Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Birds etc.
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Crown Point, Oregon"
Includes ... Crown Point ... "Thor's Crown" ... "Thor's Heights" ... "Thor's Point" ... "Castle Sinclair" ... "Cape Eternity" ... Vista House ... "Crown Point Falls" ... Campsite of November 2, 1805 ... The Golden Age of Postcards ... Views from Crown Point ... "Crown Point Chalet" ... "Gardiner's Cafe" ... "Vista Cafe" ...
Image, 2005, Crown Point from Portland Women's Forum Scenic View, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point and Vista House. View from Portland Women's Forum Scenic Viewpoint (formerly Chanticleer Point). Image taken October 22, 2005.


Crown Point ...
Crown Point is a large lava flow feature on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 129, with Rooster Rock at its base and Rooster Rock State Park stetching upstream. Across from Crown Point, on the Washington State side of the Columbia River, lies Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge and Point Vancouver, the fartest upsream of Lieutenant Broughton in 1792 of the Captain George Vancouver expedition. Upstream of Crown Point is Latourell Falls and Shepperds Dell. Also upstream are Bridal Veil Falls and Multnomah Falls. Downstream of Crown Point is Tunnel Point, a pullout along Interstate 84 which presents fantastic views of Crown Point. Fantastic views of Crown Point and Vista House can be seen from the Portland Women's Forum Scenic Viewpoint, formerly known as "Chanticleer Point", located downstream. The Historic Columbia River Highway leads to Crown Point and Vista House.

Image, 2004, Crown Point from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon. Crown Point as seen from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon. Image taken March 20, 2004.
Image, 2006, Crown Point from Rooster Rock State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon. View from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon. Image taken April 24, 2006.


Crown Point Lava Flow ...
Crown Point represents a lava flow which filled an ancient channel of the Columbia River 14.5 million years ago to a total thickness of nearly 700 feet. . Crown Point is an excellent exposure of thick (over 500 feet) Priest Rapids intracanyon flow overlying a bedded Priest Rapids hyaloclastite (more than 140 feet).

"... In the face of the bluff, the lower 130 feet of the fill is palagonite tuff, carried westward and foreset bedded by the ancestral Columbia River. Lava then advanced onto the hyaloclastic fill, piling up quickly in a series of flows to a thickness of 555 feet. The entire thickness of lava congealed as one coolling unit with an 80-foot basal colonnade and a very thick (475 feet) hackly entablature. ..." [Norman and Roloff, 2004]

The Priest Rapids is a member of the Wanapum Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), and erupted in the middle Miocene. The lack of basalt pillows at the lava/hyaloclastite contact suggests that the hyaloclastite was not excessively wet when the lava flowed over it. Rooster Rock, on the downstream side of Crown Point, is a landslide block which came off of the west side of Crown Point. The landslide scar is visible on the cliff above.


Crown Point Geology ...
"The Columbia River Gorge is a spectacular river canyon cutting the only sea-level route through the Cascade Mountain Range. It's 80 miles long and up to 4,000 feet deep with the north canyon walls in Washington State and the south canyon walls in Oregon State. Six to 17 million years ago, the Columbia River Plateau was created by a series of basalt flows. The flows covered 164,000 square kilometers -- portions of northeast Oregon, southwest Washington and western Idaho, and consisted of about 300 individual flows. As it flooded the regions lowest areas, it filled canyons and permanently altered the Columbia River's path on several occasions. Today, these flows are exposed along the cliffs of the Columbia River Gorge. These lava flows altered the course of the Columbia River many times, one of them creating today's Crown Point. Fourteen million years ago a massive eruption of the Columbia River basalt began near the present Washington-Idaho border. Lava from this eruption flowed westward and was funneled into the Columbia Gorge, flowing down the ancient channel beneath Vista House. The lava eventually covered over 50,000 square kilometers of the Pacific Northwest, and completely filled and overtopped the old Columbia River channel, obliterating it. Part of that ancient lava-filled channel now is exposed at Crown Point. It extends from near the freeway level to Vista House, a height of nearly 650 feet. There are two layers of material in the channel that tell the story of how that river channel was abandoned. The lower 180 feet of the channel is a product of the lava eruption but it is not a lava flow. As the 14 million year old lava approached the ancient Columbia River Gorge, it encountered the Columbia River. When the lava advanced into the water, the water chilled the molten lava along its margins causing the lava to freeze and violently shatter into sand to cobble size fragments. These fragments flowed ahead of the advancing lava as a slurry of chilled lava particles and water. The remains of this slurry fill the lower part of the channel. The liquid lava then flowed over the slurry filling and eventually overtopping the channel, forcing the Columbia River to find a new route. The view from Vista House on the old scenic highway not only overlooks the 14 million year old channel but several other channels of the Columbia River including the present day one."

