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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Hood River, Oregon ... (the city)"
Includes ... City of Hood River ... Hood River ... Hood River - Underwood Ferry ... Hood River Toll Bridge ... Hood River Train Depot ... Mount Hood Hotel Annex ... Hood River Hotel ... Mount Hood Railroad Linear Historic District ... Waucoma Hotel ... Hotel Oregon ... Panorama Point ... The Golden Age of Postcards ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Welcome to Hood River, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken April 9, 2015.


The City of Hood River ...
The City of Hood River developed along the banks of the Hood River, located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 169.5, twenty-two miles upstream of the Bonneville Dam. The river, the City of Hood River, and Hood River County were all named after Mount Hood, which is visible from the Columbia River. Mount Hood was named after the British admiral Lord Samuel Hood in 1792 by Lieutenant Broughton of the Captain George Vancouver Expedition.

Locale ...
Upstream from Hood River is the small town of Mosier, Rowena Gap, and Mayer State Park. Twenty miles upstream is The Dalles, Oregon. Downstream from Hood River is the Columbia Gorge Hotel, Ruthton Point, and Mitchell Point. The Washington communities of White Salmon, Bingen, and Underwood are across the Columbia River.

Image, 2006, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Hood River, Oregon, from the Cook-Underwood Road, Washington. Image taken May 10, 2006.


Early Hood River ...
The first permanent settlers in the Hood River area filed a Donation Land Claim in 1854. By 1880 seventeen families lived in the region.

The Hood River Post Office was established in September 1858.

In 1881 the City of Hood River was platted, and in 1908 Hood River County was created. The City of Hood River has been the county seat since the county's creation.


Hood River and the Automobile ...
"... The first automobile introduced into town (ca.1905) was nicknamed the 'potato bug'. Residents were amused at the new device as it wistfully chugged down the hill from the Heights to downtown and then had to be pulled back up the hill by a team of horses. The town boasted of 71 cars in 1910 and had passed an ordinance limiting the speed of the automobiles to 10 miles per hour. By 1911, 117 cars were in Hood River; ranking fifth in the number of autos in the entire state. Portland had 3,208 autos at that time (Hood River News, 14 December 1911). ..."

Source:    Mount Hood Hotel Annex National Register of Historical Places Nomination Form, 1994, #93001511

Historic Columbia River Highway ...
[More Historic Columbia River Highway]
[More HCRH Route]

  • HMP 65.8 - 67 ... Hood River
  • HMP 66.80 ... Hood River Bridge (1918)
  • HMP 67.07 to 67.6 ... Hood River Loops (1920)
  • HMP 68.1 ... Mark O. Hatfield West Trailhead, HCRH State Trail (1999)

Views along the Historic Highway route ...

Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cascade and Oak, Historic Columbia River Highway, Hood River, Oregon. Route of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken April 9, 2015.


"The original highway in the city of Hood River is on portions of Cascade Drive, Oak Street, Front Street, and State Street." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Residential street scene, heading east along the Historic Columbia River Highway, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Downtown street scene, heading east along the Historic Columbia River Highway, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Oregon Highway 30 bridge across Hood River, Hood River, Oregon. Replacement bridge on the route of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Oregon Highway 30 bridge across Hood River, Hood River, Oregon. Replacement bridge on the route of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Hood River Loops, Historic Columbia River Highway, Hood River, Oregon. View going uphill. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Hood River Loops, Historic Columbia River Highway, Hood River, Oregon. View going uphill. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Senator Mark O. Hatfield West Trailhead, HCRH State Trail, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken April 9, 2015.


Hood River, etc.

  • History Museum ...
  • Hood River to Underwood Ferry ...
  • Hood River to White Salmon Ferry ...
  • Hood River Toll Bridge ...
  • Hood River Railroad Depots ...
  • Mount Hood Railroad and the Mount Hood Railroad Linear Historic District ...
  • Mount Hood Hotel Annex (Hood River Hotel) ...
  • Nichols Basin ...
  • Panorama Point ...
  • Stone Chimney ...
  • Waucoma Hotel (Hotel Oregon) ...
  • Street Scenes ...


