Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Columbia Park, Washington"
Includes ... Columbia Park ... Columbia Drive ... Regional Veterans Memorial ... "Kennewick Man" ...
Image, 2004, Camping at Columbia Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Camping at Columbia Park, Richland, Washington. "Little Chinook" set up at camp, with my "Corps of Discovery" members Lissa, Keeley, and Genna. Image taken September 26, 2004.


Columbia Park ...
Columbia Park is located on the right bank (south) of the Columbia River (Lake Wallula) between River Miles (RM) 330 and 335. The park covers nearly 606 acres and is located off Highway 240 between Richland, Washington, and Kennewick, Washington. The park offers excellent views of the Pasco-Kennewick "Blue Bridge". At the park's upstream end is located Bateman Island, the farthest up the Columbia that Lewis and Clark explored.

Columbia Drive ...
Columbia Drive, which follows the right bank of the Columbia River, was the first Federal Highway in the Northwest. This two-lane road was constructed of concrete. An interpretive sign located at the intersection of Edison Street and Columbia Drive commemorates this significant historic achievement. This historic highway follows the path Lewis & Clark used in exploring this up-river section of the Columbia.

Views around Columbia Park ...

Image, 2006, River Walk, Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken October 1, 2006.
Image, 2006, Camping at Columbia Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Camping at Columbia Park, Richland, Washington. "Little Chinook" set up in camp with my "Corps of Discovery" members Genna and Lissa. Image taken September 30, 2006.


Regional Veterans Memorial ...
Columbia Park's Regional Veterans Memorial was built to honor all the veterans of Tri-Cities region. The memorial consists of one 40-foot column and 10 smaller ones, totaling 60 tons of granite.

"... The granite, excessed by the Department of Energy for the memorial, has a history that goes back to Cold War-era Hanford. It was quarried in California’s Sierra Nevada, acquired by the government in 1968, and shipped to Minnesota where the slabs were polished to precision tolerances. They were brought to Hanford’s 306 Building to be used as surface plates for precise measurements using laser interferometers, and they were used there until 1990. ..." [Hanford website, 2006]

"... The memorial consists of ten separate free-standing granite monoliths. A 40 foot granite column stands center, marked with a gold star with the American flag flying proudly at the top to represent the sacrifice of those who have died while in service to the country. Standing on the right side of the center column is a silver star column recognizing those who served in the military and on the left a blue star granite column recognizing those still in the service. The other granite columns placed within the 100’ diameter circular plaza adjacent to the Columbia River, displays bronze plaques that recognize the armed forces of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast guard and Merchant Marines. ..." [City of Kennewick website, 2006]

The primary column of the memorial is the largest freestanding piece of granite in the United States. The memorial was dedicated on May 14, 2004.


Image, 2006, Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken October 1, 2006.
Image, 2006, Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken October 1, 2006.
Image, 2006, Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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Flag, Regional Veterans Memorial, Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken October 1, 2006.


Views from Columbia Park ...

Good views of Richland, Washington and the Pasco-Kennewick "Blue Bridge" can be seen from the walking path along the Columbia River at Columbia Park. The Columbia River is part of Lake Wallula, popular for water sports.

Image, 2006, Richland sunset from Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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Richland sunset as seen from Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken September 29, 2006.
Image, 2006, Pasco-Kennewick 'Blue Bridge
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Pasco-Kennewick "Blue Bridge", night shot, as seen from Columbia Park, Washington. Image taken September 29, 2006.
Image, 2006, Sunset, water skiing, from Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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Sunset, water skiing. View from Columbia Park. Image taken September 30, 2006.
Image, 2006, Sunset, water skiing, from Columbia Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sunset, water skiing. View from Columbia Park. Image taken September 30, 2006.
Image, 2006, Pasco-Kennewick 'Blue Bridge
Click image to enlarge
Sunset, water skiing, with the Pasco-Kennewick "Blue Bridge". View from Columbia Park. Image taken September 30, 2006.
Image, 2005, Blue Bridge from Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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"Blue Bridge" from Columbia Park, Richland, Washington. Image taken September 24, 2005.
Image, 2003, Columbia River from Columbia Park, click to enlarge
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Columbia River from Columbia Park, Richland, Washington. View along Columbia Drive. Image taken September 29, 2003.

