Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Knappa and Knappa Slough, Warren's Landing and Warren Slough, Oregon"
Includes ... Knappa ... Knappa Landing ... Knappa Slough ... Warren Slough ... Warren's Landing ... Karlson Island ... National Register of Historic Places Site ... Birds on Knappa Slough ...
Image, 2004, Dock on Knappa Slough, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Knappa Slough, at Knappa, Oregon. View is looking straight up Knappa Slough with Karlson Island on the left. Warren Slough is just beginning to branch on the right. Private dock is in the foreground. Image taken June 16, 2004.


Knappa ...
Knappa, Oregon, is located on the south side of the Columbia River, approximately 12 miles east of Astoria. Bordering Knappa are the islands of Cathlamet Bay and the Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge. Upstream is Blind Slough, Brownsmead, and Aldrich Point. Downstream is the small community of Svensen and further downstream is Settler Point and the Twilight Eagle Sanctuary.

Knappa Slough ...
The head of Knappa Slough begins where Blind Slough and Prairie Channel meet, at the southern end of Marsh Island and the eastern end of Karlson Island, two of the islands in the Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge. The mouth of Knappa Slough is across from Minaker Island and splits into Big Creek Slough and Calendar Slough before merging into Prairie Channel at the southeastern end of Russian Island, at the eastern end of Cathlamet Bay. Downstream of Knappa Slough is Svensen Island, Settler Point, and the location of today's Twilight Eagle Sanctuary, the location of Lewis and Clark's campsite of November 26, 1805.

Warren Slough ...
Warren Slough borders the north side of the Knappa area and enters Knappa Slough just upstream of the dock at Knappa Landing. At one time this area was known as "Warren's Landing". Most of Warren Slough lies within T8N R7W Section 8. According to "rootsweb.com" website (2010, Clatsop County), in 1885 John F. Warren took out a homestead claim in T8 R7.

Lewis and Clark and the Knappa area ...
Lewis and Clark passed the Knappa area on November 26, 1805. Today's community is near the location of the "Cathlahmah" village which they visited. That village is assumed to have moved then across the river to the Washington side, becoming the town of Cathlamet.

Lewis and Clark spent the night of November 26, 1805, approximately 10 miles south of Knappa, on Cathlamet Bay near the Twilight Eagle Sanctuary.


Early Knappa and Knappa Slough ...
According to "Oregon Geographic Names" (McArthur and McArthur, 2003), Oregon's town of Knappa was named after an early settler Aaron Knapp Jr. The Knappa Post Office operated from 1872 to 1943.

"Knappa (CLATSOP) ... Knappa was named for Aaron Knapp, Jr. He was a pioneer settler who resided in the community for many years. Knappa post office operated from 1872 to 1943. According to Silas B. Smith, the Indian name for the locality was Tle-las-qua."

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records database (2006) shows an Auren Knapp being granted title to 40 acres in T8N R7W Section 8 on June 25, 1872 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry). The database also shows Auren Knapp being granted title to 160.83 acres of T8N R6W Section 7 on January 24, 1890 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry). A Phebe Knapp was granted title to 160 acres of T8N R6W and parts of Sections 7, 17, and 18, on September 5, 1890 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry).

The 1856 cadastral survey (tax survey) for T8N R7W has today's Knappa Slough along with today's Blind Slough labeled "Blind Slough".

The 1862 cadastral survey for T8N R7W also has today's Knappa Slough labeled as "Blind Slough". The area of Knappa Landing (Section 18) was part of the Donation Land Claim (DLC) of Samuel Tallman, 324.82 acres, Claim No.37. Section 8, the eventual claim of Aaron Knapp Jr., was blank.

The 1875 and the 1892 Columbia River Sheet No.2 (Astoria to Tenasillahe Island) had today's Knappa Landing labeled "Warren's Landing". The 1892 map shows the dock.

In 1941 the U.S. Board of Geographic Names made official the name "Knappa Slough".

Not much is left of the early Knappa. On this web author's visit in June 2004, one of the local folk pointed out overgrown corner which once was the bank, and a bushy, treed area where once stood a store and dance hall. Only a couple houses from the 1914 era exist.


Early Warren Slough ...
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records database (2006) shows a J.F. Warren being granted title to 160 acres in T8N R7W Section 28 on April 10, 1882 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry). The database also shows a J.F. Warren being granted title to 160 acres in T8N R8W Section 26 On May 5, 1890 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry).

The GLO database shows Daniel K. Warren being granted title to 9.75 acres in T8N R7W Section 7 on August 5, 1869 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry) and 18.12 acres in T8N R7W Section 8 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry).

The GLO database also shows A.H. Stone, Daniel K. Warren, and George W. Warren being granted title to 80 acres in parts of T8N R7W Sections 8 and 9, on May 2, 1870 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry), and 160 acres of Sections 9, 10, and 15, on June 1, 1870 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry). Alfred H. Stone and George W. Warren were granted title to 151.4 acres in parts of T8N R7W, Sections 3 and 10, and 40 acres in Section 15, on July 15, 1870 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry). George W. Warren was granted title to another 40 acres in T8N R7W Section 15 on April 25, 1871 (1820 Sale-Cash Entry).

The 1860 census for Clatsop County shows a Daniel Warren, age 23, a farmer, from New York. No Warrens appeared on the 1850 census.

