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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Mosier and Mosier Creek, Oregon"
Includes ... Mosier ... Mosier Syncline ... Mosier Totem ... Mosier Twin Tunnels ... Marsh Cutoff Road ... Mayerdale Place ... "Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail" ...
Image, 2010, Sign, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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"Welcome to Mosier", Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2010.


Mosier ...
The small community of Mosier is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 175. Five miles downstream is Hood River and 15 miles upstream is The Dalles. Today Mosier is well known for being the eastern end of the Twin Tunnels of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Across the Columbia from Mosier is the basalts of the Bingen Gap. Upstream on the Oregon side are the basalts of Rowena Gap and the beautiful area of the Tom McCall Nature Preserve.

Image, 2005, Mosier, Oregon, as seen from downstream, click to enlarge
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Mosier, Oregon, as seen from downstream. View from the Mark O. Hatfield State Trail. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2004, Columbia River from upstream Mosier, click to enlarge
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Columbia River looking downstream towards Mosier, Oregon. View from along the Historic Columbia River Highway upstream of Mosier, Oregon. Eighteenmile Island can be seen on the left just off the Oregon shore. The location of Mosier, Oregon, is located on the left. The basalts of the Bingen Gap are visible on the right. Image taken March 20, 2004.


Rock Creek and Mosier Creek ...
Rock Creek is an intermittent stream which begins in Hood River County and merges with the Columbia River in Wasco County at approximately Columbia River Mile (RM) 175, just west of the community of Mosier.

Mosier Creek begins approximately 15 miles northeast of Mount Hood and lies within Wasco County. It merges with the Columbia River at RM 175, east of the community of Mosier. Mosier Creek was at one time known as "East Fork Mosier Creek". The Board of Geographic Names made "Mosier Creek" official in 1976.


Image, 2016, Mosier Creek, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier and Mosier Creek Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.
Image, 2016, Mosier Creek, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier Creek, Mosier, Oregon. View upstream from right bank. Image taken March 30, 2016.


Early Mosier ...
Mosier began in 1853 or 1854 when Jonah H. Mosier settled on a claim near the mouth of Mosier Creek. Mosier ran a "rest area" stage station for weary travelers. The Mosier Post Office was established in 1884 and the town was incorporated in 1914.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records, show a Jane and Heirs of Jonah H. Mosier being issued a land title on October 15, 1873, for 258.9 acres of parts of T2N R11E Sections 1 and 2 (1850 "Oregon-Donation Act") and Jonah H. Mosier was issued a land title on July 25, 1892, for 93.53 acres of parts of T2N R11E Section 1 (1820 "Sale-Cash Entry") and on August 14, 1893, for 31.2 acres of parts of T2N R11E (1820 "Sale-Cash Entry").

Death of Hon. J.H. Mosier.

"At Mosier, Friday afternoon Oct. 5th, 1894, at 1:15 Jonah Harrison Mosier, aged 73 years 6 months and 25 days. Funeral in Mosier cemetery Monday morning at 10 o'clock under the direction of the Masonic Fraternity.

Jonah Harrison Mosier was born in Maryland March 10th, 1821, and was therefore 73 years old. While yet an infant his family emigrated to Pennsylvania and successively afterward to Iowa and Wisconsin. In the latter named state, at Smithsville, he was married in 1846 to Jane Rollins. In 1849 he moved to California, and being a carpenter by trade built several houses both in San Francisco and the state capital. ...

Later he left California for his former home in Missouri, but like all others who have had a taste of western life, he soon tired of his old surroundings, and in 1853 bade farewell forever to Missouri, removing directly to The Dalles, Oregon. He, with Col. Gates and Judge Laughlin (father of Frank J. Laughlin) first platted the city of The Dalles. Soon thereafter Mr. Mosier was again busy with his hammer and saw and built the first business houses of the city. In the spring of 1855 he settled at Moser, where he has resided ever since. His pursuits since then were varied. In 1855 he erected a sawmill, which is believed to have been the first operated in Wasco county. He also drove cattle to the mines, and himself owned large bands. He had an occasional brush with Indians, and on one occasion nearly met his death while rowing a large sail boat up the river during a comparative calm. ... More than once Mr. Mosier, with his family, has been compelled to temporarily abandon his place in the night, being threatened by predatory Indians. But though courageous and resolute, he never retaliated in kind, depending more upon kindheartedness and inoffensive conduct toward his copper-hued bretheren than the modern weapons of offense and defense. In 1876 Mr. Mosier served the state with dignity and honor in the legislature.