The History Museum ...
Hood River's History Museum lies on the north side of Interstate 84 and is nestled between Hood River on the west and the Hood River marina on the east. The paddle wheel of the steamboat "Henderson" is prominently displayed outside the Museum.
[More]

Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Exhibit, Parkdale, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
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Exhibits, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Hood River to Underwood Ferry ...
In the early 1900s a ferry took passengers from Hood River, Oregon, to Underwood, Washington.

The March 2, 1911 "Hood River Glacier" reported a new 51-foot-long and 11-foot-wide, 40-horsepower gas engine launch called the "Beaver" was placed in commission on March 1, 1911. The new ferry's upper deck was covered with canvas and arranged with seats for 50 passengers, while the cabin accommodated 25 passengers and had hair-stuffed leather cushioned seats, linoleum carpet, and electric lights.

NEW LAUNCH ON UNDERWOOD FERRY

The new launch, Beaver, of Underwood, built for Olsen & Treiber by an Astoria firm, arrived at Underwood last wee. Capt. Olsen was in charge and chief engineer Carner at the engines.

The Beaver is 51 feet long, 11 feet 4 inches beam and 4 foot draft. She carries 50 Horse Power engine, is fitted with electric lights, electric search light, a deep water Bliss Boston compass and is controlled by compressed air from the pilot house. ...   The after cabin is arranged very nicely, being entirely separate from the engine room: it has hair-stuffed leather cushioned seats, linoleum on the floor and electric lights on the ceiling. This cabin will seat 25 passengers. The engine room is modern and equipped with the best machinery made. The pilot house is a very interesting room with its controlling levers, wheels, switches, switch board, compass, guages, bells and whistle string.

The Beaver was placed in commission on March 1 on the Hood River and Underwood ferry and will be prepared to make excursions to any part of the Columbia river from The Dalles to Astoria either day or night. She can accommodate a party of from 6 up. ...  

The "Beaver" is one of the fastest launches on the Columbia. The Beaver's actual running time from Portland to Underwood was seven hours and ten minutes and was made, with the exception of the Locks, without a stop of an alteration of the speed of the engine."


Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", March 2, 1911, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.



North Bank Trains Change Time
Leaving Underwood
EAST BOUND, 11:21 A.M. and 8:28 P.M.
WEST BOUND, 6:56 A.M. and 3:10 P.M.

Take the Ferry North of O.-W. R. & N. Depot

The Fish Hatchery is now running at Underwood for salmon and is a very interesting sight. Passengers will be landed at the hatchery upon requenst without extra charge.

HOOD RIVER - UNDERWOOD FERRY
CAPT. OTIS TREIBER, Ferryman



Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", October 5, 1911, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Hood River - Underwood Ferry

The Hood River - Underwood Ferry System began Monday to land on the sand bar north of the O-W. R. & N. station instead of the Hood River - White Salmon ferry landing.

When you want to cross raise the flag.

Bert Kent, Ferryman."



Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", September 30, 1915, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Hood River to White Salmon Ferry ...

"The following schedule of rates of ferriage for the Hood River and White Salmon ferry was approved:

Wagon and two horses one way ... $1.50
Wagon and two horses round trip ... 2.50
Wagon and one horse one way ... 1.00
Wagon and one horse round trip ... 1.00
Saddle horse and rider ... 1.00
Loose stock per head ... 75
Passengers ... 25."


Source:    "The Dalles Daily Chronicle", April 14, 1891, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


Visit your Washington Neighbors

"Reasonable Fares on Hood River - White Salmon Ferry. Augomobile, including up to four passengers, $1.00, plus 3c war tax. Single passengers, 25c."


Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", August 12, 1920, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


"The wind was so strong several days that the Rowena-Lyle ferry east of here was forced to tie up. The gales had no effect on the big ferry of the Hood River-White Salmon Ferry Co."


Source:    "The Hood River Glacier", August 11, 1921, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspaper Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.

Hood River Toll Bridge ...
The Hood River Toll Bridge was built in 1924 and connects White Salmon and Bingen, Washington, with Hood River, Oregon. A lift span was added to the bridge in 1938 to respond to raised water elevations in the pool behind Bonneville Dam. The bridge is a steel structure with a narrow roadway deck width of approximately 18 feet 9 inches.

