off the light. The course was then altered to sight the Columbia River lightship. This was sighted and recognized, it bearing N.E. In this position, finding the wind was veering to westward, and having lost sight of the light in a thick mist, it was decided to wear ship to avoid the influence of the current setting to the north, and the tide running into the Columbia River. The wind had now hauled to north of west in heavy squalls with rain. Just before striking, while in the act of wearing, an exceedingly heavy west north-west squall struck the vessel, throwing her head off, she taking the ground, and shortly afterwards losing her upper spars. She then drove ashore, with a high south-west sea running, and a fresh westerly gale.

We consider that everything was done by the master to get his ship out of danger, but that the set of the current and the sudden shift of wind drove him so close in that in the act of wearing around to get his ship’s head off shore, she stranded. The Court, having regard to the circumstances above stated, finds as follows:—

That the position of the ship before the shift of wind was not one of danger. She was in the usual cruising ground of the pilot schooner, but unfortunately no pilots were on the station, the pilot boat being in port under repairs.

We consider that prompt action was taken by the master immediately the wind shifted, to get his ship’s head off shore, and by all accounts he was ably seconded by his officers and men. Having carefully considered the evidence, we do find that the master, and his first and second officers, are in no wise to blame for the stranding of the said vessel, and their certificates having accordingly been returned to them.

The Court further desires to put on record their appreciation of the prompt action of the United States life-saving crew at Hammond in having the lifeboat alongside in the heavy surf, and the help given by the captain of the boat when ashore; also of the action of the commander, Col. Walker, U.S.A., and his officers and men, of Fort Stevens for their attention to the wants of the wet and hungry men when at the Fort. And lastly, the Vice-Consul desires to express his satisfaction with the quiet and orderly behaviour of the crew when in Astoria.

Given under our hands at the British Vice-Consulate at Astoria, Oregon, on the thirteenth day of November, A.D. 1906. ..."

Source:   Transcript courtesy of Historian John Porter, "www.iredale.de" website, 2006.


Penny Postcard, Peter Iredale wreck, Clatsop Spit, Oregon, 1906, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Peter Iredale wreck, Clastsop Spit, Oregon, 1906. Penny Postcard, 1906, "Peter Iredale Wreck, 1906". In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


The Peter Iredale Today ...
The skelton of the Peter Iredale is still visible today, with access to the beach from Fort Stevens.

Image, 2012, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Sunny, windy, late afternoon. Image taken November 26, 2012.
Image, 2012, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Sunny, windy, late afternoon. Image taken November 26, 2012.


... 2009 ...

Image, 2009, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Weather overcast and grey, but surprisingly no rain. Image taken August 8, 2009.
Image, 2009, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Weather overcast and grey, but surprisingly no rain. Image taken August 8, 2009.
Image, 2009, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Weather overcast and grey, but surprisingly no rain. Image taken August 8, 2009.
Image, 2009, Peter Iredale shipwreck, Fort Stevens State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Peter Iredale shipwreck, Pacific Ocean, Fort Stevens State Park, Oregon. Weather overcast and grey, but surprisingly no rain. Image taken August 8, 2009.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.

Penny Postcard, Peter Iredale wreck, Clatsop Spit, Oregon, 1906, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Peter Iredale wreck, Clastsop Spit, Oregon, 1906. Penny Postcard, 1906, "Peter Iredale Wreck, 1906". In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




Journey to the PacificReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CASCADE RANGE VOLCANOES | CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: Porter, J., "www.iredale.de" website, 2006

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/peter_iredale_shipwreck.html
© 2014, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
August 2013