Source:    Stephen Reidel, 2004, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Image, 2004, Rooster Rock and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rooster Rock and Crown Point. Rooster Rock and Rooster Rock State Park are at the base of Crown Point, as seen from Interstate-84, Oregon, Tunnel Pullout. Vista House is just visible perched on top of Crown Point. Image taken September 26, 2004.
Image, 2003, Crown Point from downstream Cape Horn, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, Crown Point, Oregon. Crown Point as seen from Washington State Highway-14 pullout, downstream of Cape Horn, Washington. Image taken June 25, 2003.


Crown Point and the Missoula Floods ...
The 700-foot-high Crown Point was inundated during peak of the Missoula Floods. Flood waters eroded away softer material, highlighting the spectacular cliff face of the lava flow.
[More]

Views of the Cliff Face ...

Image, 2005, Crown Point from Washington Highway 14, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Early morning, Crown Point. Note waterfall on the left. View from Washington State Highway 14. Image taken May 24, 2005.
Image, 2004, Crown Point sunset as seen from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sunset on Crown Point, Oregon, as seen from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, Oregon. Image taken September 26, 2004.
Image, 2006, Crown Point from Rooster Rock State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon. View from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon. Image taken April 24, 2006.
Image, 2006, Crown Point from Rooster Rock State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon. View from moving car, Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken April 24, 2006.


Early Crown Point ...
Noted Historian Lewis L. McArthur in Oregon Geographic Names (2003), wrote that he was unable to determine when the name "Crown Point" was first used. McArthur writes that the original settler of the area, Lorens Lund, homesteaded on the high ground near and including Crown Point, and, according to Lund's daughter, Lorens Lund called the top of the bluff "The Point". Lund later donated the land for Vista House. Credit for the name "Crown Point" is often given to Marshall Dana of the Oregon Journal who used the name when discussing plans for Vista House.

"Thor's Crown" - Crown Point in 1940 ...
A passage from the 1940 publication "Oregon, End of the Trail", by the Works Projects Administration (WPA) of the State of Oregon.

"... Winding along the forested mountainside the highway reaches CROWN POINT, 167.3 m., 725 feet above the river on an overhanging rocky promontory. The highway makes a wide curve, in the center of which is the VISTA HOUSE. This impressive stone structure, a modern adaptation of the English Tudor style of architecture, modified to conform to the character and topography of the landscape, was built at a cost of $100,000. The foundation about the base of the Vista House is laid in Italian-style dry masonry, no mortar having been used. Men were imported from Italy to work here and elsewhere along the highway. The windswept height, once known as THOR'S CROWN, commands a view of the river east and west for many miles. ..."


"Thor's Heights" and "Thor's Point" ...
Besides "Thor's Crown", another name used for Crown Point during the early 1900s was "Thor's Heights".

"... From Thor's Heights one looks down at the fertile cove known as Horseshoe Bend, amid which Rooster Rock rises like a sentinel. ..." ["Sunday Oregonian", September 13, 1914]

H.H. Riddell, in his 1914 article "The Columbia River Highway" (Mazama, vol.4, no.3, December 1914), used "Thor's Point".


"Cape Eternity" ...
The Columbia River, Its History, Its Myths, Its Scenery, Its Commerce, by William Denison Lyman, 1909, G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York, p.359-360.