Image, 2006, Mount Hood and the Hood River Bridge, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood and the Hood River Interstate Bridge. View from the Hood River Bridge, connecting Bingen/White Salmon, Washington. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Image, 2006, Crossing the Hood River Bridge, click to enlarge
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Crossing the Interstate Bridge heading into Hood River, Oregon. View through front window of car. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Image, 2010, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Pay station, Hood River Toll Bridge, heading into Hood River, Oregon. View from the north, before entering Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2010.


Hood River Depots ...
Three Railroad Depots existed in Hood River, Oregon.

In 1882 the Oregon - Washington Railway and Navigation Company's (O.W.R. & N.) Hood River Passenger Station and the Union Pacific Railway Depot was built at the foot of First Street. The Mount Hood Hotel (today only the Mount Hood Hotel Annex remains) was located just south of this depot. This depot was razed in 1911 to provide room for the new O.W.R. & N. depot, today the home of the Mount Hood Railroad Company.

Between 1906 and 1910, a 23-mile-long independent railway track known as the "Mount Hood Railroad" was built connecting Hood River with Parkdale. In 1906 their Hood River depot was built east of the O.W.R. & N.'s depot. It was torn down between 1971 and 1972. In 1993 the tracks of this line were listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Mount Hood Railroad Linear Historic District #93001507).

In 1911 the 1882 O.W.R. & N. depot was razed and the current building was built. This depot is still in existence and now houses the Mount Hood Railroad Company. In 1988 the O.W.R. & N. depot was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Event, Architecture/Engineering, #88001159).

[More]


Penny Postcard, Depot, Hood River, Oregon, ca.1900s
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Penny Postcard: Original two Depots at Hood River, Oregon, (Mount Hood Railroad Depot, front and the O.W.R. & N. Depot, behind) plus the Mount Hood Hotel (background left), ca.1906-1910.
Penny Postcard, "View of Hood River R.R. Depot, O.R. and N. Depot and Mt. Hood Hotel, Hood River, Oregon". Made in Germany, Sprouse & Son, Importers and Publishers, Tacoma, Washington, Card #129143. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Mount Hood Railroad Company Depot ...
The Mount Hood Railroad Company's Depot, located at the end of First Street, was once the Oregon - Washington Railway and Navigation Company's (O.W.R. & N.) Hood River Passenger Station and the Union Pacific Railway Depot for Hood River, Oregon. It is a fine example of Craftsman style architecture. In 1988 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Event, Architecture/Engineering, #88001159).
[More]

Image, 2013, Mount Hood Railroad Depot, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood Railroad Depot, Hood River, Oregon. View from the east. Image taken March 18, 2013.
Image, 2013, Mount Hood Railroad Depot, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood Railroad Depot, Hood River, Oregon. View from the east. Image taken March 18, 2013.


Mount Hood Railroad and the Mount Hood Railroad Linear Historic District ...
The Mount Hood Railroad was initially incorporated October 1905 and opened for business in May 1906, with the tracks running from Hood River to Dee. By 1909 the tracks extended to Parkdale, a distance of 21 miles. In 1968 the Union Pacific acquired the line, operating it until 1987 when they sold the line to local investors where it was reorganized under the original name. In 2008 the line was again sold, this time to the Chicago-based Iowa Pacific Holdings. Today the railroad offers four-hour scenic tours through the Hood River Valley and narrated historic excursion train tours, as well as special events. There are views of Mount Hood and Mount Adams along with the surrounding orchards and farmland of the Hood River Valley.

In 1994 the old Mount Hood Railroad line between Hood River and Parkdale, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Industry, Agriculture, Transportation #93001507).

[More]


Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mount Hood Railroad, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken March 18, 2013.
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Mount Hood Railroad, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken March 18, 2013.

SLRG 509 dome car (see more below), MH 2920 "Wahkeena" passenger car (formerly RPCX 2920), and engine MH 02.


