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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Lewis River Floodplain, Washington"
Includes ... Lewis River ... Lewis River Floodplain ... "Woodland Bottoms" ...
Image, 2012, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Ring-necked Pheasant, Woodland Bottoms, Woodland, Washington. Image taken December 5, 2012.


Lewis River Floodplain ...
The Lewis River Floodplain extends five miles along the Washington shore, from the mouth of the Lewis River at Columbia River Mile (RM) 87.5, to downstream Burke and Martin Islands, at RM 82.5. The community of Woodland lies along the right bank of the Lewis River where the Lewis leaves the Cascade foothills and the floodplain begins.

"Woodland Bottoms" ...
A local name for the Lewis River Floodplain (especially among birders) is "Woodland Bottoms".

Views ...

Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken March 4, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Field, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Daffodils, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken March 29, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Tulips, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken April 22, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Tulip field, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken April 22, 2007.
Image, 2013, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Tulip field, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken April 13, 2013.
Image, 2013, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tulip show field, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken April 13, 2013.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Pumpkin field, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Lewis River railroad bridge, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2015, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood with barn, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken January 29, 2015.
Image, 2017, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Mount Adams as seen from the Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken January 6, 2017.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Farm, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2017, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Scenic, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken January 6, 2017.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Two barns, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken March 29, 2007.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
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Farmyard, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken March 29, 2007.
Image, 2017, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sheep, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken January 6, 2017.
Image, 2007, Lewis River Floodplain, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Ring-necked Pheasant, Lewis River Floodplain. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2012, Woodland Bottoms, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
White-crowned Sparrow, Woodland Bottoms, Woodland, Washington. Image taken December 5, 2012.
Image, 2016, Lewis River at Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
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Bald Eagles, Lewis River at Woodland, Washington. Image taken May 16, 2016.


Tulips ...

Image, 2007, Tulips, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tulip field, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken April 22, 2007.
Image, 2007, Tulips, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tulips, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken April 22, 2007.
Image, 2007, Tulips, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tulip field, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken April 22, 2007.


Pumpkins ...

Image, 2007, Pumpkin Patch, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Pumpkin Patch, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Pumpkin Patch, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Pumpkin Patch, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Pumpkin Patch, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Pumpkin Patch, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Pumpkin Patch, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Pumpkin Patch, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken October 14, 2007.
Image, 2007, Pumpkin Patch, Woodland, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Pumpkin Patch, Lewis River floodplain, Woodland, Washington. Image taken October 14, 2007.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, March 28, 1806 ...
This morning we Set out verry early [from their campsite near Goble, Oregon] and at 9 A. M. arived at an old Indian Village on the N E side of Deer island [Deer Island] where we found our hunters had halted and left one man with the Canoes at their Camp, they arrived last evening at this place, and Six of them turned out very early to hunt, at 10 A. M. they all returned to camp haveing killed Seven Deer, those were all of the Common fallow Deer with a long tail [Columbian White-tailed Deer, currently being protected in the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge]. I measured the tail of one of these bucks which was upwards of 17 inches long; they are very poor, tho' they are better than the black tail Species of the Sea coast.     those are two very distinct Species of Deer.     the Indians call this large Island E-lal-lar, or Deer Island [Deer Island] which is a very appropriate name.     the hunters informed us that they had Seen upwards of a hundred Deer this morning on this island.     the interior of this Island is a prarie & ponds, with a heavy growth of Cotton wood, ash & willow near the river.     we have Seen more water fowl on this island than we have previously Seen Since we left Fort Clatsop [Fort Clatsop, where the men wintered over], ...     at after 10 A. M. it became fair and we had the Canoes which wanted repareing hauled out and with the assistance of fires which we had kindled for the purpose dryed them Sufficiently to receve the pitch which was imedeately put on them; at 3 in the evening we had them Compleated and lanced and reloaded.     we should have Set out but some of the party whome we had permitid to hunt Since we arrived heve not yet returned.     we determined to remain here this evening [near the northern end of Deer Island] and dry our bedding &c. the weather being fair. Since we landed here we were visited by a large Canoe with ten nativs of the Quathlahpohtle nation who are numerous and reside about fourteen Miles above us on the N E. Side of the Columbia [today within the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge] above the Enterance of a Small river which the Indians call Chh-wh-na-hi-ooks [Lewis River].     we saw a great number of Snakes on this island; ...     The men who had been Sent after the deer returned with four only, the other 4 haveing been eaten entirely by the Voulturs except the Skin. The men we had been permitted to hunt this evening killed 3 deer 4 Eagles & a Duck.     the deer are remarkably pore. Some rain in the after part of the day. we only made 5 miles to day.






Clark, March 29, 1806 ...
we Set out very early this morning [from their camp on Deer Island] and proceeded to the head of deer island [Deer Island, Oregon] and took brackfast. the morning was very cold wind Sharp and keen off the rainge of Mountains to the East Covered with snow [Cascade Mountain Range]. the river is now riseing very fast and retards our progress very much as we are compelled to keep out at Some distance in the Curent to clear the bushes, and fallin trees and drift logs makeing out from the Shore. dureing the time we were at Brackfast a Canoe with three Indians of the Clan-nar-min-na-mon Nation came down, ...     they reside on Wappato Inlet [Multnomah Channel] which is on the S W. side about 12 miles above our encampment of the last night [Deer Island] and is about 2 miles from the lower point, four other Tribes also reside on the inlet and Sluce which passes on the South W. Side of the Island [Sauvie Island], ...    we proceeded on to the lower point of the Said island [Sauvie Island] accompanied by the 3 Indians, & were met by 2 canoes of nativs of the quath-lah-pah-tal who informed us that the chanel to the N E of the Island [Sauvie Island, the other channel being today's Multnomah Channel] was the proper one. we prosued their advice and Crossed into the mouth of the Chah-wah-na-hi-ooks River [Lewis River] which is about 200 yards wide and a great portion of water into the columbia at this time it being high. The indians inform us that this river is crouded with rapids after Some distance up it. Several tribes of the Hul-lu-et-tell Nation reside on this river. at 3 oClock P. M. we arived at the Quath lah pah tle Village [Cathlapotle Village, today within the Ridgefield NWR, Carty Unit] of 14 Houses on main Shore to the N E. Side of a large island [Bachelor Island]. ...     we purchased wappatoe and Some pashaquar roots.     gave a Medal of the Small Size [Jefferson Peace Medal] to the principal Chief, and at 5 oClock reembarked and proceeded up [on Lake River] on the N E. of an Island [Bachelor Island] to an inlet [??? perhaps drainage from Carty Lake] about 1 mile [Lewis says 2 miles] above the village and encamped on a butifull grassy plac [Wapato Portage], where the nativs make a portage of their Canoes and Wappato roots to and from a large pond at a Short distance [Carty Lake]. in this pond [Carty Lake] the nativs inform us they Collect great quantities of pappato, which the womin collect by getting into the water, Sometimes to their necks holding by a Small canoe and with their feet loosen the wappato or bulb of the root from the bottom from the Fibers, and it imedeately rises to the top of the water, they Collect & throw them into the Canoe, those deep roots are the largest and best roots. Great numbers of the whistling Swan, Gees and Ducks in the Ponds. ...     we made 15 miles to day only.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:   See Lewis River page for information and sources.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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April 2011