Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"A View into the Fish Ladder"
Includes ... Bonneville Dam Fish Ladder ...
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"A view into the fish ladder", Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bonneville Dam's Washington side Fish Viewing Window. Image taken June 19, 2005.


Bonneville Dam Fish Ladders ...
The Bonneville Dam complex has two fish ladders and fish viewing windows, one on eash side of the Columbia River. Fish counting stations are set up on both ladders.

"A View into the Fish Ladder" ...
Images shot using a Sony Cybershot 7.2 megapixel digital camera, at the fish ladder at the North Powerhouse of Bonneville Dam. The water of August 27th was much clearer and ran faster. Use of a flash almost washed the image out. The water of June 19th was the "dirtiest" and both in June and May a flash was necessary for detail.

Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2006, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken July 2, 2006.


August 27, 2005 ...
The fish count for August 27, 2005, for the Washington fish ladder was: 1,663 Chinook salmon adults, 58 Chinook jacks, 1,621 Steelhead (total), 367 Steelhead (wild), 42 shad, 368 Coho adults, 32 Coho jacks, 0 Sockeye salmon, and 0 Lamprey.

Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Colored lines on fish are window reflection. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Red spot is flash reflection. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Red spot is flash reflection. Image taken August 27, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken August 27, 2005.


June 19, 2005 ...
The fish count for June 19, 2005, for the Washington fish ladder was: 1,103 Chinook salmon adults, 92 Chinook jacks, 221 Steelhead (total), 76 Steelhead (wild), 20,630 Shad, 1,850 Sockeye salmon, and 149 Lamprey.

Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. A lamprey is attached at the top. Smaller fish in shadow are shad. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon with Shad, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon with Shad, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon with Shad, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Two Sockeye, with Shad, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Shad, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Lamprey, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Stripes on right are reflections. Image taken June 19, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Shad and Lamprey, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Bright white spots are flash reflection. Image taken June 19, 2005.


May 13, 2005 ...
The fish count for May 13, 2005, for the Washington fish ladder was: 520 Chinook salmon adults, 84 Chinook jacks, 22 Steelhead (total), 4 Steelhead (wild), 784 Shad, 2 Sockeye salmon, 35 Lamprey, and 1 Coho salmon adult.

Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Salmon and Lamprey, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken May 13, 2005.
Image, 2005, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Wild Salmon, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken May 13, 2005.


July 2, 2006 ...

Image, 2006, Bonneville Dam Fish Window, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Lamprey, Bonneville Dam Fish Viewing Window. Image taken July 2, 2006.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Lewis, April 9, 1806 ...
This morning early we commenced the operation of reloading our canoes; at 7 A. M. we departed [from their camp at Shepperds Dell] and proceeded on to the Camp of Reubin and Joseph Fields [near Dodson, Oregon] they had not killed any game; we made no halt at this place but continued our rout to the Wah-clel-lah Village which is situated on the North side of the river [upstream of the location of today's Skamania and Skamania Landing, between Duncan and Woodward Creeks] about a mile below the beacon rock [Beacon Rock]; here we halted and took breakfast. ...     this village appears to be the winter station of the Wah-clel-lahs and Clahclellars, the greater part of the former have lately removed to the falls of the Multnomah, and the latter have established themselves a few miles above on the North side of the river opposite the lower point of brant island [Bradford Island], being the commencement of the rapids, here they also take their salmon; they are now in the act of removing, and not only take with them their furniture and effects but also the bark and most of the boards which formed their houses. 14 houses remain entire but are at this time but thinly inhabited, nine others appear to have been lately removed, and the traces of ten or twelve others of ancient date were to be seen in the rear of their present village. ...     on our way to this village we passed several beautifull cascades which fell from a great hight over the stupendious rocks which cloles the river on both sides nearly, except a small bottom on the South side in which our hunters were encamped. the most remarkable of these casscades falls about 300 feet perpendicularly over a solid rock into a narrow bottom of the river on the south side. it is a large creek, situated about 5 miles above our encampment of the last evening. several small streams fall from a much greater hight, and in their decent become a perfect mist which collecting on the rocks below again become visible and decend a second time in the same manner before they reach the base of the rocks. [Multnomah Falls area]     the hills have now become mountains high on each side are rocky steep and covered generally with fir and white cedar. ...     at 2 P. M. we renewed our voyage; passed under the beacon rock [Beacon Rock] on the north side, to the left of two small islands situated near the shore [Ives and Pierce Islands].     at four P.M. we arrived at the Clah-clel-lah village; here we found the natives busily engaged in erecting their new habitations, which appear to be reather of a temperary kind; it is most probable that they only reside here during the salmon season. we purchased two dogs of these people who like those of the village blow were but sulky and illy disposed; they are great rogues and we are obliged to keep them at a proper distance from our baggage. as we could not ascend the rapid [foot of the Cascade Rapids] by the North side of the river with our large canoes [Hamilton Island area], we passed to the oposite side and entered the narrow channel which seperates brant Island [Bradford Island] from the South shore; the evening being far spent and the wind high raining and very cold we thought best not to attempt the rapids [Cascade Rapids] this evening, we therefore sought a safe harbour in this narrow channel and encamped on the main shore [Tanner Creek, Oregon]. our small canoe with Drewyer and the two feildses was unable to pass the river with us in consequence of the waves they therefore toed her up along the N. side of the river and encamped [upstream end of Bonneville Dam, location of today's North Powerhouse] opposite the upper point of brant Island [Bradford Island]. after halting this evening I took a turn with my gun in order to kill a deer, but was unsuccessful. I saw much fresh sign. the fir has been lately injured by a fire near this place and many of them have discharged considerable quantities of rozin. we directed that Collins should hunt a few hours tomorrow morning and that Gibson and his crew should remain at his place untill we returned and employ themselves in collectng rozin which our canoes are now in want of.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:   See Bonneville Dam page for sources.

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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September 2008