Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Home Regions Campsites Penny Postcards My Corps of Discovery Image Index Links About This Site Main Menu
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Canneries along the Columbia River"
Includes ... Altoona ... Astoria ... Cathlamet ... Clifton ... Eagle Cliff ... Rooster Rock ... The Dalles ... Warrendale ... Westport ...

  • 1857 ... Westport, Oregon, salted salmon ...
  • 1862 ... Oak Point, Oregon, salted salmon ...
  • 1866 ... Eagle Cliff, Washington, first Columbia River cannery ...
  • 1866 ... Oak Point, Wallace Island, Tenasillihe, and Chinnook Beach ...
  • 1867 ... Eagle Cliff, Washington, second cannery ...
  • 1869 ... Cathlamet, Washington, Warren Packing Co. ...
  • 1869 ... Westport, Oregon, first cannery on the Oregon side ...
  • 1870 ... Eagle Cliff cannery sold ...
  • 1871 ... Brookfield, Washington ...
  • 1873 ... Bayview, Washington ...
  • 1873 ... Clifton, Oregon, second cannery on the Oregon side ...
  • 1873 ... Astoria, Oregon, first cannery in Astoria ...
  • 1873 ... Only Columbia River canneries ...
  • 1873 ... Dissolution: Hapgood and Hume at Eagle Cliff ...
  • 1873 ... Notice: Hapgood at Waterford ...
  • 1874 ... Astoria, Oregon, second cannery in Astoria ...
  • 1874 ... Eureka, Washington, and Rainier, Oregon ...
  • 1874 ... George Hume sells Eagle Cliff cannery to Cutting Packing Company ...
  • 1874 ... 12 canneries ...
  • 1875 ... Cutting Packing Company, Astoria ...
  • 1875 ... 17 canneries ...
  • 1875 ... Hanthorn Cannery, Astoria, Oregon ...
  • 1876 ... Knappton, Washington ...
  • 1876 ... Glen Ella, Three Tree Point, and Pillar Rock, Washington ...
  • 1876 ... New canneries, Astoria, Oregon ...
  • 1876 ... Kinney Cannery, Astoria, Oregon, third cannery in Astoria ...
  • 1876 ... Hume sold out ...
  • 1876 ... Large pack and new canneries, North Shore (just below Knappton), Knappton, and Astoria ...
  • 1877 ... Pillar Rock, Washington ...
  • 1877 ... 30 canneries ...
  • 1879 ... First fish trap, Baker Bay ...
  • 1881 ... Union Packing Company, Astoria ...
  • 1881 ... Samuel Elmore Cannery, Astoria ...
  • 1881 ... Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon ...
  • 1881 ... Hungry Harbor, Washington ...
  • 1881 ... 35 salmon canneries ...
  • 1883 ... 55 canneries ...
  • 1884 ... McGowan, Washington ...
  • 1884 ... "Banner Year" ...
  • 1885 ... Hammond, Oregon ...
  • 1885 ... Eureka & Epicure Packing Company, Washington ...
  • 1886 ... Second Samuel Elmore Cannery, Astoria ...
  • 1888 ... White Star Cannery burns ...
  • 1889 ... Rooster Rock, Oregon ...
  • 1889 ... Fisherton, Glen Ellen, and Ocean canneries ...
  • 1889 ... 22 canneries ...
  • 1892 ... Columbia River Packing Company, Astoria ...
  • 1892 ... U.S.C. & G.S. Topographic "Columbia River" Sheets ...
  • Dodson and Warrendale, Oregon ...
  • Ilwaco, Washington ...
  • 1896 ... Union Fisherman's Co-Operative Packing Company ...
  • Cannery Pier Hotel ...
  • 1898 ... Third Samuel Elmore Cannery, Astoria ...
  • 1898 ... Astoria canneries burn ...
  • 1899 ... Columbia River Packers Association ...
  • 1902 ... Tallant-Grant Cannery, Astoria ...
  • 1903 ... Clatskanie, Mayger, Rainier, and Willow Grove ...
  • 1903 ... Altoona, Washington ...
  • 1904 ... 16 canneries Lower Columbia, 4 Upper Columbia ...
  • 1910 ... Bumble Bee begins ...
  • 1916 ... Rooster Rock Cannery moves to Ellsworth ...
  • 1919 ... 23 salmon canneries ...
  • 1922 ... 9 shad canneries ...
  • 1966 ... U.S. National Historic Landmark, Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon ...
  • 1970 ... 5 canneries left ...
  • 1973 ... White Star Cannery burns (again) ...
  • 1980 ... Bumble Bee Seafoods, last Columbia River cannery closes ...


Canneries along the Columbia ... (timeline)

1857 ... Westport, Oregon, salted salmon:
About 1857 John West began salting salmon in barrels at Westport, Oregon, on the lower Columbia River.


1861 ... Oak Point, Oregon, salted salmon:
In 1861 H.N. Rice and Jotham Reed began packing salted salmon in barrels at Oak Point, 60 miles below Portland. The first season's pack amounted to 600 barrels.


1866 ... Eagle Cliff, Washington, first Columbia River cannery:
In 1866 William Hume and his brother George, along with canning expert Andrew Hapgood, under the name of Hapgood, Hume & Co., built the first cannery on the Columbia River at Eagle Cliff, Washington, and put up 4,000 cases of salmon (48 cans per case). By 1971 only pilings can be seen of the cannery location.


1866 ... Oak Point, Wallace Island, Tenasillihe, and Chinook Beach
"... The year this first cannery operated the following fishermen were operating in the river: Jotham Reed used a trap and a small gill net opposite Oak Point; Mr. Wallace fished a small sein from the shore of an island of that name a short distance below; John T.M. Harrington (who was later to establish the Pillar Rock cannery), in conjunction with a man named Fitzpatrick, operated a seine at Tenasillihe, as did also a Mr. Welch; P.J. McGowan ... operated two small seins at Chinook Beach; and Hapgood, Hume & Co. had two small gill nets about 125 fathoms in length and 32 meshes deep. The gill net of Mr. Reed was much smaller than these. At this period the river literally swarmed with salmon and the cannery had no trouble in packing 4,000 cases, which it increased to 18,000 the next year and to 28,000 cases in 1868. ..."