Mount Hood Hotel ...
The grand Mount Hood Hotel was built in 1881, the same year the town of Hood River was platted. Business was booming and in 1886 the modest hotel was enlarged to a three-story structure crowned by an observation tower which was encircled by a double veranda overlooking the Columbia River and the Oregon-Washington Railroad and Navigation Company's passenger station. The Mount Hood Hotel became a pominent structure viewed by travelers arriving by steamboat or train. With the popularity of the automobile and the construction of the Columbia River Highway, the Mount Hood Hotel lost favor to it's annex, located on the new Highway. The Mount Hood Hotel was closed after 1926 and was razed about 1930. Its site is now parking space for the former annex, which was renamed Hood River Hotel.

"... The Mt. Hood Hotel Annex symbolizes the transition from a railroad dependent community to an automobile oriented town. The Annex was built facing Oak Street, which became Hood River's section of the Columbia River Highway. Businesses along Oak Street were highly visible to motor vehicle traffic. The construction of the Annex coincided with the beginning of the automobile era when the majority of the new businesses in Hood River served the automobilist.

The original Mt. Hood Hotel was built in 1881, the same year the town of Hood River was platted. The hotel was strategically sited adjacent to the railroad depot, the main means of transportation until the second decade of the 20th century. The hotel was a gathering place for visitors and towns people alike. Socializing took place at the hotel, and many business deals were made in the lobby. The hotel gained fame as a destination resort as well as a stopping point for people traveling to other locations in the valley. As Hood River became known throughout the country for its successful fruit industry and for its scenic beauty, the Mt. Hood Hotel expanded.

The Mt. Hood Hotel Annex was built just south of the original hotel in response to the increase in tourism and the new business created by fruit and timber industries. In addition, Hood River's population tripled from 1900 to 1915. The Annex originally housed four commercial stores, apartments for Hood River workers, and additional guest rooms for tourists.

In 1926, the main lobby was moved from the original hotel to the Mt. Hood Hotel Annex. The new lobby opened on the same day as the official dedication of the newly completed Mt. Hood Loop Highway. ..."

Source:    Mount Hood Hotel Annex National Register of Historical Places Nomination Form, 1994, #93001511


Mount Hood Hotel Annex (Hood River Hotel) ...
Today's Hood River Hotel, located on the corner of First and Oak Streets, was once the historic Mount Hood Hotel Annex. This 20th Century "Commercial Style" building was constructed in 1911-1912 just south of the original hotel. Initial plans included a large convention and opera hall, a billiards hall, and a bowling alley, none of which were never built. The building instead housed four commercial stores, apartments for Hood River workers, and additional guest rooms for tourists. There was an aerial passage between the Mount Hood Hotel and the "annex".

As the automobile era began the "annex building" became more important than the main Hotel. The automobile replaced the steamboats and passenger trains, making the grand old Mount Hood Hotel obsolete. The Columbia River Highway reached Hood River in 1915 with the trip from Portland to Hood River taking only four to five hours on the average. Over 100 cars a day passed through Hood River that first year. The Mount Hood Hotel Annex fronted on this new highway. In 1926 the main lobby of the Mount Hood Hotel was moved from the original hotel to the Mount Hood Hotel Annex. This new lobby opened on the same day as the official dedication of the newly completed Mount Hood Loop Highway. The old Hotel was essential obsolete and was razed about 1930. Its site is now parking space for the former annex, which was renamed Hood River Hotel.

In 1994 the Mount Hood Hotel Annex was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Event, Person, #93001511).


Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Mount Hood Hotel Annex (now the Hood River Hotel), Hood River, Oregon. Image taken March 18, 2013.
Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Mount Hood Hotel Annex (now the Hood River Hotel), Hood River, Oregon. View is from the northeast with the Hotel's parking area, formerly the location of the grand Mount Hood Hotel, in the foreground. Image taken March 18, 2013.
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Historic Mount Hood Hotel Annex (now the Hood River Hotel), Hood River, Oregon. Parking lot is the location of the original Mount Hood Hotel. Image taken March 18, 2013.
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Historic Mount Hood Hotel Annex (now the Hood River Hotel), Hood River, Oregon. Image taken March 18, 2013.


Nichols Basin ...
Nichols Basin lies on the Hood River delta, just west of the mouth of Hood River. It once was the water basin for the Nichols Boat Works.