"... A few miles below Cape Horn it becomes apparent that we are about to issue from the mountain pass. The heights have fallen away. Deep valleys appear and many habitations attest the cultivable character of the rgion. BUt as if to show that she has not exhausted her resources, wonder-working Nature has set one more masterpiece in the long line, and this is Rooster Rock, with a mighty rampart of rock adjoing and closing the southern horizon. Together they mark the wester limit of the mountains. That rampart, which was once well named Cape Eternity, though the name does not seem to have been preserved, is a sheer massive precipice of a thousand feet. Though not nearly so high as some of the cliffs above, it is not surpassed by any for the appearance of solid and massive power. Rooster Rock is distinguished by a singular and exquisite beauty, rather than magnitude or grandeur. It is only three hundred and fifty feet high, but in form and colour and alternation of rock and trees it is one of the most beautiful objects on the River. ..."


Image, 2004, Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point. View from The Portland Womans Forum Scenic View (formerly Chanticleer Point). Image taken October 11, 2004.
Image, 2004, Crown Point, Oregon, from Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point as seen from Bridal Veil. Image taken October 11, 2004.


Campsite of November 2, 1805 ...
Lewis and Clark's campsite of November 2, 1805 was near Rooster Rock and below Crown Point.
[More]

Image, 2003, Rooster Rock State Park and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rooster Rock, Rooster Rock State Park, and Crown Point. Rooster Rock and Rooster Rock State Park are at the base of Crown Point. Image taken June 25, 2003.
Image, 2004, Crown Point from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, Crown Point, Oregon. Crown Point as seen from Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon. Image taken March 20, 2004.


Crown Point from Washington State Highway 14 ...
Pullouts along Washington State Highway 14, west of the Cape Horn Viewpoint, provide spectacular views of Vista House and Crown Point.

Image, 2005, Crown Point, Oregon, from Steigarwald Lake, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon, as seen from Steigerwald Lake, Washington. View from Washington State Highway 14. Image taken, June 29, 2005.
Image, 2005, Vista House from Washington State Highway 14, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon, as seen from Washington State Highway 14. Image taken, June 19, 2005.


Crown Point Places, etc.

  • Crown Point Chalet ...
  • Gardiner's Cafe ...
  • Vista House ...
  • Waterfall at Crown Point ...
  • More Views of Crown Point ...

Crown Point Chalet ...
On the south side of Crown Point, on a bluff overlooking Vista House and the point, was once located the "Crown Point Chalet", a famous roadhouse along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The Crown Point Chalet was built in 1915 by Mrs. Margaret Henderson, who was also a part of the history of Chanticleer Inn and the short-lived Latourell Falls Chalet.

"... Leaving the Chanticleer Inn to have her own eating establishment, Mrs. Henderson built the short-lived Latourell Falls Chalet in 1914 and it was an immediate success. Unfortunately, it burned just three months after opening and she lost everything, including a fine library and handcrafted furniture. With her ambitious spirit and strong determination, Mrs. Henderson, or Bidy, as she was called, set out almost immediately to build again. Bidy enlisted the help of many of Portlandís prominent businessmen, who bought $20 dinner books. This time, she chose a spot overlooking picturesque Crown Point and christened the new establishment The Crown Point Chalet. ... Dignitaries far and wide would make their way to the Crown Point Chalet to experience Mrs. Hendersonís legendary hospitality and country-fried chicken served in the ambiance of a mountain chalet. ..." ["PDXHistory.com" website, 2006]

The Finest Dinners!
The Grandest View

HOMELIKE AS YOU WOULD LIKE IT
DINNERS THRU THE DAY AND EVENING,
NO OVER NIGHT ACCOMODATIONS



CROWN POINT CHALET
"Where Rolls The Oregon"
HOME OF MRS. HENDERSON'S
FAMOUS CHICKEN DINNERS


On Columbia River Highway - adjoining Vista House



Source:    Ad in "The Automobile Blue Book", 1919


Crown Point Chalet closed in 1927 with the declining health of Mrs. Henderson. The building was demolished in the 1950s. A narrow road to the south of the Vista House parking area leads to the Chalet's location.

