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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Crestview and Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon"
Includes ... Crestview Manor ... Menucha ... Historic Columbia River Highway ...
Image, 2016, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Crestview Manor ...

"Edward Ehrman, a Portland wholesale grocer, constructed this mansion, earlier known as "Ehrmanor," as a summer home for his family. Architect A.E. Doyle, who also designed structures such as the Multnomah County Library, the first Menucha mansion, and the Multnomah Falls Lodge, designed this beautiful structure in the English Cottage style. The Manor was constructed over a two-year period using imported stone from Italy and the finest cherry wood for its interior. Located high atop the cliffs overlooking a spectacular view of the Columbia River Gorge, this original 11,000 square foot summer retreat included amenities such as an open truss ceiling, three large fireplaces, banks of French doors, tennis court, swimming pool and a reflecting pond.

In 1933, the Ehrman family sold the estate to second owner, Jim Roby who stayed at the manor during the summers. The third owner, Edwin Hollinshead, acquired the property and changed the name to "Crestview Manor" as a place for large business parties and formal balls. Patriotically supporting the home front during World War II , the carriage house and barn were remodeled into apartments to provide free housing for local school teachers.

Then in 1952, the Northwest District of the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel (now the North Pacific District) purchased the property, developing a whole new purpose for the former show piece. 1953 marked the first summer of youth and children's camps held at Crestview, a tradition that continues to this day."


Source:    Camp Crestview website, 2015


Views ...

Image, 2016, Crestview Manor sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crestview Manor sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Camp Crestview sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Rock climbing tower, Crestview Manor, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Menucha ...

"In 1874, John Painter, an English sailor whose ship wrecked in Hawaii some years earlier, fled the island with his Hawaiian wife when family members were threatened with confinement to a leper colony. The Painters aimed for Oregon and homesteaded Menucha. Their orchard still bears fruit.

Forty years later, Julius Meier, partner in the Meier and Frank department stores, envisioned a country retreat. He scouted a site away from the bustle of Portland and the distractions of a political career – one that would see him become Governor of Oregon from 1931 to 1935. The Meier family purchased the Painter property and named it “Menucha,” a place of rural elegance where notables like Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt came for visits.

Initially, the Meiers reached Menucha from Portland by steam-power up the Columbia. But, in 1913, just as the Model-T automobile was rolling off assembly lines, ground was broken on the Northwest’s first major paved highway — in the Gorge. Now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the “poem in stone” became the first Scenic Highway in America.

The primary residence, now known as Wright Hall, was built in the 1920’s. Designed by architect Herman Brookman, Wright Hall influenced what became known internationally as a “Northwest” style of architecture. In 1950, First Presbyterian Church of Portland purchased the property from the Meier family, who were pleased to see it dedicated as an ecumenical center, a gift in perpetuity to communities of people from around the world. Today, we continue this elegant legacy hosting guest groups from all over the world as well as offering our own programs."


Source:    "Menucha.org" website, 2015


Views ...

Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stone gate, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Stone gate, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Road, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wright Hall, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.

Today's Wright Hall was the original home of the Julius Meier family.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wright Hall, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.

Today's Wright Hall was the original home of the Julius Meier family.
Image, 2016, Menucha sign, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Ballard Hall, Menucha, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.

Today's Ballard Hall was originally built for use by the Meier’s children and grandchildren.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Camp Crestview website, 2015    "Menucha.org" website, 2015;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
December 2015