According to the "HistoricHoodRiver.com" website (2016), early on the area of Nichols Basin was a ferry/steamboat landing.

"At high water steamships could come right up to this landing just north of the train station, roughly the location of the present Nichols Basin. The modern sternwheeler Queen of the West docked regularly at the Port of Hood River's cruise ship dock in the Nichols Basin just to the north of this spot until the November 2006 floods blocked the entrance with over a million cubic yards of sand and rock." ["HistoricHoodRiver.com" website, 2016]

Nichols Basin was once the water basin for the Nichols Boat Works.

"NBBB [Nichols Bros. Boat Builders] has been building boats on beautiful Whidbey Island since 1964. We are located in Freeland, WA where we produce state-of-the-art vessels; tugs, ferries, fire boats, fishing vessels, barges, dinner boats, along with many other sophisticated ships. However it didn't all start on Whidbey Island, in fact Nichols Brothers evolved from Nichols Boat Works which was incorporated by Mark Nichols and son Frank Nichols in 1939 at Hood River, Oregon, on the Columbia River." [Nichols Bros. Boat Builders website, 2016]

"Nichols Boat Works was established in 1939. In 1964, the company opened a second new construction yard, in Freeland WA, now known as Nichols Bros. Boat Builders, where they build larger and more complex boats. The Hood River yard closed in 1998 and the site was razed in 2008." ["ShipbuildingHistory.com" website, 2016]

"The Boat Basin has been used for the Nichols Boat Works for construction and repair of boats since 1941. The original pier and upland to the west ... was used for marina facilities for private vessels, with a floating gas station, and then was also the original location of the repair works until the southern end of the basin was filled in during the late 1960s and early 1970s for the subsequent operation of Nichols Boat Works. Both shipbuilding and sandblasting occurred on the site, and vessels including tugboats, towboats, and barges were constructed up until 1998. A floating gas station and then two land-based gas stations were located on the site. One gas station still remains to the southwest of the Boat Basin." ["PortOfHoodRiver.com" website, 2016, Tetra Tech, Inc. Memorandum, June 1, 2009]

Image, 2016, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Nichols Basin, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken February 8, 2016.
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Frog, Nichols Basin, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken February 8, 2016.


Panorama Point ...
(to come)


Stone Chimney ...
???

Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Old stone chimney, Hood River, Oregon. West side of town, seen at end of Interstate 84 exit to Westcliff Drive. Image taken November 10, 2014.
Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Old stone chimney, Hood River, Oregon. West side of town, seen at end of Interstate 84 exit to Westcliff Drive. Image taken November 10, 2014.


Waucoma Hotel (Hotel Oregon) ...
In 1981 the Waucoma Hotel was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Event, Architecture/Engineering, #81000484). It is located on 2nd Street, Hood River, Oregon.

"... The three and four story brick building at the SE corner of Second Street and Cascade Avenue in Hood River was opened for use as the Waucoma Hotel by P.F. Fouts in 1904. Originally a three-story rectangular volume, it was enlarged by a four-story "L" shaped addition and reopened in 1910 as the Hotel Oregon by subsequent owners Hall and Smith. The following year, the original two-story, wood, wrap-around veranda which mimiced that of the Mount Hood Hotel of 1882, was removed for sidewalk construction and never replaced. The hotel was operated continuously under a succession of ownerships until its closure in 1973. ..."

Source:    Waucoma Hotel's National Register of Historical Places Nomination Form, 1981, #81000484


The Waukoma Hotel, located in Hood River, Oregon, contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to be an "official station" for Columbia River Highway travelers.

"... Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete. ..." [Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013]

Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Waucoma Hotel (also known as Hotel Oregon), Hood River, Oregon. View looking north down 2nd Street. Taken from front window of moving car. Image taken March 18, 2013.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Waucoma Hotel (also known oas Hotel Oregon), Hood River, Oregon. View from front window of moving car. Image taken April 9, 2015.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Waucoma Hotel (also known oas Hotel Oregon), Hood River, Oregon. View from front window of moving car. Image taken April 9, 2015.


Street Scenes ...

Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, Franz Hardware, Hood River, Oregon. View from front window of moving car. Image taken March 18, 2013.
Image, 2015, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Street scene, 2nd Street looking south, Hood River, Oregon. The historic Waucoma Hotel is brick building on the corner. View from front window of moving car. Image taken April 9, 2015.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcards have become a snapshot of history.

Penny Postcard, Depot, Hood River, Oregon, ca.1900s
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Penny Postcard: Original two Depots at Hood River, Oregon, (Mount Hood Railroad Depot, front and the O.W.R. & N. Depot, behind) plus the Mount Hood Hotel (background left), ca.1906-1910.
Penny Postcard, "View of Hood River R.R. Depot, O.R. and N. Depot and Mt. Hood Hotel, Hood River, Oregon". Made in Germany, Sprouse & Son, Importers and Publishers, Tacoma, Washington, Card #129143. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Hood River and Mount Hood, ca.1907
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Penny Postcard: Bird's eye view, Hood River, Oregon, and Mount Hood, ca.1907.
Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1907, "Birds eye View of Hood River, Oregon.". Published by The Portland Post Card Co., Portland, Oregon. Made in Germany. Card is postmarked August 22, 1907. Card #106. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Hood River Bridge, ca.1930
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Penny Postcard: Hood River Bridge as seen from the Oregon side, ca.1930.
Penny Postcard, ca.1930, "New Bridge over Columbia River, near Hood River, Ore., Erected in 1926.". Published by The Oregon News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #163. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Hood River Bridge, ca.1930
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Penny Postcard: Aerial view, Mount Hood, Columbia River, and the Hood River Bridge, ca.1930.
Penny Postcard, ca.1930. "Mt. Hood and Interstate Bridge to Columbia River Highway from Evergreen Highway.". Caption along the bottom reads: "White Salmon, Wash. to Hood River, Oregon.". View shows the Hood River Bridge before the lift-span was added. Card #826. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

The Hood River Bridge was built in 1924 and connects White Salmon and Bingen, Washington, with Hood River, Oregon. A lift span was added to the bridge in 1938 to respond to raised water elevations in the pool behind Bonneville Dam. The bridge is a steel structure with a narrow roadway deck width of approximately 18 feet 9 inches.



From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 29, 1805, first draft ...
a Cloudy morning wind Still from th West not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point] proceeded on about 5 miles and Came too at a Lodge of a Chief which we made at the upper village at th falls about his house there is Six others ...    

N. 55 W. 4 miles
to a Lard. point, pasd a run on Lard Side West 8 miles to Rock Island near the middle of River passed 7 Houses of Indians about 50 men at 1 mile on the Stard Side. Brakfast Those people fish at the last narrows, & have but little pounded fish, Som dried and buries

Those people are friendly gave us to eate fish Beries, nuts bread of roots & Drid beries and we Call this the friendly Village [Dougs Beach] ...    

at 4 miles further we landed to Smoke a pipe with the people of a village of 11 houses [Lyle, Washington area] we found those people also friendly Their Village is Situated imediately below the mouth of a River [Klickitat River] of 60 yards water which falls in on the Stard. Side and heads in the mountains to the N. & N, E, the Indians inform us that this river is long <but> and full of falls no Salmon pass up it. They also inform that 10 nations lives on this river by hunting and on buries &c. The Countrey begin to be thinly timbered with Pine & low white oake verry rocky and hilley- We purchased at this vilg 4 dogs- at the end of this Course is 3 rocks, in the river and a rock point from the Lard. the middle rock is large and has a number of graves on it we call it the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island].     The last River we call Caterack River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians inform is on it The Indians are afraid to hunt or be on th Lard Side of this Columbia river for fear of the Snake Ind. who reside on a fork of this river which falls in above the falls a good Situaion for winter quarters if game can be had is just below Sepulchar rock [Memaloose Island] on the Lard Side, high & pine and oake timber the rocks ruged above, good hunting Countrey back, as it appears from the river Indian village opsd. of 2 Lodgs     river 1/2 mile wide at rocks

