Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Columbia River ... Wartime"
Includes ... Civil War ... World War I ... WWI ... World War II ... WWII ... Korean War ... Vietnam ...
Image, 2008, Vancouver, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Remembrance Wall, Vancouver, Washington. Image taken October 12, 2008.


Whitman Mission, 1847, and Cascades Massacre, 1856 ...
  • Vancouver Barracks ...
    This first American military post in the Pacific Northwest was established in May 1849 in response to killings of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman in 1847.
  • Cascades Rapids, Washington ... (Bonneville Dam)
    On March 26, 1856, Native Americans of the Yakama, Klickitat, and Cascades tribes attack American settlers who were living along the Cascade Rapids. Ten settlers and 3 soldiers were killed.

Civil War ...
  • Fort Cape Disappointment ... (Fort Canby)
    In 1862, during the Civil War, Cape Disappointment was armed with 22 smoothbore cannons to protect the mouth of the Columbia River from enemies. It was generally known as "Fort Cape Disappointment". It wasn't until 1874 that the cape was given the name "Fort Canby." to honor General Edward Canby, who was assassinated druing the Modoc Indian Wars. Fort Canby was closed after World War II.
  • Fort Stevens ...
    In 1865 Fort Stevens, on the Oregon side of the mouth of the Columbia River, was built to protect the North against an English invasion from Canada, should the British join the Civil War on the Confederate side.
  • Union Ridge ... (Ridgefield, Washington)
    The area of today's Ridgefield, Washington, was first settled in 1839 when Irish immigrant James Carty took up residence on Lake River. In 1852 and 1853 Arthur Quigley and Frederick Shobert arrived and settled on property next to Lake River. Both settlers established mud landings on their properties where river steamers could offload their goods and take on loads of farm products. Thus, "Shobert's Landing" became the common name for the area. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan (2010), the community got its next name, "Union Ridge", during the Civil War. According to a reporter who visited the area in 1875, this was because "all the settlers, save one, were outspoken Union men". When the first post office was established in 1865, the name became official. The post office name was then changed to Ridgefield in 1890 at the urging of the new postmaster, S.P. Mackey, who was originally from Virginia, and not keen on the name Union Ridge.

World War I ...
  • Columbia City, Oregon, Shipyard ...
    According to the "Columbia-City.org" website (2016): "During World War I the Sommarstrom Brothers built a shipyard with four bays - to build four ships at once - in the South part of Columbia City where River Club Estates is now located. They hired a large crew and built wood ships for the U.S. Government. When the war ended, the ship contracts were cancelled."
  • St. Johns, Oregon, Shipyard ...
    According to the "shipbuilding.com" website (2016), the Grant Smith-Porter Ship Company began in 1917 with a yard in Aberdeen, Washington, and another yard in St. Johns, Oregon. Twenty-eight wooden cargo ship hulls were built at the St. Johns' yard between 1918 and 1919.
  • Vancouver Spruce Mill ... (Vancouver Barracks)
    During World War I, Vancouver Barrack's Parade Ground became the home to a large spruce mill, supplying wood for planes for the War.

World War II, Korea, and Vietnam ...
  • Bonneville Dam ...
    According to Bonneville Dam District National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form (1987): "During World War II, Bonneville was the focus of concern as a target for attack or sabotage. During the war the Corps employees painted all of the buildings green, including the roofs. Even the gravel and blacktopped roadways were painted with camouflage. The Corps mounted concrete "pill boxes" to flank the main entry road mid-way between the Auditorium and the railroad viaduct. Other concrete guard stations, with gun ports, were set up near the dam and powerhouse on Bradford Island. Additionally in 1942 the Corps experimented with smoke screening, filling the gorge with dense clouds of partially burned diesel fuel ejected from nozzles and from an open ditch on Bradford Island. None of these precautions was tested. The Bonneville Project emerged unmolested from the war."
  • Cannon Beach ... ("dim out" roads)
  • Fort Canby ...
  • Fort Columbia ...
  • Fort Stevens ...

  • Kaiser Shipyards ...
    During World War II, three Kaiser-owned shipyards were located along the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. One was located along the Columbia River in Washington State at Ryan Point, Vancouver (Kaiser Shipyard), and two were located along the Willamette River in Oregon at St. Johns (Oregon Shipbuilding Yard) and Swan Island (Swan Island Yard). On September 27, 1941, the Oregon Shipbuilding Yard launched the region's first liberty ship near the St. Johns bridge.

  • Port Westward ... (trestle)
    The original Port Westward was purchased from the federal government in the mid-1960s after it had served as the Beaver Army ammunity depot, from which hundreds of thousands of tons of high explosives were brought in by rail the same rail line that runs through Columbia County today and shipped to the Pacific Theatre during World War II and also the Korean War. [The Clatskanie Chief, August 1, 2012]

  • Portland Assembly Center ...
    Portland's Exposition Center was used as a detention center for 3,500 Japanese Americans during five months of 1942. The Expo Center was known as the "Portland Assembly Center" and served as a staging center for the internees' relocation to Hunt, Idaho facilities.

  • Vancouver Barracks ...

  • Vancouver Remembrance Wall ...
    Vancouver, Washington's "Remembrance Wall" was painted in 2005 to honor military veterans from World War II to Vietnam. Commissioned by the Clark County Mural Society, the mural is located just west of the Railroad underpass at Columbia and 4th streets, on the north side of a 550-foot-long retaining wall owned by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe.

  • Japanese Bomb near Fort Stevens ...
  • Family killed by air balloon ...
  • Megler (or Skamokawa ???) plane observation site ...
  • Bunkers ...


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/columbia_river_wartime.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
October 2016