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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon"
Includes ... Historic Columbia River Highway ... Crown Point Highway ... National Recreation Trail ... Roadhouses ... Benson Bridge ... Bishops Cap ... Bridal Veil Falls and Overlook ... Chanticleer Point ... Crown Point ... Eagle Creek ... Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ... Horsetail Falls ... Latourelle Falls ... Maryhill Loops ... Mosier Twin Tunnels ... Multnomah Falls ... Oneonta Gorge ... Portland Woman's Forum Scenic View ... Rowena Crest ... Rowena Dell ... Rowena Loops ... Sandy River ... Shepperds Dell ... Vista House ... Wahkeena Falls ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2004, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Crown Point. Image taken October 11, 2004.


Historic Columbia River Highway ...
The "Historic Columbia River Highway" (HCRH) was once part of the "Columbia River Highway" system (Oregon Highway 30 and Interstate 84), which extended from Astoria to the Idaho border. The HCRH was the original road which traversed the Columbia River Gorge on the Oregon side, from Troutdale - 14 miles east of Portland, to The Dalles - 88 miles east of Portland. The Highway was the first scenic highway constructed in the United States. The design and development were the products of Samuel Hill, lawyer and entrepreneur, and Samuel C. Lancaster, an engineer and landscape architect. Built between 1913 and 1922, the Highway was patterned after the Auxenstrasse in Swizerland. Throughout the 74-mile route, the road grades are no greater than 5 percent, and no curves have less than a 100-foot turning radius. Today the Highway is owned by the Oregon Department of Transportation and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. In 1984, the American Society of Civil Engineers declared the road a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark, and in 1998 the the road was designated an All-American Road.

Before the Columbia River Highway ...
"... The first wagon road in the Gorge ran from the town of Bonneville to the site of the future Cascade Locks -- a distance of six miles -- and was completed in 1856. It climbed to an elevation of over 400 feet on steep grades around a portage at the Cascades of the Columbia River. This road only ran a short distance, however, and met the needs of a select few. Journeys on it, carrying supplies from Fort Vancouver to men stationed east of the Cascade Mountains, proved onerous. By 1872, the Oregon legislature designated $50,000 for building a wagon road from the mouth of the Sandy River, 18 miles east of Portland, through the Gorge to The Dalles. The road money was soon expended and four years later another $50,000 was appropriated. Even though the road was completed, travel on it proved difficult. The alignment was crooked and narrow with heavy grades, often exeeeding 20 percent. "The Dalles-to-Sandy Wagon Road" was never really practicable for travel.

Only in 1882 was the Gorge accessible with a continuous overland route when the Oregon Railway and Navigation Company (ORN) constructed a water-level track from Portland to The Dalles. ... For the next thirty years, the line provided the only real alternative to steamboats for travel along the river. ..."


Source:    USDI/NPS National Register for Historic Places Registration Form, Columbia River Highway, 2000


The beginning of the Columbia River Highway ...

Image, 2006, Bronze plaque, Starvation Creek State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bronze Plaque for the beginning of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Located at the Starvation Creek Rest Area. Image taken September 29, 2006.


The Highway in 1916 ...
The official opening of the Columbia River Highway from Portland to Hood River marked the completion of a tremendous feat in highway construction. On June 6, 1916, dedication of the highway took place at Crown Point.

Image, 2005, Crown Point from Portland Woman's Forum Scenic View, click to enlarge
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Crown Point and Vista House. View from Portland's Woman Forum Scenic View (formerly Chanticleer Point). Image taken October 22, 2005.