Source:    Pacific Salmon Fisheries report, 1917

Image, Eagle Cliff Cannery, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Eagle Cliff Cannery, first salmon cannery on the Columbia River. Image from the "Pacific Fisherman: Year Book", 1920, p.69.


1867 ... Eagle Cliff, Washington, second cannery:
In 1867 (1868 ???) as Columbia River salmon quickly became popular and profitable, George Hume split with his brother and joined with Isaac Smith. They began a second cannery at Eagle Cliff, 1/4 mile below the original cannery. They were soon joined by brother Robert, leaving William and Andrew Hapgood to run the first cannery. In 1870 William and Andrew Hapgood sold their cannery back to brother Robert, who subsequently sold it and left in 1873 to built a cannery at Bay View, near Skamokawa.


1869 ... Cathlamet, Washington:
In 1869, Frank Warren, operating as the Warren Packing Co., built at cannery at Cathlamet (the cannery building was still standing in 2012). Warren Packing Co. later established a second cannery upstream at Warrendale, Oregon.


Image, 2005, Cathlamet, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Cathlamet, Washington. Cathlamet, Washington, as seen from Puget Island. Image taken March 5, 2005.


Yellowish building with red roof is the River Rat Tap Tavern and the long dark red roofed building to its left is the old Warren Cannery building. The River Rat Tap Tavern appeared in the 2000 film "Men of Honor". The Warren Cannery was established in 1869. The Cathlamet Channel is in the foreground.
Image, 2011, Cathlamet, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Remains of the Warren Cannery, Cathlamet, Washington. Image taken August 7, 2011.


1869 ... Westport, Oregon, first cannery on Oregon side:
In 1869, the first cannery on the Oregon side of the Columbia River was built by John West at Westport, Oregon, Clatsop County. In 1881 West moved his cannery to Hungry Harbor, Washington.


1870 ... William Hume and Andrew Hapgood sell Eagle Cliff cannery:
In 1870 William Hume and Andrew Hapgood sold their Eagle Cliff cannery back to brother Robert, who subsequently sold it and in 1873 left to built a cannery at Bay View, near Skamokawa, Washington.


1871 ... Brookfield, Washington:
In 1871 (according to the 1917 publication "Pacific Salmon Fisheries") the firm of Megler & Jewett established a cannery on the present site of Brookfield, Washington (just east of Jim Crow Point) and named it in honor of Mrs. Megler's birthplace, North Brookfield, Massachusetts. In 1876 Joseph Megler bought out his partner and took in Mr. Macleay, and changed the firm name to J.S. Megler & Co.. In 1879 Mr. Megler bought out this partner. (Another source says in 1873, Joseph Megler opened a cannery at Brookfield.)


1873 ... Bayview, Washington:
In 1873 Robert Hume built a cannery at Bayview (often seen spelled "Bay View"), a mile downriver from Skamokawa, Washington. The cannery provided a market for commercially caught salmon from the Columbia River.


1873 ... Clifton, Oregon, second cannery on the Oregon side:
In 1873, the 2nd cannery in Clatsop County was built by the Cook brothers in Clifton, Oregon. As of 2012 this building is still standing.

Image, 2012, Clifton, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Remains of fishing industry, Clifton, Oregon. The top of the old Clifton Cannery building is just visible in the background. Image taken September 22, 2012.


1873 ... Astoria, Oregon, first cannery in Astoria:
In 1873, Baddolet & Company built the first cannery in Astoria. The location of this cannery was at 33rd and Marine Drive, today the site of a Safeway Store.

Image, 2014, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Safeway store, once a cannery location, Astoria, Oregon. Photographed from moving car. Image taken August 4, 2014.


1873 ... Columbia River canneries:
By 1873 there were no other canneries on the Coast except those on the Columbia River.

"... There were no other canneries on the Coast in 1873 except those on the Columbia River, and only five or six there. Hapgood & Hume, and George W. Hume at Eagle Cliff, F.M. Warren at Cathlamet a few miles below, R.D. Hume at Bay View a little below Cathlamet, and J.G. Megler at Brookfield, all in Washington, and John West at Westport, Oregon. ..."

Source:    Pacific Fisherman: Year Book, 1920


1873 ... Dissolution: Hapgood and Hume at Eagle Cliff:

Dissolution.

THE PARTNERSHIP heretofore existing between the undersigned under the firm name of Hapgood, Hume & Co., doing business at Eagle Cliff, Wahkiacum county, W.T., is this day dissolved, by mutual consent.
A.S. HAPGOOD.
WILLIAM HUME.

Eagle CLiff, October 1st, 1873.



Source:    Tri-Weekly Astorian, November 20, 1873.


1873 ... Notice: Hapgood at Waterford:

Notice.

THE UNDERSIGNED, (late of Hapgood, Hume & Co.), has established himself at WATERFORD, Wahkiacum county, W.T., under the firm name of HAPGOOD & CO., where he will carry on the business of packing fresh preserved Salmon in tins.
A.S. HAPGOOD.

Eagle Cliff, October 1st, 1873.
Post-office address: Eagle Cliff, Wahkiacum county, Washington Territory.



Source:    Tri-Weekly Astorian, November 20, 1873.


1874 ... Astoria, Oregon, second cannery in Astoria:
In 1874 the Adair brothers, S.D. and John, Jr., built the second cannery in Astoria, then named A. Booth & Co. Later S.D. Adair bought another cannery on the Columbia and operated it under the firm name of S.D. Adair & Co. In 1881 he sold out his interest in A. Booth & Co. and instead formed a partnership with Wm. B. Adair under the name of S.D. Adair & Co.


1874 ... Eureka, Washington, and Rainier, Oregon:
In 1874 Joseph Hume, another Hume brother, built a cannery at Eureka, Washington, close to Eagle Cliff and his brother Robert Hume built one at Rainier, Oregon (which he later sold to George Myers).


1874 ... Eagle Cliff cannery sold:
In 1874 George Hume sold his Eagle Cliff cannery to the Cutting Packing Company.


1874 ... 12 canneries:
By 1874 there were 12 canneries in business between Astoria and Portland.


