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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Hood River, Oregon ... The History Museum"
Includes ... City of Hood River ... Hood River ... Hood River
Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


The History Museum ...
Hood River's History Museum lies on the north side of Interstate 84 and is nestled between the river on the west and the Hood River marina on the east. The paddle wheel of the steamboat "Henderson" is prominently displayed outside the Museum.

About the Museum ...
"The History Museum's grandfather organization is the Hood River County Historical Society and The Pioneer Society which began collecting artifacts in 1907. The current museum building was opened to the public in 1978 and was built from generous community support and donations."

Source:    Hood River's History Museum website, 2014.

Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Some of the Exhibits

  • "Henderson" Paddle Wheel ...
  • Hood River Apples and Pears ...
  • Koberg Beach ...
  • Parkdale ...
  • Stanley Smith Lumber Company Flume ...
  • Steam Engine ...


"Henderson" Paddle Wheel ...
The sternwheeler the "Henderson" began her career on the Columbia River in 1901 and continued until she beached in 1956. One highlight of her career occurred in 1952 when she played the riverboat "River Queen" in the Jimmy Stewart movie "Bend Of The River". In advertising for this movie the "Henderson" participated in the last sternwheeler race on the Columbia. The "Henderson" raced the Port of Portland's new steel-hulled sternwheeler the "Portland". During the race the "Henderson" came from behind to beat the "Portland" in the 3.6-mile race, blowing a gasket in the process.

THE HENDERSON - GONE but NOT forgotten

"The 160-foot sternwheeler M.F. Henderson was built by the Shaver Transportation Co. in 1901 as a combination freighter and tow-boat. In 1911, during an overhaul, she lost the initials "M.F." and became the Henderson. The Henderson enjoyed a long and distinguished career on the Columbia towing log rafts, pushing barges, and tugging ships. By 1950, the Henderson was one of only two wood-hulled sternwheelers still working on the river.

In December 1956, with a grain ship in tow, the Henderson encountered heavy swells near the mouth of the Columbia. The vedssel's hull pounded so hard against the unyielding tow that the crew was forced to beach her near Columbia City. Declared a "constructive total loss," the Henderson languished on the shore until she was burned to salvage scrap metal in 1964."




THE HENDERSON PADDLE WHEEL

"The "M.F. Henderson" was launched in 1901. Being a work-class steamer, she towed log rafts, grain barges and pushed ships. During an overhaul in 1912 she lost her initials and became known as the "Henderson".

During World War II she moved powerless ships through Portland's harbor bridges. In 1952 she starred in the movie "Bend of the River" under the name of "River Queen".

"The Henderson" had a long life for a wood steamer. Her end came in 1956 near Astoria. Heavy winds and surging waves smashed her against the steel side of her tow. Damaged beyond repair, she was eached near Columbia City.

John Hounsell, Hood River orchardist and boat builder, obtained permission to remove the wheel, which he renovated at this site in 1977."




Source:    Information signs, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon, 2014.

Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Paddle Wheel from the "Henderson", Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Paddle Wheel from the "Henderson", Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Paddle Wheel from the "Henderson", Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Paddle Wheel from the "Henderson", Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, Paddle Wheel from the "Henderson", Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Hood River Apples and Pears ...
(to come)

Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Hood River Fruit Growers, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Hood River Apples, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Hood River Apples, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Hood River Pears, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Hood River Pears, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Koberg Beach ...
Koberg Beach State Recreation Site (often seen as "Koberg Beach State Park") is located at Stanley Rock. Today a quiet windsurfer's beach, at one time it was a bustling recreation area for the residents of Hood River, Oregon.
[More]

Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Painting, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Photograph, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Exhibit, Hood River Museum, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Poster, Koberg Beach, Hood River Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Parkdale ...
Parkdale ...
Foothills of the Mountain


An energetic young Iowan and an ambitious lumberman saw the potential in a beautiful spot in the upper Hood River Valley and platted the town site now known as Parkdale. As early as 1902, settlers came from the East to stake claims and put down roots. Many were involved in logging and orcharding, utilizing the great natural resources to make a living.