The Highway in 1919 ...
"... Traveling eastward from Portland, the motorist passes thru Troutdale, across the Sandy river, catches a glimpse of Rooster rock near the Chanticleer inn, and the Crown Point chalet, overlooking Vista house, at Crown Point, where a splendid view may be had up and down the Columbia, flowing 750 feet below. One may see for thirty miles in any direction. The scenic effect is wonderful, and here indeed is keenly felt the magnificence and splendor of this mighty stream. From this point the road spirals downward in a triple figure 8, descending 600 feet and never getting off a 40-acre tract of land. Next in order are Latourell bridge, to the right which are Latourell falls (193 ft.); Shepherd's dell; Coopey falls, which are far up on the cliff, and Bridal Veil falls. You now pass between Lone rock and Fort rock, where legendary giants battled in the days of long ago, and come upon Mist falls and then Wahkenna falls, located in Benson park. Next is Multnomah falls, the queen of American cataracts. This in reality consists of two falls, the upper (541 ft.) and lower (69 ft.). A splendid trail leads to the bridge here and around and under the falls. From here, on the Washington side, one may catch glimpses of St. Peters dome, Cathedral rock and other lofty eminences. At Warrendale, about four miles distant, a ferry may be taken to Beacon rock. For many years this rock, which covers at its base 17 acres and has a hieght of 900 feet. At Tanner the petrified forests may be seen. In crossing the McCord creek bridge, watch for the beautiful falls on the right, and for the Wahe falls when crossing the Moffet creek bridge. This latter bridge has a span stretching across 170 feet, with a 17-foot rise, and is 75 feet above the water. The noted bridge in Yellowstone park (by General Chittenden) has a span of only 150 feet. Along here on the mountain slopes may be noticed the old government trail, made fifty years ago. At Bonneville may be seen the largest fish hatcheries in the U.S. You now cross Eagle creek, which is in the heart of the Oregon national forest reserve (open free to picnickers and campers), catching frequent splendid views of the river and mountains along the highway to Hood river. ..."


Source:    The Automobile Blue Book, 1919, "Points of Interest, Columbia River Highway"


The Highway in 1922 ...
America's Great Outdoors

"... The greatest scenic roadway in America is the Columbia River Highway which is the key to the treasure box of beauties and of the impelling grandeur of the gorge of the Columbia River. Portland, Oregon, is world-famed for its climate, its roses, as a residential city, and for being the threshold of enjoyment in outdoor life at its best --- fishing, hunting, boating, mountain climbing, skiing, snowshoeing and general camping. Oregon's star attraction, however, is an auto tour of a few hours over fifty miles of hardsurfaced road east to Hood River --- the home of the famous Spitzbergen Apple. The cost is very low. The highway follows the shoreline of the mighty Columbia River and along the base of tremendous cliffs over which fall the milky waters of many streams from the glaciers of Mt. Hood. Scenically this trip is without a peer in America and bears a marked resemblance to the Alps, the Rhine, and Italy with the added charm of the wild grandeur of the American Rockies. Another feature alone would make this highway famous for it is the most remarkable road-engineering feat extant. Into this land of Thanatopsis is a fifty-mile perfectly paved road, with quaint retaining walls of dry masonry, winding up over cliffs and down into meadowy valleys and crossing a dozen tubulant, milky streams from the hinterland.

Fifteen bridges, each of a different design, are crossed in ten miles of travel. Among the eleven spell-binding waterfalls are Latourell, whose waters drop 124 feet to its pool and Latourell Bridge with three 80-foot arches; Sheppard's Dell covered with white concrete arches over a chasm 140 feet high and 150 feet deep; Waukeena which is a spectacular fall of 400 feet over a tortuous course; and the climax is Multnomah with its 700-foot fall silently dropping into a picturesque moss-encircled basin, and then follows another cascade 70 feet farther on its way to the Columbia. Multnomah is the second highest cascade in the United States.

At Crown Point, 700 feet above the river is Vista House dedicated to the early pioneers and from which the auto road doubles itself five times in a space of 40 acres, describing a triple figure of eight to maintain its 5 per cent grade. At Booneville is the largest fish hatchery in the world where eggs are developed up to five or six months, when they are planted in the river to return years later to add their quota to the hundred million dollars worth of Royal Chinook which have been the yield of this food to man. We pass the fabled Bridge of the Gods and the 380-foot tunnel at Mitchell's Point where five great windows open to a vista of the river. This is destined to be even more famous than the Axenstrasse of Switzerland. A return from Hood River by steamboat gives one a more general idea of this remarkable mountain and river topography and emphasizes that this scenery is unsurpassed in grandeur and charm and that man's handiwork has here excelled in his accommodations that Americans may see it all quickly and without discomfort. ..."