1875 ... Cutting Packing Co., Astoria, Oregon:
The Cutting Packing Company began in 1875 at the west end of Astoria, in an area which would become known as "Uniontown". By 1892 the Cutting Packing Company had become the Columbia River Packing Company.


1875 ... 17 canneries:
By 1875, there were 17 salmon canneries in operation in the vicinity of Astoria on both sides of the river.


1875 ... Hanthorn Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
In 1875 the J.O. Hanthorn Cannery (Hanthorn & Co.) was built at the foot of 39th Street in Astoria. In 1899 this early cannery joined the Columbia River Packer's Association. It was then used as a cold storage plant.

Image, 2013, CRPA buildings, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Packer's Association - original Hanthorn Cannery buildings, 39th Street, Astoria, Oregon. Image taken July 30, 2013.


1876 ... Knappton, Washington:
In 1876 the Hume brothers, who brought salmon canning to the Columbia River in 1867, built a cannery just west of the small Washington community of Knappton. Eventually known as the "Eureka and Epicure Packing Company", the Knappton cannery operated until 1897 when it was abandoned. In 1899 the U.S. Government bought the old cannery site for use as a Quarantine Station. Between 1899 and 1938, hundreds of Chinese, Japanese, and European laborers went through the station. The station closed in 1938. The station's hospital building, built in 1912, is now a museum. In 1971 the wharf was damaged by a storm making it unsafe. It was demolished in 1975.

Image, 2004, Knappton site looking towards Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Knappton Site looking towards Oregon. View from the historic Quarantine Station, once the location of the Knappton Cannery. Image taken April 9, 2004.
Image, 2007, Knappton Quarantine Station, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, Knappton Quarantine Station. Image taken October 13, 2007.


1876 ... Glen Ella, Three Tree Point, and Pillar Rock, Washington:
Also in 1876 Mr. Hepburn built a cannery at Glen Ella, Washington (just below Bayview), and Jas. Laidlaw and John Fitzpatrick built a cannery at Three Tree Point, just below Glen Ella. John Harrington and Everding & Farrell built a cannery at Pillar Rock.


1876 ... New canneries, Astoria, Oregon:
In 1876, M.J. Kinney, Robert Hume, and John Devlin.


1876 ... Kinney Cannery, Astoria, Oregon, third cannery in Astoria:
In 1876 (some sources say 1879) the Kinney Cannery was built between 5th and 6th Street in Astoria. This was the third cannery built in Astoria and the first to be built in the downtown area. By 1891 the Kinney Cannery was the largest salmon packing plant in Astoria. In 1894 the cannery burned to the ground but was rebuilt on its original pilings. Canning was discontinued around 1920 and the building served as a central machine shop and warehouse for the Columbia River Packers Association (later called Bumble Bee) until 1980. In 1989 the Kinney Cannery (Marshall J. Kinney Cannery) was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Architecture/Engineering, Event, #89000515). It was removed from the Register in 1997. The area was developed with small local shops known as the No.10 Sixth Street Building and an observation tower viewing the Columbia was built. In December 2010 a fire destroyed the complex including the Gunderson Cannery Cafe across the street, and 27 small businesses lost everything. The viewing tower remains.

Image, 2013, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Columbia River Viewing Tower, Astoria, Oregon. The Kinney Cannery use to be at this location. Image taken September 4, 2013.


1876 ... Hume sold out:
In 1876 Robert Hume sold out to his brother George and headed south to the Rogue River to fish.


1876 ... Large pack and new canneries, North Shore (just below Knappton), Knappton, and Astoria:
According to the "Pacific Fishermen: Year Book, 1920", "... the pack was large in 1876, being some 450,000 cases. A good many canneries were built that fall and the following spring, among them one at North Shore by John West, another at Knappton by Jos. Hume, also J.O. Hanthorn and several co-operative canneries, among them the "Fishermen's", the "Scandinavian Fishermen", the "White Star", the "Eagle", "Occident", and "I.X.L." in Astoria. ..."

Image, 2013, Scandinavian Cannery Road, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Scandinavian Cannery Road, Astoria, Oregon. View from moving car heading east. Image taken October 1, 2012.
Image, 2013, Scandinavian Cannery Road, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Scandinavian Cannery Road, Astoria, Oregon. View from moving car heading west. Image taken February 2, 2013.


1877 ... Pillar Rock, Washington:
In 1877 (some sources say 1878), John Harrington built the Pillar Rock Cannery, named for a prominent basalt column rising high above the river's surface that featured prominently on the cannery's labels. The Pillar Rock Cannery packed salmon from 1877 to 1947. With the decline of the salmon industry the cannery switched to crab and other fish.

Image, McGowan Shad Label, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
LABEL: Columbia River Salmon, Spring Pack, Pillar Rock, Washington. Pillar Rock Packing, Pillar Rock, Wahkiakum Co., Wash., Everding & Farrell, Agents, Portland, Oregon, 15 1/2 oz. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


1877 ... 30 canneries:
By 1877 there were 30 canneries along the lower Columbia River, supplied by 1,000 gillnet boats.


1879 ... First fish trap, Baker Bay:
According to the "Pacific Salmon Fisheries" (John Nathan Cobb, 1921), the "first fish trap or pound on the river was constructed by Mr. Graham, in Baker Bay, on the Washington shore, in 1879. In 1881 Mr. P.J. McGowan built some traps just below the bay. The traps were very successful at times."


1881 ... Union Packing Co., Astoria, Oregon:
The Union Packing Co. was incorporated in 1881. While it was a short-lived company, it did lend its name to the "Uniontown" neighborhood, today the area surrounding the Astoria-Megler Bridge. In 1888, the "Uniontown-Alameda Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (District #88001311).


1881 ... Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
In 1875 Samuel Elmore came west and became an agent for Robert Hume in San Francisco, where he marketed canned salmon overseas. In 1878 Elmore partnered with Joseph Hume in a cannery in Astoria, and in 1881 Elmore bought out Hume.