S. 60 W. 5 miles
to a point of rocks Island in a Lard bend, passed 2 rocks in the river-     passed 2 Houses at 1 mile on the Stard Side and 2 at 4 miles on the Stard. Side     Countrey on the Lard. Side has more timber than common and looks well for huntg.     high and ruged.-

S. 80 W. 6 miles
to 4 Houses in a point of a timbered bottom on the Lard. Side at a large creek or River 40 yr. [Hood River]     passed a bottom on the Stard Side the distance in which there is 14 Indian houses-     The falls mountain covered with Snow is South [Mount Hood]

S. 70 W. 6 miles
to a high Clift of rocks Std bend [Bingen area] passed a large creek at 1 mile on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River] in which the Indians catch fish, a large Sand bar from the Lard. Side for 4 miles [below Hood River], at which place a small stream of water falls over a rock of 100 feet on the Lard Side [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, the location of today's Columbia Gorge Hotel]     passed 4 Indian Houses at 5 miles in a bottom on the Lard Side ...

S. 56 W. 6 miles
to a point of timbr. bottom on the Lard. Side, passd. a Stard. point at 2 miles Here the mountains are high on each Side, the high points of those to the Lard. has Snow

Came too at 3 miles on this Course at 3 Houses of flatheads and Encamped on the Stard. Side [near Drano Lake and the Little White Salmon River], a Pond lies back of those people in which we Saw great numbers of the Small Swan ...



Clark, October 29, 1805 ...
A cloudy morning wind from the West but not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point], and proceeded on about five miles Came too on the Stard. Side at a village of 7 houses built in the Same form and materials of those above, here we found the Chief we had Seen at the long narrows [The Dalles] ...     they are hospitable and good humered Speak the Same language of the inhabitants of the last village, we call this the friendly village [vicinity of Dougs Beach]. ...     after brackfast we proceeded on, the mountains are high on each Side [high basalt cliffs of the Rowena Gap, with Rowena Crest on the south and the Chamberlain Lake area on the north], containing Scattering pine white oake & under groth, hill Sides Steep and rockey; at 4 miles lower we observed a Small river falling in with great rapidity on the Stard. Side [Klickitat River] below which is a village of 11 houses [today the town of Lyle is on the upstream side of the Klickitat], here we landed to Smoke a pipe with the nativs and examine the mouth of the river, which I found to be 60 yards wide rapid and deep, The inhabitants of the village are friendly and Chearfull; those people inform us also those at the last village that this little river is long and full of falls, no Salmon pass up it, it runs from N. N. E. that ten nations live on this river and its waters, on buries, and what game that Can kill with their Bow & arrows

we purchased 4 dogs and Set out- (this village is the of the Same nation of the one we last passed) and proceeded on The Countrey on each side begin to be thicker timbered with Pine and low white Oake; verry rockey and broken [passing Mayer State Park on the Oregon side]. passed three large rocks in The river the middle rock is large long and has Several Squar vaults on it. we call this rockey Island the Sepulchar [Memaloose Island] - The last river we passed we Shall Call the Cataract River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians say is on it- passed 2 Lodges of Indians a Short distance below the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island] on the Stard. Side river wide, at 4 mile passed 2 houses on the Stard. Side, Six miles lower passed 4 houses above the mouth of a Small river 40 yards wide on the Lard. Side [Hood River]    a thick timbered bottom above & back of those houses; those are the first houses which we have Seen on the South Side of the Columbia River, (and the axess to those dificuelt) for fear of the approach of their common enemies the Snake Indians, passed 14 houses on the Std. Side Scattered on the bank- from the mouth of this little river which we shall Call Labeasche River [Hood River], the falls mountain [Mount Hood] is South and the top is covered with Snow.    one mile below pass the mouth of a large rapid Stream on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River], opposit to a large Sand bar [from Hood River], in this creek the Indians above take their fish, here we Saw Several canoes, which induced us to call this Canoe Creek [White Salmon River] it is 28 yards wide, about 4 miles lower and below the Sand bar [Hood River sandbar] is a butifull cascade falling over a rock of about 100 feet [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, location of the Columbia Gorge Hotel],

