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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Mount Jefferson, Oregon"
Includes ... Mount Jefferson ...
Image, 2008, Mount Jefferson from Larch Mountain, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Larch Mountain, Oregon. Image taken August 3, 2008.


Mount Jefferson ...
Mount Jefferson, at 10,495 feet, is the second tallest peak in Oregon, with Mount Hood being the tallest. Mount Jefferson is a stratovolcano which has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which ended 15,000 years ago.

"... Mt Jefferson we Can plainly See from the enterance of Multnomah from which place it bears S. E. this is a noble Mountain and I think equally as high or Something higher than Mt. St. Heleans [4] but its distance being much greater than that of the latter, So great a portion of it does not appear above the range of mountains which lie between both those Stupendious Mountains and the Mouth of Multnomah. like Mt. St. Heleans its figure is a regular Cone and is covered with eturnial Snow. ..." [Clark, April 7, 1806]

Naming Mount Jefferson ...
On March 30, 1806, Lewis and Clark gave Mount Jefferson its name.

"... we made 22 Miles only to day the wind and a Strong current being against us all day, with rain.     discovered a high mountain S E. Covered with Snow which we call Mt. Jefferson. ..." [Clark, March 30, 1806]

Image, 2004, Mount Jefferson as seen from Ryan Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from across the Columbia River, at Ryan Point. It was along this stretch of the Columbia where Lewis and Clark spotted Mount Jefferson. Image taken December 18, 2004.
"... discovered a high mountain S E. Covered with Snow which we call Mt. Jefferson. ..."
[Clark, March 30, 1806]


View of Five Volcanoes ...
From the mouth of the Willamette River, Lewis and Clark spotted five volcanoes. Mount Jefferson, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Rainier, and Mount Adams.
[More]

"... from the Columbia at the entrance of the Multnomah river Mount Jefferson bears S. E. this is a noble mountain. I think equally as high as Mount St. Helines but it's distance being much greater than that of the latter, so great a portion of it dose not appear above the range of mountains which lie betwen boath those stupendious mountains and this point of view. like mount St. Heleans it's figure is a regular cone and is covered with eternal snow. M. St. Heleans from the same point boar N [blank], Mount Hood due East, and Mount Ranier nearly North. there is also a very high humped mountain a little to the East of Mount St. Heleans which appears to lie in the same chain with those conic pointed mountains before mentioned ..." [Lewis, April 6, 1806]

Image, 2010, Mount Adams as seen from Blurock Landing, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from Blurock Landing, Washington. Blurock Landing lies across the river from the mouth of the Willamette River. Image taken March 19, 2010.


Mount Jefferson Images ...

Image, 2008, Mount Jefferson, Oregon, and the Columbia River Valley Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Larch Mountain, Oregon:
View from the top of Larch Mountain, Oregon. Larch Mountain is visible from many places along the Columbia River. Views of five Cascade Range Volcanoes can be seen from Larch Mountain.
Photo by Lyn Topinka, August 3, 2008.
RM*
Images, 2005, Mount Jefferson from Rocky Butte Mount Jefferson as seen from Rocky Butte, Oregon:
Photo by Lyn Topinka, June 15, 2005
Images, 2003, Mount Jefferson and Portland International Airport Mount Jefferson, Oregon, and Portland International Airport:
Photo by Lyn Topinka, July 4, 2003
RM*
Image, 2004, Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Ryan Point, Washington Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from Ryan Point, Washington:
Ryan Point is just upstream of Lewis and Clark's campsite of 6 days in March and April 1806.
Photo by Lyn Topinka, December 18, 2004.
RM107*
Image, 2004, Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Campsite of March 30, 1806 Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from Campsite of March 30, 1806:
Lewis and Clark spotted and named Mount Jefferson on March 30, 1806.
Photo by Lyn Topinka, March 8, 2004.
RM107*
Image, 2004, Vancouver Lake with Mount Jefferson Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Vancouver Lake, Washington:
Photo by Lyn Topinka, February 11, 2004.
Image, 2004, Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Blurock Landing, Washington Mount Jefferson, Oregon from Blurock Landing, Washington:
Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from Blurock Landing, Washington.
Photo by Lyn Topinka, February 11, 2004.
Image, 2003, Mount Jefferson from Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Mount Jefferson, Oregon, as seen from across the Shillapoo Lake Wildlife Area:
Mount Jefferson is just barely visible along the horizon.
Photo by: Lyn Topinka, July 2, 2003.
Image, 2004, Mount Jefferson from Post Office Lake, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mount Jefferson, Oregon, from Post Office Lake, Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Washington. View looking across the Shillapoo Lake Wildlife Area. Image taken, January 30, 2005.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, March 30, 1806 ...
we made 22 Miles only to day the wind and a Strong current being against us all day, with rain.     discovered a high mountain S E. Covered with Snow which we call Mt. Jefferson.