According to the 1988 National Register for Historic Places "Uniontown" Nomination form:

"... The original Elmore Cannery was built by Samuel Elmore in 1881. In the 1893 History of Oregon, Emore "built a small cannery, purchased 15 boats, with necessary tackle, and during the (first) season packed 8,000 cases of salmon. ... The mid-1880s were boom years for the cannery and in 1886 Elmore employed 350 fisherman and 100 cannery workers and canned 37,000 cases of one-pound chinook tins. The cannery was one of the best equipped operations on the Pacific Coast. It emplyed a large number of Chinese as cannery workers, doing nearly all of the cannery's hand labor. The original cannery was replaced ca.1886 and the second plant was superseded ca.1899 when Elmore Cannery consolidated with other canneries to form the Columbia River Packing Co. It was then expanded further into the waterfront and built on pilings. ..."

Nothing remains of the first cannery Elmore built. It was located directly south of W. Marine Drive.



1881 ... Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon:
In 1881 the "Seufert Bros. Co." was established by brothers Francis Anthony and Theordore Seufert. This enterprise became one of the largest salmon fishing and processing establishments on the Columbia River. The brothers owned the majority of of the fish wheels surrounding The Dalles, and their cannery was located at The Dalles, Oregon. The Cannery building burned in 1973. Today all that remains is a remnant stone wall near The Dalles Dam's visitor center, and a fish wheel foundation near the river.

Penny Postcard, Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1909
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Seufert Brothers Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, ca.1909 Penny Postcard, Dated 1909, "Seufert Brothers Col, Salmon Cannery, The Dalles, Oregon, The Dalles in the Distance.". Mount Hood, Oregon, is on the left. Published by The Portland Post Card Company, Portland, Oregon. Card #6027. Hand-written message on card is dated January 3, 1909. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2011, The Dalles, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Seufert Brothers Cannery wall, NW corner, The Dalles, Oregon. Image taken October 6, 2011.


1881 ... Hungry Harbor, Washington:
In 1881 John West moved his cannery from Westport, Oregon to Hungry Harbor, Washington.

Penny Postcard, 1940s-1950s, Hungry Harbor, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Hungry Harbor, Washington. Penny Postcard, ca.1940s-1950s, "Hungry Harbor.". Caption on back reads: "Old fish-net drying docks near Knappton, Washington at the mouth of the mighty Columbia River." Color by John F. McNamara. Published by Columbia View Cards, Ocean Park, Washington. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


1881 ... 35 salmon canneries:
By 1881, thirty-five salmon canneries had been established on the Columbia River. A list of those canneries, together with the pack of each during the year in question, was listed in the 1917 report "Pacific Salmon Fisheries" by J.N. Cobb for the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries.

"... Of the 35 canneries on the Columbia River in 1881, it is said that about one-half had been established by the Hume brothers. G.W. and William Hume were partners in the firm of Hapgood, Hume & Co., on the Sacramento River, and established the first cannery on the Columbia. In 1881 William was the proprietor of two canneries, one at Astoria, Oreg., and one at Eagle Cliff, Wash. R.D. Hume, a third brother, in the same year had a cannery in operation on the Rogue River, and established three others, one at Eagle Cliff (then owned by William Hume), one at Rainier (then belonging to Jackson & Myers), and one at Astoria. The fourth brother, Joseph, came to the coast in 1871 and some time later established a cannery on the river. ..."

Source:    John N. Cobb, 1917, Pacific Salmon Fisheries, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries Document No.839

  1. J. Williams (Oregon side) ... 9,000
  2. Astoria Packing Co. ... 30,000
  3. Elmore Packing Co. ... 7,890
  4. Astoria Fishery (M.J. Kinney) ... 26,000
  5. Wm. Hume ... 20,000
  6. Geo. W. Hume ... 18,000
  7. Devlin & Co. ... 20,000
  8. Occident Packing Co. ... 15,000
  9. West Coast ... 15,000
  10. Badollet & Co. ... 25,000
  11. Booth & Co. ... 23,000
  12. Eagle Cannery ... 17,300
  13. Timmins & Co. ... 8,000
  14. Fishermen's Packing Co. ... 19,000
  15. S.D. Adair & Co. ... 10,000
  16. Anglo-American Packing Co. ... 10,300
  17. Hanthorn & Co. ... 19,000
  18. Scandinavian Co. ... 20,000
  19. J.W. & V. Cook ... 30,000
  20. F.M. Warren ... 12,000
  21. J. West ... 12, 000
  22. Jackson & Myers (2 canneries) ... 13,000
  23. Jackson & Myers ...
  24. Aberdeen Packing Co. (Washington Territory side) ... 17,000
  25. Jos. Hume, Knappton ... 20,225
  26. Pillar Rock Co. ... 15,000
  27. J.G. Megler & Co. ... 25,000
  28. Columbia Canning Co. ... 8,000
  29. R.D. Hume & Co. ... 8,300
  30. Cathlamet Cannery ... 8,000
  31. Jas. Quinn ... 5,000
  32. Cutting & Co. ... 20,000
  33. Eureka Packing Co. ... 20,000
  34. Hapgood & Co. ... 13,000
  35. Eagle Cliff Cannery ... 10,000


1883 ... 55 canneries:
In 1883 there were 55 canneries operating on the Columbia. Salmon harvests peaked in the early 1880s, with canneries producing more than 600,000 cases in a season. Salmon were so abundant in the early years of the industry canneries were not able to pack the number that were caught. The salmon decline became noticable by 1887 and by 1950 the commercial salmon industry on the Columbia River was over. The last Columbia River cannery shut down in 1980.


1884 ... McGowan, Washington:
In 1884 P.J. McGowan, along with his sons, started a cannery at McGowan, Washington, and later at Warrendale, Oregon and then Ilwaco, Washington. McGowan's Cannery was located between Chinook Point and Point Ellice. Patrick J. McGowan began to engage in salmon salting business and he established the earliest salmon packing company in Washington State. Around 1884 McGowan changed over to canning salmon when he admitted his four sons as partners and changed the name of the business to McGowan and Sons.

Penny Postcard, McGowan's Cans, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: "Two Millon Cans of Columbia River Salmon", McGowans' Cannery, McGowan, Washington, postmarked 1908. Printing on box in image reads: "McGowans' Spring Pack, 1lb. flat, Columbia River Salmon. Published for Olds, Wortman and King, Portland, Oregon. Printed in Germany. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, McGowan Shad Label, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
LABEL: Columbia River Shad, McGowan, Washington. P.M. McGowan & Sons, Distributors, 15 1/2 oz. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


1884 ... "Banner Year":
1884 was "the banner year" in the canning industry when 620,000 cases of chinook salmon were marketed. At this time the runs were so enormous that tons and tons of salmon were thrown overboard by the fishermen because the canneries were unable to handle them.


