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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"USS LCI-L-713 and Sakarissa YTM-269 ... Portland, Oregon"
Includes ... USS LCI-L-713 and Sakarissa YTM-269 ...
Image, 2011, USS_LCI-L-713_and_Sakarissa_YTM-269, Portland, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
USS LCI-L-713 and Sakarissa YTM-269, Portland, Oregon. The Thunderbird Hotel in the background. View from Vancouver Landing, Washington. Image taken July 2, 2011.


USS LCI-L-713, Portland, Oregon ...
Currently being restored and housed at Swan Island, Portland, Oregon, next to the PT-658.

LCI 713

"The LCI (L) 713 was originally built at the Lawley Shipyards in Neponset, Massachusetts and was commissioned on September 18th, in 1944. After shakedown and training cruises at Solomons, Maryland, she sailed through the Panama Canal to the Pacific Theater of Operations where she earned a battle star while assigned to Flotilla 24. She participated on two combat landings in Mindanao and Borneo before the end of World War II. From then on until December 1945 she transported troops around the Philippines. She arrived back in the United States in January 1946. She was decommissioned on October 6th, 1946 and released to the Maritime Commission for sale.

On February 10th, 1948, the ship was purchased at government auction by C. T. Smith & Son and picked up from the Navy in Seattle. After a two day trip to Portland, Oregon, it was found that she would not be practical for towing logs so she was docked and for several years used for stowing gear and fuel for the log-towing company. In the late 1950's the 713 started taking on water and sunk in the Columbia River near the town of Stevenson, Washington.At this point Arthur A. Raz became intrigued with the sunken 713. Finally in February 1976, he raised the ship and towed it to Portland, Oregon. He had originally planned for the ship to be converted into a commercial tug boat but found that the design of the ship was impractical for such purposes. He had discussed the possibility of restoring it. However, due to his untimely death, he was never able see it through. The ship was sold for scrap value in 1998 to a group of individuals who recognized it for its historical value. In order to ensure that the 713 would be protected and preserved for future generations, the AFMM was formed as a non-profit and in 2006 the AFMM purchased the LCI-713. Our dedicated team of volunteers that include electricians, welders, college students, businessmen along with several LCI veterans who share a common interest are bringing the ship back to her original war time condition. They are proud to be involved in the restoration of this ship, making her the last remaining LCI in the original war time configuration."


Source:    Amphibious Forces Memorial Museum ("amphibiousforces.org") website, 2015.



Sakarissa YTM-269, Portland, Oregon ...
Currently being restored and housed on the Columbia River, Portland, Oregon.

"Sakarissa YTB-269"

(YT-269: dp. 345- (f.) ; l. 100'; b. 26'; dr. 9'7"; s. 16 k.; cpl. 14; cl. Hiawatha; T. V2-ME-A1)

A chief of the Tuscarora tribe during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Sakarissa (YT-269) was laid down as Port Madison under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 436) on 13 April 1942 by Birchfield Boiler, Inc., Tacoma, Wash.; launched on 14 July 1942; sponsored by Mrs. William Walker; acquired by the Navy on 12 April 1943 and renamed Sakarissa (YT-269); and placed in service on 26 April 1943.

Following her initial training, Sakarissa was assigned to ABSD-1 and began work to prepare that sectional dock for transit from the west coast to the New Hebrides. At the end of August, the sectional dock was ready and Sakarissa departed San Francisco in the force which towed ABSD-1 west. Thirty-four days later, on 2 October, she reached Espiritu Santo and began work to reassemble the ABSD at Pallikulo Bay, between Aessi Island and Espiritu Santo. The job, delayed by accidents, stretched through November. Early in December, the ABSD began docking and repair work. Sakarissa remained assigned to the sectional dock to assist in docking and undocking warships and merchant ships that required her services.

In the spring of 1945, the ABSD was ordered further west; and, after being dismantled, departed the New Hebrides in July, accompanied by Sakarissa, now designated YTB-269, and other ships assigned to her. By the end of World War II, services had been resumed at Samar, Philippines. The large number of ships involved in post-war activities and the limited facilities available, kept the force occupied into the spring of 1946 when the number of ships had dwindled and permanent docking facilities had been established. ABSD-1 was ordered decommissioned and inactivated. Sakarissa, with other tugs, was ordered back to the United States. In mid-April, the YTB departed the Philippines. By mid-May, she was in the Marshalls; and, in mid-June, she arrived in Pearl Harbor. Two months later, she resumed her voyage eastward and reached San Francisco on 22 August. Sakarissa, redesignated YTM in 1962, provided harbor tug services to the 12th Naval District until 15 January 1974. At that time, her name was struck from the Navy list, and she was transferred to the Maritime Administration for further service with the Reserve Fleet at Suisun Bay, California."


Source:    "history.navy.mil" website, 2015.


Image, 2014, Sakarissa_YTM-269, Portland, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sakarissa YTM-269, Portland, Oregon. NOTE: the Thunderbird Hotel is missing the background as it burned to the ground in 2014. The "USS LCI-L-713" is now being moored at Swan Island. View from Vancouver Landing, Washington. Image taken April 30, 2014.
Image, 2013, Sakarissa_YTM-269, Portland, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sakarissa YTM-269, Portland, Oregon. Image taken November 8, 2013.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:  

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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June 2015