Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Hewlett Point, Washington"
Includes ... Hewlett Point ... "Hewlett's Point" ... "Broughton Point" ...
Image, 2005, Looking towards Hewlett Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Frenchmans Bar Park looking towards old barn at Hewlett Point. Image taken July 3, 2005.


Hewlett Point ...
Hewlett Point is located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 100, at the upstream end of today's Frenchmans Bar Park and one mile downstream of Blurock Landing, and within the Vancouver Lake Lowlands. Across the Columbia on Sauvie Island is a spot known as "Morgan Landing".

Lewis and Clark and Hewlett Point ...
According to the 1973 Vancouver Lake Flood Contol, Environmental Impact Statement:

"The Wakanasi, or Wakanashishi, village site is located opposite Reeder Point by a small slough which formerly connected Shillapoo Lake with Columbia River. The village was occupied by Chief Keasno, whose group had villages on Multnomah Channel and Kalama River. This group was nearly exterminated in the epidemic of 1829 to 1834 and the survivors, including Keasno, moved to Wakanasi. A second village site noted by Lewis and Clark on Columbia River was at Hewlett Point, where they saw four wooden houses set in shallow depressions."

On November 4, 1805, Lewis and Clarked camped on the north side of the Columbia River, near the location of today's Post Office Lake, approximately five miles downstream of today's Hewlett Point. Their route map (Moulton, Vol.1, Map#79) shows "4 wood houses Skil-lute".


Who Was Hewlett ??? ...
Hewlett Point is located in T2N R1W Section 12. To date (August 2016) this web author has been unable to figure out who Hewlett is.

Early Hewlett Point ...
According to the Informational Sign at Frenchmans Bar Park, Hewlett Point was once called "Broughton Point", after William Broughton, of the British Captain George Vancouver Expedition. In 1792 Broughton became the first European to explore the Columbia River.

An 1860 cadastral survey (tax survey) for T2N R1W does not have Hewlett Point labeled. Comparing to a modern topographic map, Section 12 of the cadastral survey shows today's Hewlett Point is located on the Donation Land Claim (DLC) of William Dillon.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management's General Land Office (GLO) Records database shows William H. Dillon and Harriet Dillon being granted title to 641.85 acres of T2N R1W Sections 1, 2, 11, and 12, on August 27, 1871 (1850 Oregon-Donation Act).

The 1888, U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey's "Columbia River Sheet No.6, Fales Landing to Portland" (Chart No.6145) has "Hewlett's Pt." labeled.

The 1897 publication "List of Beacons, Buoys, and Day Marks on the Pacific Coast of the United States (U.S. Government Printing Office) mentions "Outer end of wharf at Hewletts Point".

The 1897 U.S. Geological Survey's topographic map "Portland Quadrangle" shows "Hewlett Pt.".

An undated plat map for Clark County, Washington presumed to be between 1915 and 1925 (found on "rootsweb.com" website (2015)) shows the William Dillon DLC owned by E.M. Dietrich.

The 1913 Washington Geological Survey's "Bulletin No.17, A Geographic Dictionary of Washington" lists "Hewlett Point. A low point on the east bank of Columbia River, 2 miles below the mouth of Willamette River, in Clarke County."

In 1914 the U.S. Board Geographic Names made "Hewlett Point" official. A variant on the named in use was "Hewletts Point".


Early Maps ...

Image, 1897, topographic map, Shillapoo Lake and Vancouver Lake,  click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
1897 Topographic Map detail showing "Hewlett Pt.", Shillapoo Lake, Buckmire Slough, and Vancouver Lake. U.S. Geological Survey's "Portland Quadrangle", 1:62,000 scale, original courtesy Perry-Castaneda Library, University of Texas Libraries, 2018.


"Hewlett's Point", 1903 ...
POST LIGHT CHANGES
Alterations in Aids to Navigation in Lower Columbia

"Captain C.G. Calkins, lighthouse inspector, has issued notice of the following change in aids to navigation in this district:

Dobelbower Landing Post Light -- October 1, 1903, this fixed white-lens lantern light was discontinued, being no longer required owing to change in the channel.

Cottonwood Island Shoal Range Lights -- October 1, 1903, the following described range lights were established to guide through the channel over Cottonwood Island Shoal: ...

Knapp Landing Range Lights -- October 1, 1903, these fixed white lantern lights were discontinued, being no longer required owing to change in the channel.

Reeder Point Post Light -- October 1, 1903, this light was moved about five-eighths of a mile south of its former location, and is now suspended 25 feet above the water, from an arm on a white stake. Tangent to Hewlett's Point, southeast by south. Tangent to South Point McIntyre's Slough, south.

Lower Willow Bar Lower Post Light -- October 1, 1903, a fixed white lantern light, suspended, 22 feet above the water, from an arm on a single pile in the river, was established on the east side of the new cut channel abreast Knapp Landing. Reeder Point, south one-eighth west. Tangent to Halfway Point, northwest three-fourths north.

Lower Willow Bar Upper Post Light -- October 1, 1903, a fixed white lantern light, suspended, 22 feet above the water, from an arm on a single pile in the river, was established on the east side of the new-cut channel abreast Knapp Landing and distant about three-eighths of a mile, south-southeast 1/4 east, from the lower light. Reeder Point, south three-fourths west. Tangent to Halfway Point, north-northwest, three-fourths west.

Upper Willow Bar Range Lights -- October 1, 1903, the following described range lights were established to guide through the channel over Upper Willow Bar: ...


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", October 9, 1903, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.


"Broughton Point" ...
According to the information sign at Frenchmans Bar Park, today's Hewlett Point was once called Broughton Point after William Broughton, of the British Captain George Vancouver Expedition. In 1792 Broughton became the first European to explore the Columbia River.
[More]

Image, 2005, Information Sign, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Information Sign, Frenchmans Bar Park. The sign is located at the extreme upstream end of Frenchmans Bar Park, looking towards Hewlett Point. Image taken July 3, 2005.
Image, 2005, Information Sign, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Information Sign, Frenchmans Bar Park, showing Broughton Point, today's Hewlett Point. The sign is located at the extreme upstream end of Frenchmans Bar Park, looking towards Broughton Point. Image taken July 3, 2005.


Views ...

Image, 2005, Barn, Tree, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Barn and tree at Hewlett Point, as seen from Frenchmans Bar Park. Image taken July 3, 2005.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, March 30, 1806 ...




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:
  • Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016;
  • Landis, H., 1917, "A Geographic Dictionary of Washington", Washington Geological Survey Bulletin No.17;
  • NOAA Office of Coast Survey website, 2005;
  • "Rootsweb.com" website, 2015;
  • U.S. Bureau of Land Management General Land Office (GLO) Records database, 2007;
  • U.S. Geological Survey, Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database, 2007;


All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/hewlett_point.html
February 2018