Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Hot Springs along the Columbia River"
Includes ... Bonneville Hot Springs ... Carson Hot Springs ... Collins Hot Springs ... Moffetts Hot Springs ... St. Martins Hot Springs ... Shipherds Hot Springs ...
Image, 2013, Carson, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, Carson Mineral Hot Springs Golf and Spa Resort, Carson, Washington. Image taken February 15, 2013.


Geothermal ...
"Moffetts Hot Spring (Bonneville Hot Springs) and St. Martin's Hot Spring to the east near the town of Carson have temperatures of 32C (89.6F) and 49C (120.2F) respectively. These hot springs are structurally controlled and are probably located at the intersection of more than one fracture trend. Recent drilling (2003) near Carson and to the east of the Wind River encountered the highest yet recorded geothermal waters in Washington 81C (178F) at 610 meters (2000 feet). The Ohanapeosh Formation underlies the area and is considered to be an aquaclude due to post depositional formations of zeolites and clays. ...


Source:    R. Gordon Bloomquist, Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, Washington, 2006, "Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Wa.", GHC Bulletin, December 2006

Skamania County ...

HEALTH SPRINGS
Cascade Mountains

Shipherd's and St. Martin's Mineral Springs at Ash, Collins' Hot Springs at Collins and Stevenson Hot Springs at Stevenson on "The North Bank Road."

Patients from the continent wide testify to the curative power of these Cascade Springs, with inspiring environment, mountain air and clear skies; two hours from Portland. Medical specialists in attendance. Good resort hotesl.

Daily, week-end and Sunday excursion rates. Splendid trains.

Passenger Station, 11th and Hoyt Sts.
City Ticket Offices, Third and Morrison Sts., 123 Third St.


Source:    "Sunday Oregonian", May 14, 1910, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries.


"Within the great Columbia forest in this county a number of soda springs are situated. ...

Springs are located up the WInd River valley, about two miles from the Cleo-Tumwater power site and three miles from the "Joe Douthitt" gold and copper mines. As soon as the power company gets its plant in working order it will install a trolley system which will furnish easy and rapid access to the springs and the mines. Four miles east of Stevenson is the SHippard spring, the St. Martin and the Collins spring. The St. Martin spring flows from the earth at a temperature of 110 degrees. It was the first discovered as a healing mineral spring in the county. It was taken up as a claim by the late Isadore St. Martin. ...

In the early '70s, W.J. Hosford opened a store at Columbia Landing, where the Collins Springs hotel now stands. He discovered hot water coming from the ground near his store and put up a small shack over it. ... Captain Belcher took a lease on the land and erected an up to date hotel and bath house. ...

Stevenson hot springs are about three miles northwest of Stevenson, and the water is piped directly into the city. ...

"Five miles west of Stevenson on the North Bank railroad, the Moffit or the Table Rock mineral spring is found. This spring has the reputation of being the finest water for the manufacture of ginger ale and carbonated mineral water in the northwest. Porter Brothers, the railroad contractors, erected a large hotel near this spring with the intention of making a mile race track and other improvements. The hotel was abandoned.

It is not to be doubted that there are many other springs possessed of rare qualities within Skamania county. Prospectors tell of a hot lake lying high up Archer mountain. ..."


Source:    "Oregon Sunday Journal", January 28, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.


"The North Bank Road" ...

SPOKANE, PORTLAND & SEATTLE RAILWAY
"The North Bank Road"

DAILY EXCURSIONS
TO
CASCADE MOUNTAIN RESORTS
AT

Stevenson Hot Springs Hotel, Stevenson, Wash.
Shipherd's Mineral Springs Hotel, Ash, Washington.
Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Collins, Washington.
Jewett Farm Resort, White Salmon, Washington.

ROUND TRIL FARES ...
THREE TRAINS DAILY ...
TICKET OFFICES ...


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", August 28, 1909, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries.



Hot Springs along the Columbia



Bonneville Hot Springs (Moffetts Hot Springs) ...
Moffetts Hot Spring, today the location of the Bonneville Hot Springs Resort north of North Bonneville, Washington, has water temperatures of 89.6F.