1885 ... Hammond, Oregon:
In 1885 Mr. G.H. George and W.H. Barker purchased the Point Adam Packing Company's cannery in Astoria (today Hammond) and operated it under the name of "George & Barker".

Image, 2013, Point Adams Packing Company, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Point Adams Packing Company, Hammond, Oregon. View from moving car. Image taken February 2, 2013.
Image, Point Adams Packing Co. salmon label, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
LABEL: Cardinal Salmon, Point Adams Packing Company, Hammond, Oregon. Cardinal brand, Royal Chinook Columbia River Salmon, distributed by Point Adams Packing Co., Hammond, Oregon, 7 3/4 oz. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


1885 ... Eureka & Epicure Packing Company, Washington:
In 1885 the Eureka & Epicure Packing Co. was formed, comprised of the following plants: Knappton Packing Co., Knappton; North Shore Packing Co., just below Knappton; and the Eureka Packing Co.


1886 ... Second Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
Samuel Elmore's original "Elmore Cannery", built in 1881, was replaced around 1886. This plant then was replaced in 1899 with a larger facility belonging to the Columbia River Packing Company.


1888 ... White Star Cannery burns:
A Cannery Burned.

"PORTLAND, June 12th. -- This afternoon the White Star Cannery at Astoria was destroyed by fire. The department reached the scene in a few minutes after the alarm. A heavy wind was blowing from the west and the cannery was soon one sheet of flames. The firemen with great difficulty kept the fire from spreading. Thirty feet east of the cannery is the Astoria box factory, with great piles of lumber and a $30,000 plant. Northwest and south are dwelling and business houses. The fire was held where it originated. The cannery building premises, piling, etc., were entirely destroyed. The cannery has not been in use this season. It was built in 1880 and sold to the White Star Packing Company. It was in litigation last year, and lastly was owned by Elmore & Sanborn. The proprietors estimate the loss at $15,000; insurance, $13,000. The cannery will not be rebuilt. The fire is believed to have caught from a spark from the smokestack of the Astoria Box Factory."

Source:    "Daily Alta California", vol.42, number 14165, June 13, 1888, located on "California Digital Newspaper Collection" website, August 2013.



1889 ... Rooster Rock, Oregon:
In 1889 the Columbia River Packers Association built a cannery at Rooster Rock, Oregon. The Rooster Rock cannery was located on the west side of Rooster Rock in the small bay between Tunnel Point and Rooster Rock. The Cannery was built by Antone Fastabend for Samuel Elmore. Because of constant silting of the bay where the cannery was located, it eventually was forced to move to Ellsworth on the Washington shore.

"The use of the fish-wheels and the large quantities caught by them, caused canneries to be built on the upper Columbia. Warrendale was the first one, then one at Celilo by Everding & Farrell, then McGowan's, and later the Columbia River Packers Association, who built at Rooster Rock -- since moved across the river to Ellsworth."

Source:    Pacific Fisherman: Yearbook, 1918.

Penny Postcard, Rooster Rock, Oregon, with Cannery, ca.1905
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Rooster Rock, Oregon, with Cannery ca.1905. Penny Postcard, ca.1905. "Rooster Rock, Columbia River, Oregon." Note fishwheel along side of Cannery. Published by B.B. Rich, Official Stationer. Undivided Back. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


1889 ... Fisherton, Glen Ellen, and Ocean Canneries:

"About one-third of a mile southwest from the point [Three Tree Point] there is a Salmon cannery known as Fisherton; about half a mile to the northeast there was the Glen Ellen Cannery, which has been burned and abandoned; and at one and five eighths miles to the northeast, where the low shore begins, is the Ocean Cannery."

Source:    NOAA "Coast Pilot", 1889, p.464



1889 ... 22 canneries:
The 1889 Map "Chart of the Columbia River from the Ocean to Portland, Oregon" shows 22 canneries which were operating in the 1888 to 1889 fishing season (listed downstream to upstream):

  • Washington side ...
    1. Ilwaco Cannery
    2. Chinook Cannery (McGowan)
    3. Knappton Cannery
    4. Pillar Rock Cannery
    5. Brookfield Cannery
    6. Bay View Cannery
    7. Cathlamet Cannery
    8. Waterford Cannery
    9. Eureka Cannery
    10. Eagle Cliff Cannery
  • Oregon side ...
    1. 8 Canneries in lower Astoria
    2. 3 Canneries in upper Astoria
    3. Clifton Cannery


1892 ... Columbia River Packing Co., Astoria, Oregon:
The Cutting Packing Company began in 1875 at the west end of Astoria, in an area which would become known as "Uniontown". By 1892 the Cutting Packing Company had become the Columbia River Packing Company.


1892 ... U.S.C & G.S. Topographic Map "Columbia River Sheets":
The 1892 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey's "Columbia River Sheet 2" (No.6141) and "Columbia River Sheet 3" (No.6142) show the following canneries and fisheries located between Astoria and Crims Island:

  • "Brookfield Fishery" (Washington side, downsteam Skamokawa)
  • "Cape Horn Fishery" (Washington side)
  • "Eagle Cliff Fishery" (Washington side)
  • "Eureka Fishery" (Washington side)
  • "Fitzpatricks Fishery" (on Welch Island)
  • "Jackson's Fishery" (on the southwest side of Puget Island)
  • "Joe's Fishery" (Oregon side)
  • "Tenasillihee Fishery" (on the east side of Tenasillihee Island)
  • "Waterford Fishery" (Washington side)
  • "Watson's Fishery" (Oregon side, east of Clifton)
  • "W. Humes Fishery" (Washington side)


Dodson and Warrendale, Oregon:
A cannery located in Dodson, Oregon was built by Patrick J. McGowan. Nearby in Warrendale was a second cannery of Frank Warren's, owner of the cannery in Cathlamet, Washington.

Image, 2011, Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Image, Warren Salmon Cannery, Warrendale, Oregon. Image shows two steamships, the "Dalles City" and the "Tahoma" docking at the Warren Cannery docks. From exhibit at Columbia Gorge Interpretive Center, Stevenson, Washington. Image taken July 15, 2011.