Source:    Claude P. Fordyce, 1922, "America's Great Outdoors", published in "The Rotarian", May 1922


The Highway today ...
All of the western 21.6 miles of the Historic Columbia River Highway, from Troutdale to Dodson, is original except at Oneonta Gorge Creek, where in 1948 it was slightly realigned to bypass Oneonta Tunnel and cross Oneonta Gorge Creek on a 1948 reinforced-concrete girder span. All of the engineering features associated with this portion of the highway, including the original Oneonta Gorge Creek Bridge, the Oneonta Tunnel, and Interstate 84's Toothrock Tunnel, are intact. Portions of the Highway between Dodson and Hood River were sacrificed in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s for construction of the water-level route that became Interstate 84. Those discontinuous segments that remain between Dodson and Hood River, however, possess much of their original construction, including masonry walls, bridges, viaducts, and pavement. The Oregon Department of Transportation is restoring several of these segments for non-motorized use, creating the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
In 2002 the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail was designated a National Recreation Trail.
[More]

Views of the Highway ...

Image, 2004, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway. View from Vista House, Crown Point. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 22, 2009.
Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway, at Multnomah Falls. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken June 29, 2005.
Image, 2011, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Stone house, Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window moving car. Image taken July 1, 2011.
Image, 2005, Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2005, Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2005, Near Rowena Crest, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Near Rowena Crest, Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2005, Near Rowena Crest, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Near Rowena Crest, Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Places along the Highway ... (alphabetical)

  • Angels Rest ("Fort Rock") ...
  • Bishops Cap ...
  • Bridal Veil Falls and Overlook ...
  • Coopey Falls ...
  • Crown Point and Vista House ...
  • Eagle Creek ...
  • Forest Hall ...
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
  • Horsetail Falls ...
  • Latourell Falls ...
  • Mayerdale Place ...
  • Mist Falls ...
  • Mosier Twin Tunnels ...
  • Multnomah Falls, Benson Bridge, and the Lodge ...
  • Oneonta Gorge ...
  • Portland Woman's Forum State Scenic Viewpoint (Chanticleer Point) ...
  • Roadhouses ...
  • Rowena Crest ...
  • Rowena Dell ...
  • Rowena Loops ...
  • Ruckel Creek ...
  • Sandy River ...
  • Shepperd's Dell ...
  • Wahkeena Falls ...

Angels Rest ...
Angels Rest, once called "Fort Rock", is a lava flow of Columbia River Basalt which lies between Coopey Creek and Falls on its west side and Wahkeena Creek and Falls on its east.
[More]

Image, 2004, Angels Rest and Devils Rest, Oregon, from Tunnel Point, click to enlarge
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Angels Rest (ridge left) and Devils Rest (cone on top), as seen from Tunnel Point, Oregon. Angels Rest is Columbia River basalt and lies uphill from Dalton Point, Oregon. Devils Rest is a Boring Lava cone. Image taken October 10, 2004.


Bishops Cap ...
Bishops Cap is a once-spectacular basalt feature (it is now mostly obscured by trees) on the upstream side of the Shepperds Dell Bridge.
[More]

Penny Postcard, Bishops Cap, Shepperds Dell Highway, ca.1920 Bishops Cap, Shepperd's Dell Highway, ca.1920 Penny Postcard, ca.1920, Bishops Cap and Shepperd's Dell Highway. Caption along the top reads "Scene at Shepperd's Dell, Columbia River Highway, Ore.". Sand Island and the Columbia River are in the background. Published by The Oregon News Co., Portland, Oregon In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2013, Bishops Cap from Shepperd's Dell, click to enlarge
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Bishops Cap from Shepperd's Dell, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Bridal Veil Falls and Overlook ...
Bridal Veil Falls is one of the many falls in Oregon which can be seen along the Historic Columbia River Highway, just east of Portland, Oregon, and bordering the Columbia River. Unfortunately at the time of this web authors visit (2004, 2005), the trail to the falls was closed for maintenance. A second trail which loops to the Columbia River was a nice 1/2 mile hike with spectacular views.
[More]

Image, 2009, Bridal Veil Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridal Veil Falls, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken April 26, 2009.
Image, 2004, Sand Island from Bridal Veil, click to enlarge
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Sand Island from Bridal Veil Overlook. Image taken October 11, 2004.