[On the route map (Moulton, vol.1, map#78) a "C___ Spring" is shown on the north side of the river, today the location of Spring Creek and Spring Creek Fish Hatchery, with no mention of it in any text. On the south side, at the location of Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, only "Cascade" is labeled and "4 Houses of Indians".]

a Short distance lower passed 4 Indian houses on the Lard. Side in a timbered bottom, a fiew miles further we came too at 3 houses on Stard. Side, back of which is a pond [today the location of Drano Lake. The Little White Salmon River empties into Drano Lake.] in which I Saw Great numbers of Small Swan, Capt. Lewis and went into the houses of those people ...     Here the mountains are high on each Side, those to the Lard. Side has Some Snow on them at this time, more timber than above and of greater variety.






Clark, April 14, 1806 ...
This morning at 7 oClock we were joined by Sgt. Pryor and they three hunters they brought with them 4 deer which drewyer had killed yesterday. we took brackfast and departed at 9 A. M. [from their camp near Dog Mountain]     the wind rose and <proceeded on> Continued to blow hard all day but not so violent as to prevent our proceeding. we kept Close allong the N. Shore all day. the river from the rapids [Cascade Rapids] to the Commencement of the narrows [The Dalles] is from to of a Mile in wedth, and possesses but little Current. the bead is rock except at the enterence of Labiech's river [Hood River] which heads in Mt. Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon] and like the quick Sand River [Sandy River] brings down from thence Vast bodies of Sand     the Mountains through which the river passes nearly to Cataract River [Klickitat River] are high broken rocky, particularly Covered with fir and white Cedar, and in maney places very romantic scences. Some handsom Cascades are Seen on either Side tumbling from the Stupendious rocks of the mountains into the river. I observe near the river the long leafed Pine which increas as we assend and Superseeds the fir altogether about the Sepulchre rock [Memaloose Island]. We find the trunks of maney large pine trees Standing erect as they grew, at present in 30 feet water [Submerged Forest]; they are much doated and none of them vegitateing. at the lowest water of the river maney of those trees are in 10 feet water. the Cause I have attempted to account for as I decended.     at 1 P M. we arrived at a large village Situated in a narrow <village> bottom on the N. Side [between the White Salmon River and Bingen, Washington] a little above the enterance of Canoe Creek [White Salmon River]. their houses are reather detached, and extend for Several Miles. they are about 20 in number. those people Call themselves Wil-la-cum. ...     We halted at this village Dined ...     after dinner we proceeded on our voyage. I walked on Shore with Shabono on the N. Side through a handsom bottom [Bingen area].     met Several parties of women and boys in Serch of herbs & roots to Subsist on maney of them had parcels of the Stems of the Sun flower. I joined Capt Lewis and the party at 6 miles, at which place the river washed the bottom of high Clifts on the N. Side [Bingen Gap]. Several Canoes over take us with families moveing up. we passed 3 encampments and came too in the mouth of a Small Creek [Major Creek] on the N. Side imediately below a village and opposit the Sepulchar rock [Memaloose Island]. this village Consists of about 100 fighting men of Several tibres from the plains to the North Collected here waiting for the Salmon. ...     made [blank] miles





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    "alaskarails.org" website, 2013;    Allen, J.E., and Burns, M., 1986, Cataclysms on the Columbia, Timber Press, Portland;    Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority website, 2004;    Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad website ("drgw.net"), 2013;    Early Canadiana Online website, 2006, "William Henry Gray's A history of Oregon, 1792-1849, drawn from personal observation and authentic information, published in 1870.";    "HistoricHoodRiver.com" website, 2016;    McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland;    National Register of Historic Places website, 2005;    National Register of Historic Places Registration Form, Union Pacific Railway Depot, Hood River, Oregon, #88001159;    Nichols Bros. Boat Builders website, 2016;    Norman, D.K, Busacca, A.J., and Teissere, R., 2004, Geology of the Yakima Valley Wine Country -- A Geologic Field Trip Guide from Stevenson to Zillah, Washington, Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources Field Trip Guide 1, June 2004;    Oregon State Archives website, 2004;    "rootsweb.org" website, 2013;    "ShipbuildingHistory.com" website, 2016;    Southwest Washington Regional Transportation Council website, 2004;

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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February 2016