Ilwaco, Washington:
Ilwaco, Washington was a sawmill and salmon cannery town during its early years, and was the southern terminus of the Ilwaco railroad (1888-1908).


1896 ... Union Fisherman's Co-Operative Packing Company:
1896 saw the formation of the Union Fisherman's Co-Operative Packing Company, with their cannery being built in 1897. In 2005 Astoria's Cannery Pier Hotel opened, built on the pilings of the Union Fishermen's cannery site.

"... Elevated over the Columbia River on wooden pilings, the Union Fish cannery was built in 1897. The basic building, some 50 feet by 200 feet, contained equipment for gutting, filleting, packing, sealing, and cooking the fish, and labeling and storing the finished cans. ... Between the shore and the cannery were ranks of wooden racks for drying the gillnets, so called because the mesh of the net caught the migrating salmon behind their gills. Alongside the drying racks were some of the small gillnet boats, powered by two triangular sails. Under sail, the boats resembled butterflies, giving rise to the term “butterfly fleet” for the gillnet fishermen. Union Fish expanded over the years to become one of the largest packers in Astoria. The steep decline of the canned salmon industry led to the sale and dissolution of Union Fish in 1975. ..."

Source:    Oregon Historical Society website, 2006

Image, 2005, Net loft, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Union Fishermen's Cooperative Packing Company Net Loft, Astoria, Oregon. Image taken February 19, 2005.


Cannery Pier Hotel:
"... The Cannery Pier Hotel rests on the 100 year-old pilings that formerly supported the Union Fisherman's Cooperative Packing Company. Formed in 1897, it was the result of a turbulent time that favored big business cannery owners instead of the fishermen. Disputes with cannery owners about prices per fish started in 1876, with fishermen going on strike, and in 1880 they formed the Columbia River Fishermen's Protective Union. Tensions came to a head in 1896 when the fishermen went on strike again. Two strike-breakers were shot and more violence threatened, and the Oregon National Guard was called in to break the strike. After this, about 200 fishermen (mostly Finnish) came together, pooled their resources, and formed the Union Fisherman's Cooperative Packing Company. By 1904, it had become the largest cannery in Astoria. It remained a fishermen-owned business until the late 1940s. ..."

Source:    "CanneryPierHotel.com" website, 2012

Penny Postcard, Astoria Cannery, ca.1920, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Astoria Salmon Cannery, ca.1920. Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Salmon Cannery, Columbia River, Astoria, Oregon." Published by Wesley Andrews Co., Baker, Oregon. Card #505. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2012, Columbia Pier Hotel, Astoria, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Cannery Pier Hotel, Astoria, Oregon. Photographed from moving car. Image taken January 27, 2012.


1898 ... Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
In 1898 Samuel Elmore began construction on a new wharf and new cannery building at the foot of Flavel Street. In 1937 when Albacore Tuna was discovered in abundance off the coast of Oregon, the Elmore cannery expanded, with new additions being built to cover the handling of the tuna. The four-acre complex became home to the "Bumble Bee" label until the complex closed in 1980. Between 1966 and 1993 the property was listed as a U.S. National Landmark as the longest continuously-operated salmon cannery in the United States. The buildings burned in 1993.


1898 ... Astoria canneries burn:
An Astoria Fire

"ASTORIA, Ore., May 25. -- The largest fire in this city in recent years occurred this afternoon, completely destroying the box factory of the Clatsop Mill company, the Columbia cannery, belonging to B.A. Seaborg, the Pacific Union cannery, belonging to the Union fishermen, and Leinenweber cannery. The fire started in the engine room of the box factory, and, fed by a brisk wind, soon wiped out the buildings near by. The total loss is $50,000 and the insurance is $20,000. A man named Johnson was badly injured by falling timbers , and several persons were painfully burned."

Source:    "Los Angeles Herald, May 26, 1898, courtesy of the California Digital Newspaper Collection website, 2013.


1899 ... Columbia River Packers Association:
In 1899 seven canneries in Astoria, Oregon combined their plants and equipment to form the Columbia River Packers Association. They were the Eureka & Epicure Packing Co., the plants of Samuel Elmore, M.J. Kinney, and J.W. Seaborg, all of Astoria; J.O. Hanthorn & Co., Astoria; Fishermen's Packing Co., Astoria; Scandinavian Packing Co., Astoria; Columbia Canning Co., and J.W. & V. Cook of Clifton. Mr. A.B. Hammond was made president and Mr. S. Elmore, vice-president.
[More]

"The Columbia River Fishermen's Protective Union went on strike in 1896 to demand higher prices for their fish, in light of the diminishing Chinook runs on the Columbia. The cannery owners were ineffective in their efforts to deal with the union as a united front and the fishermen were given a slight increase in their take. The outcome of this strike made the large Astoria cannery owners inclined to form a cooperative agreement amongst themselves. In 1899 the Columbia River Packers Association was incorporated; it was comprised of seven canning companies with ten canneries along the Columbia River and a large plant at Bristol Bay, Alaska. Samuel Elmore was the organization's vice president and was a major force in bringing the cannery owners to the agreement. Particularly notable about this new venture was that each participating owner was either bought out or given stock equal to the value of their cannery and their land. The company then centralized operations, using the Elmore plant as the main cannery and using the other cannery locations for uses such as office space and cold storage."

Source:    U.S. National Park Service website, 2013, National Historic Landmarks Program, Samuel Elmore Cannery.


1902 ... Tallant-Grant Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
"The Tallant-Grant Packing Co. complex is comprised of a series of buildings which reflect the growth of the salmon industry and the various cannery businesses located at the site. The complex is built on pilings which extend over the Columbia River. The original building, constructed in 1902, is located on the east side of the complex. The twin gabled structure is rectangular in plan and is sited parallel to the shoreline. The gable ends are clad with vertical boards and the rest of the building is sheathed with horizontal boards. ...   The building is constructed on a concrete slab. The 1908 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map that denotes one half of the building as the "Butchering and Cleaning" area and the other half as the "Cold Storge" on the first floor and "Net Storage" on the second floor. The maps also show an area denoted as fishermen's cabins. The cabins were located on a semi-circular arm which extended from the west side of the main complex. Net Racks Wharfs were also located adjacent to the fishermens cabins. The cabins were demolished prior to 1924. The Tallant-Grant Packing Co. boat storage warehouse and canned salmon storage was located south of the railroad tracks. The buildings located on the north and directly west of the original structures were added in the late 1920s or early 1930s. The two buildings to the north are wooden structures covered with a low pitched gabled roofs. The addition south of the original building on the west side was the last addition, ocurring sometime in the 1940s. The addition has a shed roof which is clad with horizontal wood siding. Both the upper and lower stories have rows of pane windows with nine lights each.