Natural Table Water.

"Five miles west of Stevenson on the North Bank railroad, the Moffit or the Table Rock mineral spring is found. This spring has the reputation of being the finest water for the manufacture of ginger ale and carbonated mineral water in the northwest. Porter Brothers, the railroad contractors, erected a large hotel near this spring with the intention of making a mile race track and other improvements. The hotel was abandoned."


Source:    "Oregon Sunday Journal", January 28, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.


The Cascade Springs.

"The Cascade Mineral Springs were discovered in the year 1880, by Mr. R.J. Snow, an old miner who was engaged at the time in hauling wood to the Cascade steamboat landing. He crossed a little rill which he approached for the purpose of obtaining a drink. He found the water quite warm, and on tracing it to the source, he found several bubbling springs of sparkling water of nearly a hundred degrees of temperature. The attention of Mr. Thomas Moffett, who was keeping a store at the Cascades at the time, was called to the discovery, and he, recognizing the value, lost no time in acquiring an interest by furnishing money to acquire title to the land from the government, under the mineral land laws. ...   In 1882 Mr. MOffett built the house shown in the accompanying cut, and since that time, during the vacation season, it has been overcrowded with guests, and hundreds have been turned away each season for want of accommodation. Mr. Moffett has now awakened to the true situation, and having freed his hands for the purpose by the sale of the outpur for bottling, will provide all the conveniences required for those who demand accommodations at his hostelry. ...

There is the usual amount of natural gas contained in mineral waters, but no trace of either vegetable or animal matter.

The temperature at the springs is 96 degrees.

The bath houses are on a level with the hotel. ...

The water if furnished to consumers in syphon bottles at $1.20 a dozen, or 10c each. ...

The Cascade Mineral Springs are located in the shade of giant forest trees, on the Washington side of the Columbia river, between the Middle and Upper Cascades, about a mile back from the river bank, and the sparkling water bubbles up from several crystal springs so favorably located that there is no possible chance of contamination.

The springs can be reached twice a day by steamer; and, when a new hotel is erected, the O.R. & N. Co. have signified a desire of placing a transport service from Bonneville to Moffett's Landing. This will add six trains a day to the transportaion facilities of the springs.

When the location is considered it seems more than probable that the Springs are fed direct from nature's crucible that burns beneath the snowy capped summit of Mt. St. Helens, where all the earth properties of nature are boiling, bubbling and burning in chaotic state, and through the little channels of which the springs are the vent holes, comes flowing almost boiling water, impregnated with curative powers unequalled by the science of physic.

Indian tradition, handed down from tribe to tribe, says: "Ages ago pilgrimages were made to this treasure-spot -- for as such it was known -- by the different tribes, and ere the advent of the white man, the Rogue Rivers, the Chitcoes, the Calapoias, Klamaths, and even the Makahs, or water Indian of the coast, brought their aged and decrepit, via the "Bridge of the Gods," to this fabled fountain of youth."


1900, Cascade Springs House, Washington
Click image to enlarge
HISTORICAL ILLUSTRATION: "Cascade Springs House".
Source: "The Cascade Springs", IN: "Oregon Native Son", October 1900, Oregon Native Son Publishing, Portland, Oregon.


Source:    "The Cascade Springs", IN: "Oregon Native Son", October 1900, Oregon Native Son Publishing, Portland, Oregon.


"Cascade Springs for a good vacation. Hot baths inside of hotel. Salmon trout in abundance. Regulator line to Moffett's."


Source:    "Sunday Oregonian", October 20, 1901, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries.

"Historical records indicate the springs were first used by the Native American Indian tribes living in the area and that tribes such as the Rogue River, Chitcoe, Calapoi, Klamath and Makah would travel to this treasured spot, bringing their sick and aged to bathe in, and drink the waters.