His wife died in 1865, after bearing seven children ... In 1866 he married Mrs. Martha J. Lewis. Two children were the fruits of the latter marriage ...

Mr. Moser has been quite ill since the latter part of June ... The creek he settled and the town he located justly bear the name of its locally illustrious founder, all now given to history and memory in minds of men. He professed religion a short time before his death, and sustained by its consolations and an indomitable will, he bore his sufferings uncomplainingly to the end."




Source:    "The Dalles Daily Chronicle, October 6, 1894, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University or Oregon Libraries, 2016.

Real Estate Transactions.

The following deeds have been filed for the record: ...

12th -- Jonah H Mosier and wife to Jefferson Mosier, Lydia S Mosier, Sarah A Faucette and Mary S Adams, the west half of the donation land claim of Jonah Mosier and Jane Mosier, deceased; $1 and love and affection.

Jonah H Mosier and wife to Sarah A Faucette, n1/2, se1/4, sec 6, tp 2 n of r 12 e; $1 and love and affection.

Jonah H Mosier and wife to Jefferson N Mosier, 170.38 acres.

Jonah H Mosier and wife to Lydia S Mosier, n1/2 of sw1/4, sec 6, tp 2 n of r12 e; $1 and love and affection.


Source:    "The Dalles Daily Chronicle", October 16, 1894, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University or Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Real Estate Transactions.

Deeds were filed yesterday and today as follows: ...

Jonah H. Mosier and Martha Mosier to Effie J. PHillips, 80 acres off Marshall donation claim; $1 and love and affection.

Jonah H. Mosier and Martha Mosier to Dolly C. Mosier, 80 acres off Marshall donation land claim; $1 and love and affection.

Jonah H. Mosier to Martha Mosier, east half of donation land claim of Jonah Mosier and Jane Mosier, deceased; $1 and love and affection.


Source:    "The Dalles Daily Chronicle", November 9, 1894, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University or Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Image, 2011, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier Valley Post Office, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2011.


Information Sign ...
MOSIER
a fruitful BOUNTY

"Residents of Mosier have always welcomed travelers -- even as far back as 1854, when Jonah H. Mosier settled here on a donation land claim. Mosier, a cabinetmaker by trade, had made the rugged trip west twice -- to California in 1849, and again to Oregon in 1853. Mosier and his wife operated an impromptu stage station, catering to the hundreds of Oregon Trail emigrants who streamed down the Gorge on their way to the Willamette Valley.

The railroad arrived in 1882 and sparked a real estate boom as settlers, drawn by the case of transportation and by reports of idea apple-growing conditions, queued up to purchase land. As it turned out, cherries were far more suitable for the area's soil -- but it would take many years for growers to realize this -- and even more years for them to switch crops.

Mosier got another infusion of industry with the arrival of the Columbia River Highway in 1921. Roadhouses, restaurants, and service stations lined the scenic road where it passed through town, and the hills echoed with the sputter and cough of touring cars on their way to or from The Dalles."


Source:    Mosier information sign, Mosier, Oregon, visited June 2009.


Image, 2009, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Information sign, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Mosier in 1940 ...
From the Oregon State Archives "A 1940 Journey Across Oregon":

"MOSIER, 118.1 m. (95 alt., 192 pop.), at the confluence of Mosier Creek and the Columbia River, is in a small fruit growing section well known for its apple cider. The MOSIER TUNNELS, 119.5 m., one 261 feet and the other 60 feet long, often referred to as the Twin Tunnels, penetrate a promontory more than 250 feet above the river. West of this point the contrast between the barren, semi desert contours of eastern Oregon and the lushness of the Pacific Slope becomes apparent. "


Views ...

Image, 2007, Mosier Cafe, click to enlarge
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Mosier Market. Image taken May 13, 2007.
Image, 2009, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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First Christian Church, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Mosier's First Christian Church was dedicated October 31, 1909.
Image, 2009, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier "Route 30" Cafe, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.
Image, 2007, Mosier Cafe, click to enlarge
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Mosier "Route 30" Cafe, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.