Coopey Falls ...
Coopey Falls is located along the Historic Columbia River Highway, one mile east of Bridal Veil. The 150-foot-high falls are located behind a convent located by the Franciscan Sisters of the Eucharist. To the east lies the massive basalt ridge of Angels Rest.
[More]

Image, 2013, Coopey Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Coopey Falls, Oregon, as seen from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Crown Point and Vista House ...
One favorite location to visit on the Historic Columbia River Highway is Crown Point and Vista House, built in 1916 as a rest stop along the highway. Crown Point and Vista House can only be reached via the Highway.
[More]

Image, 2004, Vista House and Crown Point, click to enlarge
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Vista House and Crown Point. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2005, Vista House and Crown Point, click to enlarge
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Vista House at Crown Point. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Eagle Creek ...
Eagle Creek is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 150, at the upstream end of the Bonneville Dam. Eagle Creek was the location of the first U.S. Forest Service Campground, established in 1916. Today Eagle Creek is one of the most popular hikes in the Columbia Gorge. Located on the right bank of Eagle Creek is the Eagle Creek Fish Hatchery. The bridge crossing Eagle Creek was once part of the Historic Columbia River Highway (HCRH), and is now part of the off-ramp from Interstate 84. The concrete-arch bridge is the only HCRH bridge faced with stone.
[More]

Image, 2006, Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
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Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Upstream side. Image taken September 16, 2006.
Image, 2006, Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
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Sitting area, Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Image taken September 16, 2006.


Forest Hall ...
Forest Hall, built in 1915, was one of the many roadhouses along the Columbia River Highway. Forest Hall is located 1/4 mile east of Shepherd's Dell. Today it is a private residence.
[More]

Images, 2013, Forest Hall, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Forest Hall, Columbia River Gorge, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
[More]

Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail at John B. Yeon State Park. View looking east. Image taken June 9, 2014.


Horsetail Falls ...
Horsetail Falls is a classic example of a horsetail formation. The 176-foot-tall lower falls is located on Horsetail Creek and can be viewed from a turnout on the Historic Columbia River Highway, 2 1/2 miles east of Multnomah Falls. The name "Horsetail Falls" has been used since Pioneer days.
[More]

Image, 2005, Horsetail Falls, click to enlarge
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Horsetail Falls. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Latourell Falls ...
Latourell Falls plunges 249 feet, and is located in Oregon's Guy W. Talbot State Park. The falls is on Latourell Creek and was named after Joseph Latourell, a prominent Columbia River Gorge settler.
[More]

Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Latourell Falls, Oregon, as seen from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken March 22, 2009.
Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge at Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 22, 2009.


Mayerdale Place ...
The Mayerdale Place, built in 1910, is located on the north side of the Historic Columbia River Highway between Mosier and Rowena Crest.
[More]

Image, 2010, Mayerdale Place, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mayerdale Place, view from the east, Mosier, Oregon. Note apple orchard in the background. Image taken March 6, 2010.
Image, 2010, Mayerdale Place, Mosier, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mayerdale Place, view from the southwest, Mosier, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2010.


Mist Falls ...
The 500-foot-high Mist Falls is the second tallest falls in the State of Oregon, with Multnomah Falls, located one mile upstream, being higher. Mist Falls is located above Benson State Recreation Area at Columbia River Mile (RM) 135. Mist Falls is a 20-feet-wide tiered falls with 2 drops, and is located on Mist Creek. The falls is one of many falls in the Columbia River Gorge which can be seen from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Good views can be had from Benson State Recreation Area, or from the Washington side of the Columbia near Prindle.
[More]

Image, 2009, Mist Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mist Falls, Oregon, as seen from Benson State Park. Image taken January 13, 2009.