The Tallant-Grant Packing Co. was incorporated November 8, 1902 by W.E. Tallant, C.W. Fulton and H.M. Bransford. The company "preserved and packed" salmon and had a starting capital stock of $100,000. William Tallant was the president of the company and Peter Grant of Goldfield, Nevada was the Vice President in 1903. The salmon was packed under the names Lotus, Top Grade and American. ...   In 1927 Tallant changed the ...   name to the Tallant Packing Co. and in 1930 he leased it to Byron Stone. The property was sold to Fred Bendstrup in 1935, who sold it the same year to the Northwestern Ice and Cold Storage Co. of Portland. In 1949, Paragon Packing Co. was incorporated and located in the cannery building. More recently the building uses included a fish receiving and packing company, cold storage plant and a feed manufacturer. The building is in the process of rehabilitation."

Source:    1988, Uniontown-Alameda Historic District National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form (#88001311).



1903 ... Clatskanie, Mayger, Rainier, and Willow Grove:
By 1903 the Union Fishermen's Co-Operative Packing Company expanded with receiving stations being built at Clatskanie, Mayger, and Rainier, Oregon, and Willow Grove, Washington.
[More]

Image, 2012, Mayger, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Mayger Fish Station, Mayger, Oregon. Overcast gray day. Image taken August 27, 2012.


1903 ... Altoona, Washington
In 1903, Hans Peterson logged 830 acres of property, named the new community "Altoona" and began the Altoona Mercatile and Fish Company Cannery. By 1910 the Altoona Cannery ranked fourth among the Columbia River canneries. A fleet of 25-foot sail-rigged gillnet boats operated out of Altoona fishing at night, when nets were invisible to the salmon. In 1947 the Altoona Cannery closed and in the late 1990s the cannery came crashing down into the Columbia River.

Image, 2004, Altoona Cannery location, Altoona, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Altoona Cannery location, Altoona, Washington. In the late 1990s the Altoona Cannery collapsed into the Columbia. Image taken April 9, 2004.


1904 ... 16 canneries Lower Columbia, 4 Upper Columbia:
"The indications for an early run of fish are excellent, as the weather is warm and fishermen who have been engaged in illegal fishing during the past few days report making fairly good catches.

Preparations have been made for handling a much greater amount of fish than was packed last year. Four new canneries have been built and several of the cold-storage plants have enlarged their capacity and one new one installed. There will be 16 canneries on the lower river ready for operation on April 15 as follows:

Co-Operative, Tallant-Grant Packing Company, Sanborn-Cutting Company, Columbia River Packers' Association, two canneries in Astoria, A. Booth Packing Company, McGowan at Ilwaco and McGowan's, North Shore Megler's, Altoona Packing Company, Pillar Rock Packing Company, Eureka, Eagle Cliff, Warren at Cathlamet and Bay View.

On the upper river the canneries will be the Rooster Rock, Warrendale, McGowan's and Seufert. The cold-storage plants to be operated on the lwoer river are as follows:

Co-Operative, Tallant-Grant Packing Company, Sanborn-Cutting Company, S. Schmidt & Company, Warren Packing Company, J. Lindenberger, Vendessysel, Columbia River Packers' Association and Martin Booth."


Source:    "Morning Oregonian", April 15, 1908, courtesy Historic Oregon Newspapers Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, 2016.



1906 ... First purse seine:
According to the "Pacific Salmon Fisheries" (John Nathan Cobb, 1921), the "first purse seine on the river was operated by William Graham & Co. in 1906."


1910 ... Bumble Bee began:
According to the "Bumblebee.com" website (2013) the history of Bumble Bee began in 1899 when seven canners in Astoria formed the Columbia River Packers Association (CRPA) and set out to fish and process salmon. In 1900 they purchased several sailing ships and began building a cannery on Alaska's Bristol Bay, and in 1910 the Bumble Bee Brand was born as one of the CRPA marketed labels. At the same time Albacore tuna was discovered in seasonal abundance off the Oregon coast. By 1920 the CRPA began expanding its cannery in Astoria to capitalize on the Albacore. Between 1930 and 1950, Albacore surpassed Salmon as the company's principal product and Bumble Bee became one of the most respected premium labels for canned seafood. In 1960 the first Bumble Bee Seafoods, Inc. was formed, and throughout the 60s and 70s the company grew, acquiring other canneries. In 1980 Bumble Bee suspended canning operations in Astoria, the location where it all began. Bumble Bee continues today as Bumble Bee Seafoods, LLC, and, by 2004 it became the largest branded seafood company in North America.

Image, 2013, Columbia River Packing Association, Bumble Bee brand, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bumble Bee Seafoods, Columbia River Packers Association, Pier 39, Astoria, Oregon. Image taken July 30, 2013.


1916 ... Rooster Rock Cannery moves to Ellsworth ...
Rooster Rock Cannery to Move.

VANCOUVER, Wash., Nov.3. -- (Special.) -- The Rooster Rock cannery for salmon is to be removed to a site on the W.X. Morgan place on the Columbia River just above Ellsworth, it is reported, and men already are at work making preparations to build the cannery. The machinery will be shipped down the river and put in this cannery. It is said that the building will cost from $6000 to $10,000 and that the Change is made desirable by the changing sands near the old cannery."


Source:    "The Morning Oregonian", November 4, 1916, courtesy University of Oregon Historic Newspapers Digital Archives, 2015.