Mosier, etc.

  • Historic Columbia River Highway ...
  • HCRH - Mosier Bridges ...
  • Marsh Cutoff Road ...
  • Mayerdale Place ...
  • Mosier Fruit Growers Association ...
  • Mosier Plateau Trail ...
  • Mosier Syncline ...
  • Mosier Totem ...
  • Mosier Trading Company ...
  • Mosier Twin Tunnels ...
  • "Octagonal House" ...
  • Orchards ...
  • Pioneer Cemetery ...
  • Union Pacific ...


Historic Columbia River Highway ...
[More Historic Columbia River Highway]
[More HCRH Route]


HCRH - Mosier Bridges ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway's Rock Creek Bridge was built in 1918 and renovated in 1996.

"This reinforced concrete slab span bridge is 45 feet in length, with two 22-foot spans." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

"This 44-foot reinforced-concrete structure consists of two 22-foot slab spans. Railings were similar to those on the Tanner Creek Bridge. Decades ago, they were removed and replaced with wooden rails. In 1996, ODOT reconstructed the original concrete railings." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

The Mosier Creek Bridge was built in 1920.

"This reinforced concrete deck arch structure is 182 feet long, consisting of a 110-foot rib arch and concrete slab approaches." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

"This 182-foot reinforced-concrete structure includes a 110-foot open-spandrel ribbed deck arch, and is the first of a group of bridges that McCullough (C.B. McCullough, Oregon State Highway Department) created for the highway. Here, he incorporated many classical design elements in railing panels, spandrel columns, and brackets that became part of his signature style." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2016, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier Creek Bridge, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.
Image, 2016, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier Creek Bridge, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.


Marsh Cutoff Road ...
Marsh Cutoff Road is approximately four miles east of Mosier and is reached from the Historic Columbia River Highway. The road is lined with fields, marshes, and oak groves and is a wonderful place to look for Lewis's Woodpeckers, Western Bluebirds, and Western Meadowlarks.

Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Scenic, Marsh Cuttoff Road, near Historic Columbia River Highway Milepost Marker 77, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.
Image, 2010, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Lewis's Woodpecker, Marsh Cutoff Road, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken April 25, 2010.


Mayerdale Place ...
The Mayerdale Place, finished in 1913, is located on the north side of the Historic Columbia River Highway between Mosier and Rowena Crest. According to the "a2zgorge.info" website (2010):

"... In 1910 Mark Mayer established a home and a 230 acre apple orchard in Mosier. His home was a stately masion known as Mayerdale Place. In addition he also donated to Wasco county that the land that is now known as Mayer State Park, near Rowena, on the Columbia River. ..."

[More]

Image, 2010, Mayerdale Place, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mayerdale Place, view from the east, Mosier, Oregon. Note apple orchard in the background. Image taken March 6, 2010.
Image, 2010, Mayerdale Place, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mayerdale Place, view from the southwest, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2010.


Mosier Fruit Growers Associaton ...
(to come)

Image, 1919, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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HISTORICAL Newspaper image, Mosier Fruit Growers Association Building, Mosier, Oregon. Image from Sunday Oregonian, December 21, 1919, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.
Image, 2011, Mosier Fruit Growers building, click to enlarge
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Mosier Fruit Growers building, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 4, 2011.


Mosier Plateau Trail ...
Mosier Plateau Trail
Turn north off HWY 30 east of the totem pole at the CITY PARKING sign.
Park between HWY 30 and the rail road.
Walk 1/4 mile east on HWY 30 to cross to the trail head on the south side of the road.
DO NOT PARK ON HWY 30

Trail Length: 3.5 miles out and back, including the HWY 30 walk.
Difficulty: Moderate (includes stair sections)


The Mosier Plateau Trail was developed by the Frineds of the Columbia Gorge in collaboration with the City of Mosier.

This trail is the first of the Gorge Towns To Trails, a comprehensive trail system that wraps around the Columbia Gorge, linking communities with recreation and enhancing community downtown vitality.

CITY OF MOSIER
small enough to make a difference


Source:    Information Sign, Mosier, Oregon, visited March 2016.


Image, 2016, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, Mosier Plateau Trail, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.
Image, 2016, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign detail, Mosier Plateau Trail, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.