Mosier Twin Tunnels ...
The "Twin Tunnels" of Mosier were a part of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Built in the early 1920s, the tunnels were closed and sealed after the construction of Interstate 84. In 2000, with the help of Senator Mark Hatfield, the tunnels were once again opened as part of the 4.6 mile Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, open to foot and bicycle traffic only.
[More]

Image, 2005, East Portal, Mosier Tunnels, click to enlarge
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East Portal, Mosier Tunnels. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2005, East Portal, Mosier Tunnels, click to enlarge
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East Portal, Mosier Twin Tunnels. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Multnomah Falls, Benson Bridge, and the Lodge ...
Multnomah Falls, at 620 feet, is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see Oregon's number one tourist place. Benson Bridge was built in 1914 across the falls, and the Multnomah Falls Lodge, at one time a stopover on the Historic Columbia River Highway (HCRH), was built in 1925. The HCRH crosses Multnomah Creek below the falls.
[More]

Image, 2005, Multnomah Falls, Benson Bridge, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls and Benson Bridge, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Imag5, 2004, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Images, 2005, Multnomah Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Creek, Oregon flowing beneath the Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2012, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Multnomah Falls. View shot from moving car. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Oneonta Gorge ...
[More]

Image, 2005, Oneonta Creek Bridge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridge over Oneonta Creek, Oregon. View is looking downstream. Image taken June 29, 2005.
Image, 2005, Oneonta Gorge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Oneonta Gorge, Oregon. View is looking upstream. Image taken June 29, 2005.
Image, 2005, Oneonta Gorge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Oneonta Gorge tunnel location, Historic Columbia River Highway. View looking across old bridge at what was once the west portal of the Oneonta Tunnel. Image taken October 22, 2005.


Portland Woman's Forum State Scenic Viewpoint (Chanticleer Point) ...
Once called "Chanticleer Point" and the home of a world-famous Inn, the location now is known as the Portland Woman's Forum Scenic Viewpoint.
[More]

Image, 2006, Chanticleer Point, click to enlarge
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Chanticleer Point, now the Portland Women's Forum Scenic Viewpoint. Image taken September 23, 2006.
Image, 2004, Crown Point from Portland Woman's Forum Scenic View, click to enlarge
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View from Chanticleer Point, now the Portland's Woman Forum Scenic Viewpoint. Image taken October 11, 2004.


Roadhouses along the Highway ...
In the early days of the Historic Columbia River Highway roadhouses along the route were the establishments to visit, attracting the rich and famous. Chanticleer Inn, now the location of the Portland Women's Forum Scenic Viewpoint, was only 22 miles from Portland. Crown Point Chalet overlooked Vista House, an of-its-day rest stop. Nearby was the View Point Inn, established in 1925. Latourell Chalet was established in 1914 and had a brief 3-month history, and Forrest Hall and Bridal Veil Lodge were located near Bridal Veil. The still-in-existance Multnomah Falls Lodge, once known as "Simmons-By-The-Falls", was located at the beautiful Multnomah Falls, with Mist Lodge being just west of there at the base of Mist Falls. Furthest along the route was the Columbia Gorge Hotel still quite popular today.
[More]

Image, 2006, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Images, 2005, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon. Image taken December 10, 2005.
Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
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View Point Inn, Oregon. View from Chanticleer Point (Portland Women's Forum). Image taken June 28, 2009.


Rowena Crest ...
Rowena Crest is on the Oregon side of the Columbia River and is part of the Rowena Gap basalt flows. The Historic Columbia River Highway passes over Rowena Crest, and contains an impressive loop in the eastern side.
[More]

Image, 2004, Rowena Crest, Oregon, from Mayer State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Rowena Crest, Oregon, from Mayer State Park, Oregon. Image taken November 11, 2004.
Image, 2005, Sign, Rowena Crest, click to enlarge
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Rowena Crest, on the Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Rowena Dell ...
Rowena Dell lies along the Historic Columbia River Highway just east of Rowena Crest.
[More]

Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, Rowena Dell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway and Rowena Dell, Oregon. View from bridge on the Historic Columbia River Highway looking downstream towards the Columbia River. Mount Adams, Washington, is on the skyline right. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Rowena Loops ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway passes over Rowena Crest and continues down the east side where it contains an impressive loop in the eastern side.
[More]

Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, from Rowena Crest, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from Rowena Crest. Image taken September 18, 2005.
Image, 2005, Rowena Loops, click to enlarge
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Rowena Loops, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from Rowena Crest. Image taken September 18, 2005.