Ordway, April 1, 1806 ...
we discovred yesterday the top of a high white Mountain Some distance to the Southward our officers name it Mount Jefferson [in error, it was named on March 30, 1806]


Whitehouse, April 1, 1806 ...
we saw a high mountain laying a great distance off to the Southward of us, which appeared to be covered with snow.    Our Officers named this Mountain Jefferson Mountain. [in error, it was named on March 30, 1806]





Clark, April 2, 1806 ...
... at the distance of 13 Miles below the last village [locality of Portland International Airport] and at the place I had Supposed was the lower point of the image Canoe island [Hayden Island], I entered this river which the nativs had informed us of, Called Mult no mah River [Willamette River] so called by the nativs from a Nation who reside on Wappato Island [Sauvie Island] a little below the enterance of this river. Multnomah [Willamette River] discharges itself in the Columbia on the S. E. and may be justly Said to be the Size of that noble river. Multnomah had fallen 18 inches from it's greatest annual height. three Small Islands are situated in it's mouth which hides the river from view from the Columbia.     from the enterance of this river [Willamette River] , I can plainly See Mt. Jefferson [Mount Jefferson, Oregon] which is high and Covered with snow S. E. Mt. Hood East [Mount Hood, Oregon], Mt St. Helians [Mount St. Helens, Washington] a high humped Mountain to the East of Mt St. Helians [Mount Adams, Washington, is east of Mount St. Helens]. I also Saw the Mt. Raneer [Mount Rainier, Washington] Nearly North. ...






Clark, April 7, 1806 ...
I provaled on an old indian to mark the Multnomah R [Willamette River] down on the Sand which hid and perfectly Corisponded with the Sketch given me by sundary others, with the addition of a circular mountain which passes this river at the falls and connects with the mountains of the Seacoast. he also lais down the Clark a mos passing a high Conical Mountain near it's mouth on the lower Side and heads in Mount Jefferson [Mount Jefferson, Oregon] which he lais down by raiseing the Sand as a very high mountain and Covered with eternal Snow. the high mountain which this Indian lais down near the enterance of Clark a mos river, we have not Seen as the hills in it's direction from this vally is high and obscures the Sight of it from us. Mt Jefferson we Can plainly See from the enterance of Multnomah [Willamette River] from which place it bears S. E. this is a noble Mountain and I think equally as high or Something higher than Mt. St. Heleans [Mount St. Helens, Washington] but its distance being much greater than that of the latter, So great a portion of it does not appear above the range of mountains which lie between both those Stupendious Mountains and the Mouth of Multnomah [Willamette River]. like Mt. St. Heleans its figure is a regular Cone and is covered with eturnial Snow. that the Clarkamos nation as also those at the falls of the Multnomah [Willamette Falls, at Oregon City, Oregon] live principally on fish of which those Streams abound and also on roots which they precure on it's borders, they also Sometimes Come down to the Columbia in Serch of Wappato. they build their houses in the Same form with those of the Columbian Vally of wide Split boads and Covered with bark of the White Cedar which is the entire length of the one Side of the roof and jut over at the eve about 18 inches. at the distance of about 18 inches transvers Spinters of dried pine is inserted through the Ceder bark inorder to keep it Smooth and prevent it's edge from Colapsing by the heat of the Sun; in this manner the nativs make a very Secure light and lasting roof of this bark. which we have observed in every Vilege in this Vally as well as those above. this Indian also informed me the multnomah above the falls was Crouded with rapids and thickly inhabited by indians of the Cal-lah-po--wah Nation. he informed he had himself been a long way up that river &c.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Walder, J.S., et.al., 1999, Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 99-24.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
December 2008