The community won its name by popular vote, which was required in order to establish a Post Office. Parkdale sits at the southern end of the Hood River Valley at the foothills of the majestic Mount Hood.


Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Parkdale, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Parkdale, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Stanley Smith Lumber Company Log Flume ...
The Stanley Smith Lumber Company's log flume was 4-feet wide and 2-feet deep and was a system of trip gates, holding ponds, and sluice flumes which stretched for six miles. It was used to float logs to the mill for processing and then on for transportation. Water in the flume flowed at approximately 9 miles per hour.

"The Stanley-Smith Lumber company purchased the holdings of the Davenport Lumber company, August 19th, 1905, Mr. Frank Davenport retaining his interest in the business. The new firm has erected one of the best mills in the state. ...

The mill is of the double type, one side being a circular sawmill, the other a single cut band saw with shotgun feed. The company have enough fine fir and pine timber in their section to last them a long term of years. They have five donkey engines constantly bringing logs to the flume, a piece of engineering evolved by Mr. Davenport which enables a boy to move 40 or 50 big logs at a time from where they are dumped into the flume to where they are let into the big fifteen-acre mill pond at the mill. ...

The Stanley-Smith Lumber company has a retail yard located at Belmont, eight miles from the mill and about three miles from the city, and the wholesale yards are located on the track of the O.R. & N., a mile farther down the valley at Ruthton, through which yard the output of the mill, some 150,000 feet per day, besides large numbers of cedar fence post are handled. The water which floats the big logs into the mill empties into the mill pond and flows on through to the flume from the mill to the above mentioned lumber yards carrying the lumber to those distributing points ..."


Source:    "The Hood River News-Letter", September 29, 1906, p.15, obtained from "rootsweb.com" website, 2014.


Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, Stanley Smith Lumber Company log flume, ca.1916, Greenpoint Mill, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


Steam Engine ...
STEAM ENGINE

This engine was used to power one of the early river boats used on the Columbia River east of the Cascade Mts. in the 1850s.

During the Indian uprising of 1856 it is believed that it powered the river boat "Mary" when she brought settlers from Cascade Locks.

This engine was later used as a source of pwer for the first flour mill at The Dalles Ore. After this it was purchased by the Oregon Lumber Co. and was used in their sawmill in the La Grande area.

In 1959 Anton Lausman the last owner presented it to the Hood River County Museum who reconditioned it and placed it here for display.


Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, 1850s steam engine, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.
Image, 2014, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Exhibit, 1850s steam engine, The History Museum, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken July 26, 2014.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 29, 1805, first draft ...
a Cloudy morning wind Still from th West not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point] proceeded on about 5 miles and Came too at a Lodge of a Chief which we made at the upper village at th falls about his house there is Six others ...    

N. 55 W. 4 miles
to a Lard. point, pasd a run on Lard Side West 8 miles to Rock Island near the middle of River passed 7 Houses of Indians about 50 men at 1 mile on the Stard Side. Brakfast Those people fish at the last narrows, & have but little pounded fish, Som dried and buries

Those people are friendly gave us to eate fish Beries, nuts bread of roots & Drid beries and we Call this the friendly Village [Dougs Beach] ...    

at 4 miles further we landed to Smoke a pipe with the people of a village of 11 houses [Lyle, Washington area] we found those people also friendly Their Village is Situated imediately below the mouth of a River [Klickitat River] of 60 yards water which falls in on the Stard. Side and heads in the mountains to the N. & N, E, the Indians inform us that this river is long <but> and full of falls no Salmon pass up it. They also inform that 10 nations lives on this river by hunting and on buries &c. The Countrey begin to be thinly timbered with Pine & low white oake verry rocky and hilley- We purchased at this vilg 4 dogs- at the end of this Course is 3 rocks, in the river and a rock point from the Lard. the middle rock is large and has a number of graves on it we call it the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island].     The last River we call Caterack River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians inform is on it The Indians are afraid to hunt or be on th Lard Side of this Columbia river for fear of the Snake Ind. who reside on a fork of this river which falls in above the falls a good Situaion for winter quarters if game can be had is just below Sepulchar rock [Memaloose Island] on the Lard Side, high & pine and oake timber the rocks ruged above, good hunting Countrey back, as it appears from the river Indian village opsd. of 2 Lodgs     river 1/2 mile wide at rocks