Penny Postcard, Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Mrs. Henderson's Chalet, Crown Point." Photo copyright Cross & Dimmitt. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2013, Crown Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Road to Crown Point Chalet, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Gardiner's Cafe ...
Between Vista House and the Crown Point Chalet was "Gardiner's Cafe" which opened in 1922 as Johnsonís Confectionary. In later years it was known as Vista Cafe. It was torn down by the U.S. Forest Service in 1963.

Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Aerial view, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, with Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Vista House - Crown Point 'On the Columbia River Highway'." Photo by A.M. Prentiss. Published by The Rose City News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #7. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Building lower right corner is the "Crown Point Chalet". Between Vista House and the Crown Point Chalet is "Gardiner's Cafe".


Vista House ...
The Vista House was built in 1916 at the same time as the Columbia River Highway - today known as the Historic Columbia River Highway. It is still the only route to Crown Point.
[More]

Image, 2004, Vista House and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Vista House and Crown Point. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2004, Crown Point and Vista House, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon. View from The Portland Womans Forum Scenic View (formerly Chanticleer Point). Image taken October 10, 2004.


Waterfall at Crown Point ...
On the upstream side of Crown Point is an unnamed stream and unnamed falls, nicely visible during heavy rains. This falls is one of many falls in the Columbia River Gorge. The "Crown Point Falls" can be seen from pullouts along Washington State 14, or from the Oregon side along Interstate 84.

Image, 2005, Crown Point from Washington Highway 14, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Waterfall at Crown Point, Oregon. View from Washington State Highway 14. Image taken May 24, 2005.


More Views of Crown Point ...

Image, 2004, Rooster Rock and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rooster Rock and Crown Point. Rooster Rock and Rooster Rock State Park are at the base of Crown Point, as seen from Interstate-84, Oregon, Tunnel Pullout. Vista House is just visible perched on top of Crown Point. Image taken October 10, 2004.
Image, 2004, Crown Point sunset as seen from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sunset on Crown Point, Oregon, as seen from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, Oregon. Image taken September 26, 2004.
Image, 2005, Crown Point from Shepperd's Dell Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point as seen from Shepperd's Dell Bridge, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2004, Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point. View from The Portland Womans Forum Scenic View (formerly Chantecleer Point). Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2004, Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge and Crown Point. View from The Portland Womans Forum Scenic View (formerly Chanticleer Point). Image taken October 10, 2004.
Image, 2003, Crown Point from downstream Cape Horn, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, Crown Point, Oregon. Crown Point as seen from Washington State Highway-14 pullout, downstream of Cape Horn, Washington. Image taken June 25, 2003.
Image, 2004, Crown Point as seen from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crown Point, Oregon, as seen from Tunnel Point, Interstate 84, Portland, Oregon. Vista House is at the top, and Onion Rock is in the lower right. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2005, View upstream from Tunnel Point, I-84, Portland, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Looking upstream from Tunnel Point at Rooster Rock, Crown Point and Vista House, and Onion Rock. Interstate 84 is on the right. Image taken November 19, 2005.


"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.

Penny Postcard, Crown Point and NO Vista House, Oregon, ca.1916
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point before Vista House, Oregon, ca.1916.
Penny Postcard, ca.1916, "Crown Point and Rooster Rock. Along Columbia River Highway, Oregon." Published by the Oregon News Company. Card #O-16. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Aerial view, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, with Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Vista House - Crown Point 'On the Columbia River Highway'." Photo by A.M. Prentiss. Published by The Rose City News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #7. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

Building lower right corner is the "Crown Point Chalet", which was built in 1915 and closed in 1927. The building was demolished in the 1950s. Between Vista House and the Crown Point Chalet is "Gardiner's Cafe". Gardinerís Cafe opened in 1922 as Johnsonís Confectionary. In later years it was known as Vista Cafe. It was torn down by the Forest Service in 1963.