1919 ... 23 salmon canneries:
In 1922 the following list of "Columbia River Canned Salmon Pack" appeared in "Pacific Fisherman: Year Book, 1922":

  1. Allen & Henderson Packing Co. ... Rainier, Oregon
  2. Altoona Packing Co. ... Altoona, Washington
  3. Arthur Anderson Fish Co. ... Astoria, Oregon
  4. Bankers Discount Corp. ... Astorial, Oregon
  5. Barbey Packing Co. ... Hammond, Oregon
  6. Burke Fish Co. ... Portland, Oregon
  7. Booth Fisheries Co. ... Astoria, Oregon
  8. Chinook Packing Co. ... Chinook, Washington
  9. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Ellsworth, Washington
  10. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Eagle Cliff, Washington
  11. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Astoria, Oregon
  12. Columbia Salmon Canners, Inc. ... Astoria, Oregon
  13. Jeldness Bros. & Co. ... Point Ellis, Washington
  14. P.J. McGowan & Son ... Ilwaco, Washington
  15. P.J. McGowan & Son ... Warrendale, Oregon
  16. J.G. Megler & Co. ... Brookfield, Washington
  17. Pillar Rock Packing Co. ... Pillar Rock, Washington
  18. Point Adams Packing Co. ... Hammond, Oregon
  19. Sanborn Cutting Packing Co. ... Astoria, Oregon
  20. Seufert Bros. Co. ... The Dalles, Oregon
  21. Union Fisherman's Coop. Packing Co. ... Astoria, Oregon
  22. Warren Packing Co. ... Cathlamet, Washington
  23. Warrenton Clam Co. ... Warrenton, Oregon


1922 ... 9 shad canneries:
In 1922 the following list of "Pacific Coast Canned Shad Pack" appeared in "Pacific Fisherman: Year Book, 1922":

  1. Altoona Packing Co. ... Altoona, Washington
  2. Barbey Packing Co. ... Flavel, Oregon
  3. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Astoria, Oregon
  4. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Ellsworth, Washington
  5. Columbia River Packers Assn. ... Eagle Cliff, Washington
  6. P.J. McGowan & Sons, Inc. ... Ilwaco, Washington
  7. P.J. McGowan & Sons, Inc. ... Warrendale, Oregon
  8. Sanborn Cutting Co. ... Astoria, Oregon
  9. Warren Packing Co. ... Cathlamet, Washington


1966 ... U.S. National Historic Landmark, Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon:
The Samuel Elmore Cannery, constructed in 1898 at the foot of Flavel Street, was designated as a National Historic Landmark on November 13, 1966 as the longest continuously-operated salmon cannery in the United States. When the cannery closed in 1980 the owner and the City of Astoria sought to find a new use for the complex and to encourage its preservation. The cannery was in poor shape however. In 1990, the northwest corner of the building and its support pilings collapsed and in 1991 the buildings were slated for demolition. As the owner was dismantling the cannery as part of the demolition, it was destroyed by fire on January 26, 1993. The Landmark designation was withdrawn on August 11, 1993 and the property was removed from the National Register of Historic Places.

Today warehouses sit at the location of the former Elmore Cannery.


Image, 2015, Elmore Cannery location, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Astoria Warehousing", the location of what was once the Elmore Cannery, Astoria, Oregon. View from Oregon Highway 30 heading west. Image taken May 20, 2015.


1970 ... 5 canneries left:
By 1970 only 5 canneries were left on the Columbia River. The last major cannery on the Columbia, the Bumble Bee facility at Astoria, closed in 1980.


1973 ... White Star Cannery burns ... again:
Cannery destroyed

ASTORIA:

An abandoned fish cannery was destroyed and an oil storage area threatened by a waterfront fire Thursday before the blaze was contained. The Whte Star Cannery, empty since 1949, was a total loss.

It was built in 1899 and was scheduled for demolition to make way for a 146-unit condominium. An adjacent Union 76 oil storage area was threatened, but the fire was confined to the cannery."

Source:    "Eugene Register-Guard", Friday, July 13, 1973, located on "Google News" website, August 2013.


Image, 2013, White Star Cannery boiler, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
White Star Cannery boiler, Astoria, Oregon. The White Star Cannery burned in 1973. The boiler is all that remains. View from moving car. Image taken July 30, 2013.
Image, 2013, White Star Cannery boiler, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
White Star Cannery boiler, Astoria, Oregon. The White Star Cannery burned in 1973. The boiler is all that remains. Image taken September 4, 2013.


1980 ... Bumble Bee Seafoods, last Columbia River cannery closes:
The last major cannery on the Columbia, the Bumble Bee facility at Astoria, closed in 1980.

Image, 2013, Columbia River Packing Association, Bumble Bee brand, Astoria, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bumble Bee Seafoods, Columbia River Packers Association, Pier 39, Astoria, Oregon. Image taken July 30, 2013.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




Journey to the PacificReturn to
Menu
 



SNAKE RIVER CONFLUENCE | COLUMBIA PLATEAU
COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE | VANCOUVER PLAINS | JOURNEY TO THE PACIFIC
CAMPSITES


HOME | REGIONS | PENNY POSTCARDS | MY CORPS OF DISCOVERY
IMAGE INDEX | LINKS | ABOUT THIS SITE


COLUMBIA RIVER IMAGES - HOME
NORTHWEST JOURNEY - HOME
NORTHWEST BIRDING
RIDGEFIELD NWR - BIRDS
COMPLETE BIRD LIST - PHOTOS
THE BARLOW ROAD
THE COLUMBIA RIVER HIGHWAY
WILDFLOWERS and WEED BLOSSOMS



*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    (see individual locations for sources)    also:    Cobb, J.N., 1917, Pacific Salmon Fisheries, Appendix III to the Report of U.S. Commissioner of Fisheries for 1916, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries Document No.839;    Cobb, J.N., 1921, Pacific Salmon Fisheries, Appendix III to the Report of U.S. Commissioner of Fisheries for 1921, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries Document No.902;    Report of U.S. Commissioner of Fisheries for 1921;   : Pacific Fisherman: Year Book, 1922;    Smith, J.H., 2011, "Astoria, Images of America", Arcadia Publishing;    U.S. National Park Service website, 2013, National Historic Landmarks Program, Samuel Elmore Cannery;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
ColumbiaRiverImages.com/Regions/Places/canneries_columbia_river.html
© 2016, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
August 2016