Discovery of the spring by European settlers was in 1880 by an old miner, Mr. R.J. Snow. A local merchant, Mr. Thomas Moffett, who was keeping a store at the Cascades at the time, recognized the value of the springs and acquired an interest in the springs. In 1881, Mr. Moffett built the Cascade Springs Hotel and in 1885 began selling the bottled water for 10 cents per bottle. ...

From its early beginnings the spring changed ownership and even name when the town changed from Moffetts, Washington to North Bonneville in 1934. It also saw several episodes of growth including the building of a new hotel in 1932 to replace the original structure that had been destroyed by fire. Sub-sequent development included the addition of a dozen cabins and a 38-acre campground with 75 electrical hookups.

However, by ... the late 1970s, there was little remaining of the glory days of the 20s and 30s. Only a few cabins remained and the entire facility was in disrepair ...

But, in 1990, ... a new owner ... was about to change all of that and Bonneville Hot Springs Resort is once again one of the jewels of the Columbia Gorge. ...

The Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, Spa and Converence Center was completed in 2002. The 12,000 square foot facility is located on the site of the original Moffetts Hotel and Bottling Works. ...

The geothermal water is used directly in some of the soaking tubs and large pools. As needed, the temperature is boosted using geothermal heat pumps. Heating for the facility is also provided through the use of geothermal heat pumps with heat being distributed through a forced-air system. ...

The rebuilding of the Bonneville Hot Springs Resort on the site of the original 1881 Moffett Hot Springs Hotel continues over a century of geothermal use in this scenic area of the Columbia River Gorge. ..."


Source:    R. Gordon Bloomquist, Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, Washington, 2006, "Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Wa.", GHC Bulletin, December 2006.


"It wasnt until 1880 when European settler, R.J. Snow, discovered the springs here at Bonneville and told his friend, Thomas Moffett. Moffett, who quickly recognized the value of our waters, built Cascade Springs Hotel in 1881, and in 1885, started selling the water for 10 cents per bottle. Researchers, such as renowned chemist J.H. Fisk and the US Chemical Assayers from Washington DC, performed numerous chemical analyses of the waters and all agreed that the mineral content in these waters have potential good health qualities. News of this spread quickly and people from all across the country came to drink and bathe in the waters that could help with their kidney complaints, liver problems, dyspepsia, rheumatism, dropsy or general debility.

But in the early 1930s, a fire destroyed Cascade Springs Hotel. Under new ownership, a new hotel was built in 1932 and was given the name Biba Hot Springs. It included a dozen cabins and a 38-acre campground with 75 electrical hookups. However, by the 1970s, there was little remaining of the glory days of the 20s and 30s. Only a few cabins remained and the entire facility was in disrepair.

It was during this time that current owner, Pete Cam, first visited Biba to find relief for his severe case of rheumatoid arthritis in his legs. After a week of soaking, he was able to walk on his own and to this day Pete still soaks in the mineral water daily and continues to enjoy good healthon his own feet.

Pete bought this property in 1989 and over the next 13 years worked to create a getaway place for people to enjoy the healing waters. On October 26, 2002, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort and Spa opened its doors for the first time. Since then we have seen countless guests use our waters for health, healing and wellness."


Source:    Bonneville Hot Springs Resort and Spa website, 2014.


Penny Postcard, Moffett's Hot Springs, Washington
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Moffetts Hot Springs, North Bonneville, Washington.
Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back, "Moffett's Hot Springs - North Bonneville - Wash." Smith. Card P-821. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2014, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington. Image taken March 21, 2014.
Image, 2014, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington. Image taken March 21, 2014.
Image, 2014, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington. Image taken March 21, 2014.
Image, 2014, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
12th tee, Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Washington. Image taken March 21, 2014.


Carson Hot Springs (St. Martins Hot Springs) ...
St. Martin's Hot Spring, today a part of the Carson Mineral Hot Springs Spa and Golf Resort, located northeast of the Washington town of Carson, has water temperatures of 120F.

According to the "Sunday Oregonian", October 8, 1911:   "The Martins and the Shipherd Minerals Springs are within one mile of Carson, and the Government Springs are one mile away."