S. 60 W. 5 miles
to a point of rocks Island in a Lard bend, passed 2 rocks in the river-     passed 2 Houses at 1 mile on the Stard Side and 2 at 4 miles on the Stard. Side     Countrey on the Lard. Side has more timber than common and looks well for huntg.     high and ruged.-

S. 80 W. 6 miles
to 4 Houses in a point of a timbered bottom on the Lard. Side at a large creek or River 40 yr. [Hood River]     passed a bottom on the Stard Side the distance in which there is 14 Indian houses-     The falls mountain covered with Snow is South [Mount Hood]

S. 70 W. 6 miles
to a high Clift of rocks Std bend [Bingen area] passed a large creek at 1 mile on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River] in which the Indians catch fish, a large Sand bar from the Lard. Side for 4 miles [below Hood River], at which place a small stream of water falls over a rock of 100 feet on the Lard Side [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, the location of today's Columbia Gorge Hotel]     passed 4 Indian Houses at 5 miles in a bottom on the Lard Side ...

S. 56 W. 6 miles
to a point of timbr. bottom on the Lard. Side, passd. a Stard. point at 2 miles Here the mountains are high on each Side, the high points of those to the Lard. has Snow

Came too at 3 miles on this Course at 3 Houses of flatheads and Encamped on the Stard. Side [near Drano Lake and the Little White Salmon River], a Pond lies back of those people in which we Saw great numbers of the Small Swan ...



Clark, October 29, 1805 ...
A cloudy morning wind from the West but not hard, we Set out at day light [from their camp on Rocky Island at Crates Point], and proceeded on about five miles Came too on the Stard. Side at a village of 7 houses built in the Same form and materials of those above, here we found the Chief we had Seen at the long narrows [The Dalles] ...     they are hospitable and good humered Speak the Same language of the inhabitants of the last village, we call this the friendly village [vicinity of Dougs Beach]. ...     after brackfast we proceeded on, the mountains are high on each Side [high basalt cliffs of the Rowena Gap, with Rowena Crest on the south and the Chamberlain Lake area on the north], containing Scattering pine white oake & under groth, hill Sides Steep and rockey; at 4 miles lower we observed a Small river falling in with great rapidity on the Stard. Side [Klickitat River] below which is a village of 11 houses [today the town of Lyle is on the upstream side of the Klickitat], here we landed to Smoke a pipe with the nativs and examine the mouth of the river, which I found to be 60 yards wide rapid and deep, The inhabitants of the village are friendly and Chearfull; those people inform us also those at the last village that this little river is long and full of falls, no Salmon pass up it, it runs from N. N. E. that ten nations live on this river and its waters, on buries, and what game that Can kill with their Bow & arrows

we purchased 4 dogs and Set out- (this village is the of the Same nation of the one we last passed) and proceeded on The Countrey on each side begin to be thicker timbered with Pine and low white Oake; verry rockey and broken [passing Mayer State Park on the Oregon side]. passed three large rocks in The river the middle rock is large long and has Several Squar vaults on it. we call this rockey Island the Sepulchar [Memaloose Island] - The last river we passed we Shall Call the Cataract River [Klickitat River] from the number of falls which the Indians say is on it- passed 2 Lodges of Indians a Short distance below the Sepulchar Island [Memaloose Island] on the Stard. Side river wide, at 4 mile passed 2 houses on the Stard. Side, Six miles lower passed 4 houses above the mouth of a Small river 40 yards wide on the Lard. Side [Hood River]    a thick timbered bottom above & back of those houses; those are the first houses which we have Seen on the South Side of the Columbia River, (and the axess to those dificuelt) for fear of the approach of their common enemies the Snake Indians, passed 14 houses on the Std. Side Scattered on the bank- from the mouth of this little river which we shall Call Labeasche River [Hood River], the falls mountain [Mount Hood] is South and the top is covered with Snow.    one mile below pass the mouth of a large rapid Stream on the Stard. Side [White Salmon River], opposit to a large Sand bar [from Hood River], in this creek the Indians above take their fish, here we Saw Several canoes, which induced us to call this Canoe Creek [White Salmon River] it is 28 yards wide, about 4 miles lower and below the Sand bar [Hood River sandbar] is a butifull cascade falling over a rock of about 100 feet [Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, location of the Columbia Gorge Hotel],