The 1875 and the 1892 Columbia River Sheet No.2 (Astoria to Tenasillahe Island) had today's Knappa Landing labeled "Warren's Landing". The 1892 map shows the dock.


Views ...

Image, 2012, Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Old" Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon. Image taken September 22, 2012.
Image, 2008, Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Old" Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon. Image taken February 17, 2008.
Image, 2008, Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Knappa Docks, Knappa, Oregon. Knappa Slough is to the left and Warren Slough to the right, with a private dock in the foreground. Image taken February 17, 2008.
Image, 2008, Home, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Home, Knappa Docks, Knappa, Oregon. View from the "old" Knappa Dock. Image taken February 17, 2008.
Image, 2004, Knappa Slough and Warren Slough, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Knappa dock (private), as seen from Knappa Slough with Warren Slough on the right. Image taken June 16, 2004.
Image, 2008, Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Shoreline, Knappa Docks, Knappa, Oregon. Image taken February 17, 2008.
Image, 2008, Knappa dock, Knappa, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Old building/shed, Knappa Docks, Knappa, Oregon. Image taken February 17, 2008.
Image, 2008, Knappa Slough, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Horned Grebe, Knappa Slough, Oregon. Image taken February 17, 2008.


Knappa, etc.

  • Knappa Docks Site ...
  • Knappa Fire District ...
  • Knappa Landing ...
  • Warren's Landing ...

Knappa Docks Site ...
The Knappa Docks Site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 (Site #84002959). Known as the "Hlilusqahih Site (35CLT37)", it is an Chinookan/Kathlamet Historic-Aboriginal site with the periods of significance between 1000-1499 A.D., 1500-1749 A.D., and 1750-1900 A.D..


Knappa Fire District ...
"Proudly serving the communities of Knappa, Svensen, Burnside, Brownsmead, and Clifton/Bradwood, Oregon."

The Knappa Fire District was formed February 23, 1955 and initially served 12 square miles, had one station (in Knappa), 11 volunteers, and responded to an average of 12 calls a year. Today, the District covers 80 square miles, has three stations (Knappa, Svensen, and Brownsmead), 28 volunteers, and responds to an average of 400 calls per year.

"Today, the Fire District provides services with an average of 28 Volunteers and a career Fire Chief. We typically respond to about 400 calls for service annually. The District comprises of a geographic area of approximately 80 square miles with a population of roughly 3500. Geographically we are the largest Fire District in Clatsop County." [Knappa Fire District, 2019]

Image, 2012, Knappa Fire District, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The Knappa, Svensen, and Burnside Fire Station, Svensen, Oregon. Image taken March 8, 2012.

One of three stations in the district, the Knappa, Svensen, and Burnside station houses "an Engine, a Tender, and a Medium Duty Rescue" (2019).


Knappa Landing ...
Knappa Landing provides access for paddlers and kayakers to the central part of the Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge. There is a small cobble beach between an old dock on the left and a private dock on the right. In the late 1800s Knappa Landing was knowns as "Warren's Landing".


Warren's Landing ...
Warren Slough borders the north side of the Knappa area and enters Knappa Slough just upstream of the dock at Knappa Landing. At one time this area was known as "Warren's Landing".

The 1875 and the 1892 Columbia River Sheet No.2 (Astoria to Tenasillahe Island) had today's Knappa Landing labeled "Warren's Landing". The 1892 map shows the dock.



From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 26, 1805, first draft ...


Clark, November 26, 1805 ...





Clark, March 24, 1806 ...


Lewis, March 24, 1806 ...
This morning we sent out a party of 15, at light, for the meat, and concluded to take breakfast before we set out. they soon returned. we breakfasted and set out at after 9 A. M. [from their camp on Mill Creek, just east of Tongue Point] ...     the tide being out this morning we found some difficulty in passing through the bay [Cathlamet Bay] below the Cathlahmah village [near Knappa, Oregon]; this side of the river is very shallow to the distance of 4 miles from the shore tho' there is a channel sufficient for canoes near S. side. at 1 P. M. we arrived at the Cathlahmah village where we halted and purchased some wappetoe, a dog for the sick, and a hat for one of the men. on one of the seal Islands [islands in Cathlamet Bay, today part of the Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge] opposite to the village of these people thy have scaffolded their dead in canoes elivating them above tidewater mark. ...     at half after 3 P. M. we set out and continued our rout among the seal Islands; not paying much attention we mistook our rout which an Indian perceiving pursued overtook us and put us in the wright channel. ...     we continued our rout along the South side of the river and encamped at an old village of 9 houses opposite to the lower Wackkiacum village [Skamokawa, Washington]. the night was cold tho' wood was abundant after dark two Chinnook men came to us in a small canoe. they remained with us all night. came 15 miles today.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • Hay, K.G., 2004, The Lewis and Clark Columbia River Water Trail, Timber Press, Portland;
  • Knappa Fire District website, 2019;
  • McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, "Oregon Geographic Names", 7th Edition, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland;
  • National Register of Historic Places website, 2004;
  • "Rootsweb.com" website, 2010, Clatsop County;
  • U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office Records (GLO) database, 2006;
  • U.S. GenWeb Project website, 2010;
  • U.S. Geological Survey's Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database, 2006;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/knappa.html
September 2010