Mosier Syncline ...
The Mosier Syncline is the lowpoint between the Bingen Anticline to the west, and the Ortley Anticline to the east.
[More]

Mosier Totem ...
The Mosier Totem was carved by Jeff Stewart of Dufur, Oregon.
[More]

Image, 2007, Mosier Totem, click to enlarge
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Mosier Totem, carved by Jeff Stewart. Image taken May 13, 2007.
Image, 2005, Mosier Totem, click to enlarge
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Mosier Totem, carved by Jeff Stewart. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2005, Mosier Totem, click to enlarge
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Eagle, Mosier Totem. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Mosier Trading Company ...
The building of the Mosier Trading Company was one of the first buildings in downtown Mosier.

Image, 1905, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
HISTORICAL Newspaper image, Mosier Trading Company, Mosier, Oregon. Image from Hood River Glacier, September 7, 1905, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.
Image, 2009, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mosier Trading Company building, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.
Image, 2009, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mosier Trading Company building, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Mosier Twin Tunnels ...
The "Twin Tunnels" of Mosier were once part of the Historic Columbia River Highway and are now part of Oregon's Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.
[More]

Image, 2005, East Portal, Mosier Tunnels, click to enlarge
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East Portal, Mosier Tunnels. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2005, East Portal, Mosier Tunnels, click to enlarge
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East Portal, Mosier Twin Tunnels. Image taken September 18, 2005.


"Octagonal House" ...

Image, 2009, Octagonal House, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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"Octagonal House", Mosier, Oregon. Historic Columbia River Highway, Mosier to Rowena. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Orchards ...
"Regular rows of fruit trees extend on either side of the highway [Historic Columbia River Highway], giving the subsection a rural, agricultural look. This subsection is climaxed by a glimpse of the large Mayerdale house, the site of one of the dedication ceremonies for the HCRH. A new deer fence detracts from the view of the orchards."


Source:    HCRH Master Plan, 2005.

Image, 2016, Orchards near Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Orchards near Mosier, Historica Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.
Image, 2005, Orchards, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Orchards along the Historic Columbia River Highway, east of Mosier, Oregon. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Pioneer Cemetery ...
"The Mosier Pioneer Cemetery Is historically significant on a local level for its association with the founders of Mosier, the Jane and Jonah Mosier family. Many of the family members and close friends are interred in the Mosier Pioneer Cemetery, and represent some of the earliest Euro-American burials in the Mosier area. The first known burial (1865) was that of Jane Mosier, the wife of Jonah Mosier who established the original donation land claim in the area. The historic period of significance is from 1865 to 1901. The beginning date signifies the first known burial and the end date corresponds to the last recorded historic burial."


Source:    "CityOfMosier.com" website, 2016.

Image, 2016, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mosier Pioneer Cemetery bench, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2016.


Union Pacific ...
[More]

Image, 2007, Union Pacific, click to enlarge
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Union Pacific 3143, Mosier, Oregon. Union Pacific train passing Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.
Image, 2007, Amtrak Yard Switcher 530, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Amtrak Yard Switcher 530, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.

"MP15 #530-539 were built in 1970 for the P&LE as #1585, 1586, 1589 to 1895, 1897. Acquired by Amtrak June 1993 from P&LE. Overhauled by Amtrak at Wilmintong DE in 2004/05." ["hebners.net" website, 2016, "Amtrak Photo Archives"]
Image, 2007, Great Northern, click to enlarge
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Ex-Great Northern wood chip hopper now owned by Greenbrier Companies, GBRX 34648. Big Sky Blue paint. Union Pacific train passing Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.

"Greenbrier Companies, headquartered in Lake Oswego, Oregon, is a leading international supplier of equipment and services to the freight rail transportation markets." ["gbrx.com" website, 2016]
Image, 2007, Great Northern, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Ex-Great Northern wood chip hopper now owned by Greenbrier Companies, GBRX 34650. Big Sky Blue paint. Union Pacific train passing Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.