Penny Postcard, Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Mrs. Henderson's Chalet, Crown Point." Photo copyright Cross & Dimmitt. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1930
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1930.
Penny Postcard, ca.1930, "Crown Point and Vista House, Columbia River Highway, Oregon". Caption on back reads: "Crown Point 25.5 miles from Portland, Oregon. A view of 35 miles both East and West can be seen from Vista House." Copyright Cross & Dimmitt. Published by Angelus Commercial Studio, Portland, Oregon. Card #2. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1943
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon, ca.1943.
Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1943, "Vista House, Columbia River Highway, Oregon." The Crown Point Chalet is visible in the background on the right above Vista House. Image copyright Angelus Studio. Published by Wesley Andrews Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #859. Card is postmarked August 18, 1943. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, from below, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Crown Point, 'On the Columbia River Highway', and Vista House from Columbia River, Over 600 Feet Below.". Photo by A.M. Prentiss. Published by the Rose City News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #27. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

Caption on back reads: "Crown Point, 25 miles from Portland, Oregon. The summit of Crown Point covers and area of about two acres and is 725 feet above sea level. It is famous for its magnificent view of 25 miles both east and west of the mighty Columbia River. 'Vista House', on the summit of the crest, erected as a memorial to pioneers, and also as a resting place for Highway visitors.".

Penny Postcard, View of the Columbia River Gorge from Crown Point, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: View of the Columbia River Gorge from the Historic Columbia River Highway, Crown Point, Oregon, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Columbia Gorge looking East from Crown Point, Columbia River Highway, Oregon." Image Copyright Weister Co. Published by Chas. A. Lipscheutz Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #325. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.

Caption on back reads: "Columbia Gorge from Crown Point. Columbia Gorge from Crown Point showing Cape Horn and Castle Rock in the distance. This view shows the concrete supports on the brink of Thor's Heights, and is one of the most prominent view-points along the Columbia River."



Views from Crown Point ...

Good views of the Columbia River can be seen from Crown Point and Vista House. Upstream views include Rooster Rock and Rooster Rock State Park, Shepperds Dell, Youngs Creek, Sand Island, Dalton Point, Beacon Rock, and Cape Horn and Phoca Rock. Across the Columbia is Steigerwald Lake and Point Vancouver. Downstream views include Reed Island and Tunnel Point. Off in the distance is Washougal, Washington.