[More Carson]

Carson Hot Springs.

"Carson Hot Springs were discovered in 1876 by Isadore St. Martin. While on a hunting expedition with a friend, St. Martin noticed steam along the river and found the hot springs bubbling up among the rocks. They marked the spot and St. Martin later filed an Indian Homestead claim on the site.

St. Martin took his wife, Margaret, who suffered from neuralgia, to the hot springs. News of her relief spread rapidly and people began to arrive in great numbers to bathe in the springs. Those early bathers navigated up the Wind River to the original bathhouses.

In 1897, St. Martin began construction of the Historical Hotel, completing it in 1901. The cabins and bathhouse were added in 1923 and are still being used."


Source:    Carson Mineral Hot Springs Golf & Spa Resort website, 2013.



Isadore St. Martin.

"Isadore St. Martin spent his boyhood at home, assisting his father in clearing and cultivating the land until the early '60s, when he went to The Dalles, Oregon, and engaged in packing supplies to the mines at Canyon City. In this work he used a large string of pack horses, and, being a great lover of horses, maintained a splendid outfit. He lived at The Dalles until the spring of 1873, when he came to Skamania county, Washington, and took up a homestead six miles east of Stevenson. The land was covered with heavy timber, and after building a log house, he began the task of clearing the place, for which purpose he used oxen, hauling his logs to the Grant & Stone sawmill at Sprague, Washington. In the course of time he got a goodly part of the land cleared and he carried on its cultivation with success. On this land are fine medicinal hot springs, which he realized were of great value if properly utilized. To this end, he began to advertise their location and value, erecting cabins, tents and other accommodations, and met with such encouraging success that in 1898 he erected a large hotel and a number of bath houses, cleared off and beautified the surrounding grounds, and developed the place into one of the most attractive resorts in the northwest. St. Martin Springs, as the place is now widely known, has been patronized by thousands who have here found an ideal place to recuperate under pleasant and inviting environment, and the springs are patronized by people from all parts of the northwest and California, Mr. St. Martin continued to give the ranch and springs his personal attention until his death, which occurred March 10, 1910, and was deeply regretted not only by the people of his immediate community, who had found him to be a man of worthy life and dependable character, but also by many of his former guests with whom he had formed lasting friendships. "


Source:    The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1928, History of the Columbia River Valley From The Dalles to the Sea, Vol. III".


Image, 2013, Carson, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Carson Hot Springs Resort, Carson, Washington. Image taken February 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Carson, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Hotel St. Martin, Carson Hot Springs Resort, Carson, Washington. Hotel St. Martin was built in 1901. The bathhouse is the building on the right. Image taken February 15, 2013.
Image, 2013, Carson, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
St. Martin's Hot Springs Hotel, Carson, Washington. Image taken February 15, 2013.


Collins Hot Springs ...
The Collins Hot Spring and the site of the Collins Hot Springs Resort were located near Collins Point, Washington, and today are under the waters of Bonneville Reservoir. The resort boasted spring waters of 120F.

Discovered by Hosford.

"In the early '70s, W.J. Hosford opened a store at Columbia Landing, where the Collins Springs hotel now stands. He discovered hot water coming from the ground near his store and put up a small shack over it. The guest who wished to take a mineral bath could go to the building and take a plung. This continued for a few years until Captain Belcher took a lease on the land and erected an up to date hotel and bath house."


Source:    "Oregon Sunday Journal", January 28, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.


Collins Hot Springs.

"C.T. Belcher, who at one time was interested with the St. Charles people in developing a hot spring on the old Woodard place on Nelson Creek, has secured a 15-year lease from the O.R. & N. company, contingent upon finding within 90 days the vein of hot water at the Collins springs above high water mark. This Mr. Belcher is trying to do. If he succeeds he intends to put up a $15,000 hotel and bath house. -- Pioneer."


Source:    "Hood River Glacier", Hood River, Oregon, February 6, 1903, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2015.