Ruckel Creek ...
Ruckel Creek is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 147, upstream of Bonneville Dam. Downstream is Eagle Creek and Tanner Creek while upstream is the Oregon community of Cascade Locks.
[More]


Sandy River ...
At the turn of the century the Sandy River was the beginning of Oregon's Historic Columbia River Highway. The Highway began at the 6th Street Bridge, located around Sandy River Mile (RM) 5. As the highway improved the "Crown Point Highway" was routed across a bridge further north, closer to the Columbia's mouth, at RM 3.
[More]

Penny Postcard, Sandy River Bridge, click to enlarge
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Penny Postcard, Sandy River Bridge, ca.1915. Sandy River, Oregon, and the Stark Street Bridge, located at Sandy River Mile 6. Caption reads "Sandy River Bridge at Auto Club Grounds - Beginning of the Columbia River Highway, Oregon". The Columbia River Highway was built between 1913 and 1922, at the beginning of the automobile age. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2004, Sandy River Bridge looking downstream, click to enlarge
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Sandy River Bridge, Oregon, looking downstream. Bridge across the Sandy River, located at Sandy River Mile 3, today part of the "Crown Point Highway". Image taken June 27, 2004.


Shepperd's Dell ...
The Shepperd's Dell Bridge is a graceful reinforced concrete deck arch with a main arch span of 100 feet and consists of two parabolic arch ribs with open spandrels. The bridge was designed by K.R. Billner under the supervison of Samuel C. Lancaster. The structure was constructed by the Pacific Bridge Company, Portland, at a cost of $10,800. A stairwell and trail to the Shepperd's Dell Falls is at the east end of the bridge. Shepperd's Dell Bridge is located in Shepperd's Dell State Natural Area. The land was donated as parkland by the owner, George Shepperd, a local farmer in memory of his wife.
[More]

Penny Postcard, Shepperds Dell Highway, ca.1920 Shepperd's Dell Highway, Oregon. Penny Postcard, ca.1920, Shepperd's Dell Highway. Caption along the bottom reads "305. Shepperd's Dell, Columbia River Highway, Oregon". #305, Chas. S. Lipschuetz Co., Portland, Oregon In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2005, Shepperd's Dell Bridge, click to enlarge
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Shepperd's Dell Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Wahkeena Falls ...
Wahkeena Falls is located one-half mile west of the more-famous Multnomah Falls. A short trail links the two. Wahkeena Falls is 242 feet high and is a "tiered" falls. These falls were once known as "Gordon Falls" for F.E. Gordon, a pioneer landowner. Confusion arose between Gordon Creek near the Sandy River and Gorton Creek near Cascade Locks. In 1915 the Mazamas were appointed to name points on the Columbia River Highway and clear up confusion of similar names in the area. Wahkeena Falls and Wahkeena Creek were chosen. "Wahkeena" comes from the Yakama Tribe and means "most beautiful".
[More]

Image, 2005, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Wahkeena Falls. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2005, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Wahkeena Falls. Image taken March 6, 2005.


More about the Columbia River Highway ...


Maryhill Loops ...
Sam Hill's "Maryhill Loops" east of The Dalles, was first built as a forerunner to the Historic Columbia River Highway.
[More]

Image, 2004, Maryhill Loops, Washington, click to enlarge
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Maryhill Loops, Washington. Image taken April 24, 2004.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: Friends of Vista House website, 2004; McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press; Oregon Department of Transportation website, 2004; "PDXHistory.com" website, 2006; "Rotarian", May 1922; U.S. Forest Service website, 2004, "Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area"; U.S. National Park Service website, 2004.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
July 2013