Between 1967 and 1970 Great Northern freight cars were painted "Big Sky Blue". ["gnrhs.org" website, 2016, "Paint Schemes"]
Image, 2007, Great Northern, click to enlarge
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Ex-Great Northern wood chip hopper now owned by Greenbrier Companies, GBRX 34650. Big Sky Blue paint. Union Pacific train passing Mosier, Oregon. Image taken May 13, 2007.
Image, 2007, Northern Pacific, click to enlarge
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Northern Pacific wood chips car. Union Pacific train passing Mosier, Oregon. Blue boxcar behind is a Great Northern boxcar (see above). Image taken May 13, 2007.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 29, 1805 ...
A cloudy morning wind from the West but not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point], and proceeded on about five miles Came too on the Stard. Side at a village of 7 houses built in the Same form and materials of those above, here we found the Chief we had Seen at the long narrows [The Dalles] ...     they are hospitable and good humered Speak the Same language of the inhabitants of the last village, we call this the friendly village [vicinity of Dougs Beach]. ...     after brackfast we proceeded on, the mountains are high on each Side [high basalt cliffs of the Rowena Gap, with Rowena Crest on the south and the Chamberlain Lake area on the north], containing Scattering pine white oake & under groth, hill Sides Steep and rockey; at 4 miles lower we observed a Small river falling in with great rapidity on the Stard. Side [Klickitat River] below which is a village of 11 houses [today the town of Lyle is on the upstream side of the Klickitat], here we landed to Smoke a pipe with the nativs and examine the mouth of the river, which I found to be 60 yards wide rapid and deep, The inhabitants of the village are friendly and Chearfull; those people inform us also those at the last village that this little river is long and full of falls, no Salmon pass up it, it runs from N. N. E. that ten nations live on this river and its waters, on buries, and what game that Can kill with their Bow & arrows

we purchased 4 dogs and Set out- (this village is the of the Same nation of the one we last passed) and proceeded on The Countrey on each side begin to be thicker timbered with Pine and low white Oake; verry rockey and broken [passing Mayer State Park on the Oregon side]. passed three large rocks in The river the middle rock is large long and has Several Squar vaults on it. we call this rockey Island the Sepulchar [Memaloose Island] - The last river we passed we Shall Call the Cataract River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians say is on it- passed 2 Lodges of Indians a Short distance below the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island] on the Stard. Side river wide, at 4 mile passed 2 houses on the Stard. Side, Six miles lower passed 4 houses above the mouth of a Small river 40 yards wide on the Lard. Side [Hood River]    a thick timbered bottom above & back of those houses; those are the first houses which we have Seen on the South Side of the Columbia River, (and the axess to those dificuelt) for fear of the approach of their common enemies the Snake Indians, passed 14 houses on the Std. Side Scattered on the bank- from the mouth of this little river which we shall Call Labeasche River [Hood River], the falls mountain [Mount Hood] is South and the top is covered with Snow.    one mile below pass the mouth of a large rapid Stream on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River], opposit to a large Sand bar [from Hood River], in this creek the Indians above take their fish, here we Saw Several canoes, which induced us to call this Canoe Creek [White Salmon River] it is 28 yards wide, about 4 miles lower and below the Sand bar [Hood River sandbar] is a butifull cascade falling over a rock of about 100 feet [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, location of the Columbia Gorge Hotel],

[On the route map (Moulton, vol.1, map#78) a "C___ Spring" is shown on the north side of the river, today the location of Spring Creek and Spring Creek Fish Hatchery, with no mention of it in any text. On the south side, at the location of Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, only "Cascade" is labeled and "4 Houses of Indians".]

a Short distance lower passed 4 Indian houses on the Lard. Side in a timbered bottom, a fiew miles further we came too at 3 houses on Stard. Side, back of which is a pond [today the location of Drano Lake. The Little White Salmon River empties into Drano Lake.] in which I Saw Great numbers of Small Swan, Capt. Lewis and went into the houses of those people ...     Here the mountains are high on each Side, those to the Lard. Side has Some Snow on them at this time, more timber than above and of greater variety.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    "a2zgorge.info" website, 2005, 2010;    Dohnal, 2003, The Making of America Series: Columbia River Gorge, Natural Treasure on the Old Oregon Trail, Arcadia Press;    Great Northern Railway Historical Society website, 2016;    "Hebners.net" website, 2016, "Amtrak Photo Archives";    Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016;    Leininger, J., "A History of Mosier & Its Valley", A History of Wasco County website, 2009;    McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2004, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland;    "meyerdale.com" website, 2015;    State of Oregon Archivist website, 2005, "A 1940 Journey Across Oregon";   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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November 2016