COLLINS HOT SPRINGS
On the Columbia River.

Hotel modern in every respect, electric light, steam heat, billiard parlor, bowling alley, dance pavilion and every convenience. Location beautiful, fine view of the mountains and river, good fishing and hunting. Address C.T. Belcher, manager, Collins Hot Springs, Collins, Wash.



Source:    "Sunday Oregonian", August 9, 1908, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.

Collins Hot Springs is Popular Resort.
Well-Equipped Baths and Modern Hotel Are Located on North Bank of Columbia.

"Marked improvements have been made at Collins Springs on the Columbia River, in Skamania County, Wash., and the management has more attractions to offer the vacationist this season than in previous years. A three-story annex to the hotel has been completed and is fitted with all modern conveniences, nearly all the rooms being equipped with private baths.

The entire hotel has been remodeled and refurnished ... New bathhouses have been constructed and are supplied with every feature for the convenience of patrons.

The resort is situated a few hundred feet from the Columbia River and in addition to the boating facilities on the river, aquatic sports and fishing are enjoyed on the three small lakes above the springs. A gasoline launch has been placed in commission and rides up and down the river are provided. The North Bank road passes through the property, the station being but two blocks from the hotel.

The waters of Collins Springs have medicinal qualities which, in addition to the restful surroundings, make the resort attractive. The estate is equipped with an electric lighting plant and at night the place is illuminated like the business district of the city. ..."


Source:    "The Oregonian", Portland, Oregon, June 11, 1911, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2014.


COLLINS HOT SPRING
Collins, Wash.

Delightful mountain resort. Beautiful scenery. Good hunting and fishing.

Hot mineral baths, excellent for rheumatism, stomach and liver troubles. Fine new bath house with lady and gentlemen attendants. A perfect health resort. Accommodations unsurpassed.

Take North Bank road or Upper Columbia River boats.

Rates on application.

F.A. YOUNG, Proprietor.



Source:    "Sunday Oregonian", July 21, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.

Penny Postcard, Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Washington
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Collins Hot Mineral Springs Hotel, Collins, Washington.
Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back, "Hotel at Collins Hot Mineral Springs, Collins Wa." In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Washington
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Collins, Washington.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Collins, Wash." Postmarked 1913. Card R-31153. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Washington
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Veranda, Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Collins, Washington.
Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Veranda, Collins Hot Springs Hotel, Collins, Wash." Card R-31155. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Bailey Gatzert
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Penny Postcard: Steamer "Bailey Gatzert" on excursion trip up the Columbia River. Penny Postcard, Divided Back (1907-1915), "Steamer Bailey Gatzert on excursion trip up Columbia River. landing near Collins Hot Springs. Washington.". Published by Louis Scheiner, Portland, Oregon. Made in U.S.A. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Government Mineral Springs ...
Government Mineral Springs was a developed hot springs resort located less than twenty miles north of the Columbia River.

According to the "Sunday Oregonian", October 8, 1911:   "The Martins and the Shipherd Minerals Springs are within one mile of Carson, and the Government Springs are one mile away."

"Recreational users were drawn to Government Mineral Springs early in the 20th century, and established informal camping grounds near the Guard Station. In 1910, S.D. Fox and the Star Brewing Company of Portland began construction of a 50-room hotel at the soda springs near Trapper Creek, which eventually became known as Government Mineral Springs. The popular resort boasted bath houses, Iron Mike Bubbling Springs, a dance pavilion, store, ice cream parlor, goldfish ponds, and flower gardens. Early advertisements for the resort claimed the mineral water spas were capable of curing physical ailments such as gallstones, rheumatism, diabetes and anemia, as well as stomach, liver, kidney, skin, and nervous disorders. In 1935, the hotel burned to the ground.

Camping remained popular at the site, and in 1937 and 1938 the Civilian Conservation Corps significantly expanded and developed the public campground. The guard station was built in 1937 by CCC enrollees from Company 944, based at Camp Hemlock, near the community of Stabler. The purpose of the guard station was for Forest Service administration of the campground and other local recreational use. Alfred Albert was the first guard stationed in the cabin. Mr. Albert, his wife, and two children lived at the guard station during the summers of 1937 and 1938."