[On the route map (Moulton, vol.1, map#78) a "C___ Spring" is shown on the north side of the river, today the location of Spring Creek and Spring Creek Fish Hatchery, with no mention of it in any text. On the south side, at the location of Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, only "Cascade" is labeled and "4 Houses of Indians".]

a Short distance lower passed 4 Indian houses on the Lard. Side in a timbered bottom, a fiew miles further we came too at 3 houses on Stard. Side, back of which is a pond [today the location of Drano Lake. The Little White Salmon River empties into Drano Lake.] in which I Saw Great numbers of Small Swan, Capt. Lewis and went into the houses of those people ...     Here the mountains are high on each Side, those to the Lard. Side has Some Snow on them at this time, more timber than above and of greater variety.






Clark, April 14, 1806 ...
This morning at 7 oClock we were joined by Sgt. Pryor and they three hunters they brought with them 4 deer which drewyer had killed yesterday. we took brackfast and departed at 9 A. M. [from their camp near Dog Mountain]     the wind rose and <proceeded on> Continued to blow hard all day but not so violent as to prevent our proceeding. we kept Close allong the N. Shore all day. the river from the rapids [Cascade Rapids] to the Commencement of the narrows [The Dalles] is from to of a Mile in wedth, and possesses but little Current. the bead is rock except at the enterence of Labiech's river [Hood River] which heads in Mt. Hood [Mount Hood, Oregon] and like the quick Sand River [Sandy River] brings down from thence Vast bodies of Sand     the Mountains through which the river passes nearly to Cataract River [Klickitat River] are high broken rocky, particularly Covered with fir and white Cedar, and in maney places very romantic scences. Some handsom Cascades are Seen on either Side tumbling from the Stupendious rocks of the mountains into the river. I observe near the river the long leafed Pine which increas as we assend and Superseeds the fir altogether about the Sepulchre rock [Memaloose Island]. We find the trunks of maney large pine trees Standing erect as they grew, at present in 30 feet water [Submerged Forest]; they are much doated and none of them vegitateing. at the lowest water of the river maney of those trees are in 10 feet water. the Cause I have attempted to account for as I decended.     at 1 P M. we arrived at a large village Situated in a narrow <village> bottom on the N. Side [between the White Salmon River and Bingen, Washington] a little above the enterance of Canoe Creek [White Salmon River]. their houses are reather detached, and extend for Several Miles. they are about 20 in number. those people Call themselves Wil-la-cum. ...     We halted at this village Dined ...     after dinner we proceeded on our voyage. I walked on Shore with Shabono on the N. Side through a handsom bottom [Bingen area].     met Several parties of women and boys in Serch of herbs & roots to Subsist on maney of them had parcels of the Stems of the Sun flower. I joined Capt Lewis and the party at 6 miles, at which place the river washed the bottom of high Clifts on the N. Side [Bingen Gap]. Several Canoes over take us with families moveing up. we passed 3 encampments and came too in the mouth of a Small Creek [Major Creek] on the N. Side imediately below a village and opposit the Sepulchar rock [Memaloose Island]. this village Consists of about 100 fighting men of Several tibres from the plains to the North Collected here waiting for the Salmon. ...     made [blank] miles





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    See Hood River;   plus:   "HistoricHoodRiver.com" website, 2014;    Hood River County, Oregon website, 2014;    Oregonlive.com website, 2014, "An Oregon Century";    "rootsweb.com" website, 2014;

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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August 2014