Image, 2008, View from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Painting the view from Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken July 27, 2008.
Image, 2004, Rooster Rock State Park and Cape Horn, as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon, and Cape Horn, Washington, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken October 11, 2004.
Image, 2005, Columbia River looking upstream from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River, looking upstream, as seen from Crown Point, Oregon. Rooster Rock State Park and Youngs Creek are on the right. Beacon Rock, Phoca Rock, and Cape Horn are all visible. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2004, Columbia River Gorge, as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, looking upstream, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. The Historic Columbia River Highway is in the foreground. Image taken October 10, 2004.
Image, 2004, Columbia River Gorge, as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, looking upstream, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. The Historic Columbia River Highway is in the foreground. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2006, Columbia River Gorge, as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Gorge, looking upstream, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. The Historic Looking at the Columbia River Highway in the foreground and Youngs Creek (Shepperds Dell) on the lower right. Sand Island is in the middle ground with Dalton Point jutting into the Columbia. Phoca Rock is just visible on the left and Beacon Rock is in the background. Image taken October 21, 2006.
Image, 2006, Steigerwald Lake and Point Vancouver, as seen from Vista House, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Steigerwald Lake, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken October 21, 2006.
Image, 2004, Steigerwald Lake and Point Vancouver, as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Steigerwald Lake and Point Vancouver, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. The Historic Columbia River Highway is in the foreground. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2004, Rooster Rock as seen from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon, as seen from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken October 10, 2004.
Image, 2004, Reed Island, Washington, as seen from Crown Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Reed Island, Washington, as seen from Crown Point, Oregon. Steigerwald Lake NWR is in the distance (right) on the Washington shore. Rooster Rock State Park, Oregon, is in the foreground. Image taken October 11, 2004.
Image, 2005, Tunnel Point and Onion Rock, from Crown Point, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tunnel Point and Onion Rock, from Crown Point, Oregon. View from Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, November 2, 1805 ...
Examined the rapid below us [from their camp at Fort Rains, looking at the Cascade Rapids] more pertcelarly the danger appearing too great to Hazzard our Canoes loaded, dispatched all the men who could not Swim with loads to the end of the portage below, I also walked to the end of the portage with the carriers where I delayed untill everry articles was brought over and canoes arrived Safe. here we brackfast and took a Meridn. altitude 59į 45' 45" about the time we were Setting out 7 Squars came over loaded with Dried fish, and bear grass neetly bundled up, Soon after 4 Indian men came down over the rapid in a large canoe.     passed a rapid at 2 miles & 1 at 4 miles opposite the lower point of a high Island on the Lard Side [Bradford Island], and a little below 4 Houses on the Stard. Bank, a Small Creek on the Lard Side [Tanner Creek] opposit Straw berry Island [Hamilton Island], which heads below the last rapid, opposit the lower point of this Island [Hamilton Island] passed three Islands covered with tall timber [today there are two, Ives and Pierce] opposit the Beatin rock [Beacon Rock]     Those Islands are nearest the Starboard Side, imediately below on the Stard. Side passed a village of nine houses [Skamania and Skamania Landing], which is Situated between 2 Small Creeks [Woodward Creek and Duncan Creek], and are of the Same construction of those above; here the river widens to near a mile, and the bottoms are more extensive and thickly timbered, as also the high mountains on each Side, with Pine, Spruce pine, Cotton wood, a Species of ash, and alder.     at 17 miles passed a rock near the middle of the river [Phoca Rock], about 100 feet high and 80 feet Diamuter,     proceed on down a Smoth gentle Stream of about 2 miles wide, in which the tide has its effect as high as the Beaten rock [Beacon Rock] or the Last rapids at Strawberry Island [Hamilton Island],- Saw great numbers of waterfowl of Different kinds, Such as Swan, Geese, white & grey brants, ducks of various kinds, Guls, & Pleaver [today just below Beacon Rock is Franz National Wildlife Refuge]. ...     we encamped under a high projecting rock on the Lard. Side [Rooster Rock, with Crown Point rising above it],     here the mountains leave the river on each Side [leaving the Columbia River Gorge, Steigerwald Land NWR is on the north and the Sandy River delta is on the south], which from the great Shute to this place is high and rugid [Columbia River Gorge]; thickly Covered with timber principalley of the Pine Species. The bottoms below appear extensive and thickly Covered with wood.     river here about 2Ĺ miles wide.     Seven Indians in a Canoe on their way down to trade with the nativs below, encamp with us, those we left at the portage passed us this evening and proceeded on down The ebb tide rose here about 9 Inches, the flood tide must rise here much higher- we made 29 miles to day from the Great Shute [Cascade Locks]-





Columbia River GorgeReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CASCADE RANGE VOLCANOES | CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: Allen, J.E., and Burns, M., 1986, Cataclysms on the Columbia, Timber Press; "The Automobile Blue Book", 1919; Friends of Vista House website, 2004; Lyman, W.D., 1909, The Columbia River, Its History, Its Myths, Its Scenery, Its Commerce, G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York; McArthur, L.A., and McArthur, L.L., 2003, Oregon Geographic Names, Oregon Historical Society Press, Portland; Norman, D.K., and Roloff, J.M., 2004, A Self-Guided Tour of the Geology of the Columbia River Gorge - Portland Airport to Skamania Lodge, Stevenson, Washington, Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources Open File Report 2004-7, March 2004; Oregon Department of Transportation website, 2004; "PDXHistory.com" website, 2006; Reidel, S., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, website, 2004; Riddell, H.H., 1914, "The Columbia River Highway", IN: Mazama, vol.4, no.3, December 1914; Tolan, T.L., Beeson, M.H., and Vogt, B.F., 1984, Exploring the Neogene History of the Columbia River: Discussion and Geologic Field Trip Guide to the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon Geology, Vol.46, No.8, August 1984, and Vol.46, No.9, September 1984, Published by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/crown_point.html
© 2013, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
January 2011