Source:    U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest website, 2016.


Government Mineral Springs Hotel, Washington
Click image to enlarge
NEWSPAPER: Government Mineral Springs Hotel, Washington.
"Government Mineral Springs Hotel", Sunday Oregonian, August 15, 1920, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Shipherds Hot Springs ...
Shipherds Hot Springs was located near Carson, Washington.

According to the "Sunday Oregonian", October 8, 1911:   "The Martins and the Shipherd Minerals Springs are within one mile of Carson, and the Government Springs are one mile away."

Health and Recreation
Spend Your Vacation at
--- THE FAMOUS ---
SHIPHERD'S
HOT SPRINGS

Carson, Wash., "In the Heart of the Cascade Mountains," and build up your health. Fishing, Dancing, Bowling, Quoits, Tennis and Croquet Grounds.

HOT MINERAL WATER SWIMMING POOL

Saddle ponies, Tally-ho for fishing and picnix parties. Many nice improvements made during past year.


Write for booklet.
E.L. SHIPHERD, Manager


Source:    "The Sunday Oregonian", July 12, 1914, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


"Amos St. Martin [son of Isadore and Margaret St. Martin], born in 1871, died in 1911. Amos married Grace Underwood and one daughter was born to this marriage, Katherine St. Martin. ...

Amos St. Martin homesteaded 160 acres north of his father's property. In 1911, he built the hotel bathhouses, dance hall, bowling alley and swimming pool. Amos sold his place to a Mr. Shipherd who built the springs known as "Shipherd's Hot Springs". There were 80 acres in this deal. 80 acres were sold to Isadore and Margaret St. Martin, Amos' father and mother. The purchase from Amos was called the Protection 80 acres. It made the St. Martin Springs property 240 acres. The Shipherd's Hot Springs was later bought by a few members of the St. Martin family who operated it until the hotel burned down in December of 1929. The building was never rebuilt."


Source:    Luther St. Martin, 1987, "St. Martin", Carson Printing.


Penny Postcard, Shipherds Hot Springs Hotel, Carson, Washington
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Shipherd's Hot Springs Hotel, Carson, Washington.
Penny Postcard, Real Photo, Divided Back, "Shipherd's Hot Springs Hotel - Carson, Wash." Card #148. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Stevenson Hot Springs ...

"Stevenson hot springs are about three miles northwest of Stevenson, and the water is piped directly into the city."


Source:    "Oregon Sunday Journal", January 28, 1912, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.

STEVENSON HOT SPRINGS
Hotel and Sanatorium
Stevenson, Wash.

"Reached by the North Bank Railway or DDalles steamers; only two hours from Portland, and only two blocks from depot at Stevenson. Plain, Turkish and Russian mineral baths. Experienced bath attendants. First-class hotel service. Electric light, steam heat. New and modern. Rates reasonable."


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", August 28, 1909, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.


1910, Stevenson Hot Springs Hotel, Washington
Click image to enlarge
HISTORICAL ADVERTISING: "Stevenson Hot Springs Hotel".
Source: "Sunday Oregonian", May 22, 1910, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2019.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 30, 1805 ...





Clark, April 13, 1806 ...




Columbia River GorgeReturn to
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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • "bonnevilleresort.com" website, 2014;
  • Carson Mineral Hot Springs Golf & Spa Resort website, 2013;
  • "The Cascade Springs", IN: "Oregon Native Son", October 1900, Oregon Native Son Publishing, Portland, Oregon;
  • Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019;
  • Bloomquist, R.G., 2006, Washington State University Energy Program, Olympia, Washington, 2006, "Bonneville Hot Springs Resort, North Bonneville, Wa.", GHC Bulletin, December 2006;
  • "rootsweb.com" website, 2013;
  • U.S. Forest Service, Gifford Pinchot National Forest website, 2016;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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September 2015