"... there is no timber of any Sort except Small willow bushes in Sight in any direction ..." [Clark, October 17, 1805]


Kennewick Man ...

According to the "Washington HistoryLink Database":

"On July 28, 1996, the bones known as Kennewick Man were found in the shallows of the Columbia River near Columbia Park, Washington. The U.S. Government seized the bones and ruled that the remains were Native American because they predate 1492. The Government ordered the remains turned over to the Umatilla, Yakama, Colville, Wanapum, and Nez Perce tribes in Eastern Washington. Eight anthropologists, including two from the Smithsonian Institution, filed suit to examine the remains. Preliminary forensic examination suggested an individual different from the typical pre-historic Native American. The bone fragments were taken to the Burke Museum at the University of Washington on October 29, 1998, where scientists examined them. The remains were determined to be 9,000 years old, but DNA testing was inconclusive as to their ethnic origin. On September 25, 2000, Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbit decided that the remains of Kennewick Man are "culturally affiliated" with Native Americans and ordered them turned over to five tribes in eastern Washington. On October 25, 2000, a Federal judge in Portland questioned the Government's conclusion and scheduled arguments as to the nature of the remains. In June 2001, Kennewick Man reposes at the Burke Museum in Seattle."


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 17, 1805 ...
I took two men in a Small Canoe and assended the Columbia river 10 miles to an Island [Bateman Island] near the Stard. Shore on which two large Mat Lodges of Indians were drying Salmon, ... there is no timber of any Sort except Small willow bushes in Sight in any direction - from this Island the natives showed me the enterance of a large Westerly fork which they Call Tâpetêtt [Yakima River] at about 8 miles distant, the evening being late I deturmined to return to the forks [Snake River with the Columbia River, to their camp at today's Sacajawea State Park], at which place I reached at Dark.     from the point [Sacajawea State Park] up the Columbia River is N. 83° W. 6 miles to the lower point of an Island near the Lard. Side     passed a Island in the middle of the river at 5 miles [Clover Island] at the head of which is a rapid, not dangerous on the Lard Side opposite to this rapid is a fishing place 3 Mat Lodges, and great quants. of Salmon on Scaffolds drying. ...

[Today the Pasco-Kennewick "Blue Bridge" is located at the upsteam head of Clover Island and the "Cable Bridge" is located on the downstream side.]

The Waters of this river is Clear, and a Salmon may be Seen at the deabth of 15 or 20 feet. West 4 miles to the lower point of a large island [Bateman Island] near the Stard. Side at 2 Lodges, passed three large lodges on the Stard Side near which great number of Salmon was drying on Scaffolds ...

[Today Columbia Park is located on the south side of the Columbia between Clover Island and Bateman Island, and stretches from Kennewick to Richland, with Pasco on the other side. Today these three cities are known as the "Tri-Cities".]

I Set out & halted or came too on the Island at the two Lodges [Bateman Island]. Several fish was given to me, in return for Which I gave Small pieces of ribbond from those Lodges the natives Showed me the mouth of Tap teel River [Yakima River] about 8 miles above on the west Side this western fork appears to beare nearly West, The main Columbia river N W.- a range of high land to the S W [Horse Heaven Hills] and parralal to the river and at the distance of 2 miles on the Lard. Side, the countrey low on the Stard. Side, and all Coverd. with a weed or plant about 2 & three feet high and resembles the whins. I can proceive a range of mountains to the East which appears to bare N. & South distant about 50 or 60 miles [Blue Mountains]. no wood to be Seen in any derection ...





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources: City of Kennewick website, 2004, 2006; Handford website, 2006; Richland Chamber of Commerce website, 2004; Tri-Cities Visitor and Convention Bureau website, 2004; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2004, Walla Walla District; Washington HistoryLink Database website, 2004.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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September 2008