Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Gnat Creek, Oregon"
Includes ... Gnat Creek ... Gnat Creek Fish Hatchery ...
Image, 2013, Gnat Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Gnat Creek, Oregon. Image taken September 22, 2013.


Gnat Creek ...
The approximately 11-mile-long Gnat Creek heads at the base of Nicolai Mountain and generally flows northwest and north to the Clatskanie/Beaver Slough floodplain where it merges into Blind Slough at approximate Columbia River Mile (RM) 27 just south of Saspal Slough and the Oregon community of Brownsmead.


Early Gnat Creek ...
Gnat Creek was once known as "Knotts Creek". In 1986 the U.S. Board of Geographic Names made "Gnat Creek" the official name.

Gnat Creek Hatchery ...
"Gnat Creek Hatchery was constructed in 1960 as part of the Columbia River Fisheries Development Program (Mitchell Act) -- a program to enhance declining fish runs in the Columbia River Basin. The facility is used for egg incubation and rearing of spring chinook and winter steelhead. Most of the production is released off-station. ...

Spring chinook and winter steelhead fill the fish raceways at Gnat Creek Hatchery. The hatchery is also the home of a cutting-edge oxygen supplementation system that will increase productivity of hatchery fish and therefore enhance the local recreational fishing opportunities. ...

The hatchery is located 18 miles east of Astoria on Hwy.30. ...

Steelhead are available to the angler from December through February and for the fisherman seeking spring chinook, May to July is the best time at Gnat Creek. The hatchery provides 2-1/2 miles of easy fishing access for spring chinook and winter steelhead.

Three nature trails wind through a Coast Range forest and the Nicolai-Wickiup Watershed, providing visitors with miles of recreational opportunities. The trails begin at Gnat Creek hatchery ...

Gnat Creek flows over an ancient basalt lava delta (Columbia River Basalt flows) that has been lifted by pressure to form the coast range. Gnat Creek falls nearly 2,000 feet over several water falls in just four short miles where it flows into the lower Columbia."


Source:    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Visitor's Guide, 2016.


[More]


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife website, 2016;    U.S. Geological Survey, Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) database, 2016;

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
May 2016