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Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Alder Ridge, Washington"
Includes ... Alder Ridge ... Alder Creek ... Pine Creek ... Sixprong Creek ... Yakima Fold Belt ... Columbia River Basalt Group ...
Image, 2005, Union Pacific and Alder Ridge, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Union Pacific and Alder Ridge, Washington. View from Interstate 84, Oregon. Image taken September 24, 2005.


Alder Ridge ...
Alder Ridge stretches nearly 10 miles on the Washington bank of the Columbia River, with Alder Creek, Columbia River Mile (RM) 258.5, defining its eastern edge and Pine Creek, RM 250, defining its western end. On the ridge's north side winds Sixprong Creek. Alder Ridge is a part of the Yakima Fold Belt, a section of lava flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Lewis and Clark camped east of Alder Ridge in April 1806, on their journey back home.

Yakima Fold Belt ...
Alder Ridge is a part of the Yakima Fold Belt, a section of lava flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group.
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Lewis and Clark and Alder Ridge ...
Lewis and Clark traversed along the top of Alder Ridge in 1806 and spent the night of April 25, 1806, at the base of Alder Ridge, near the Washington community of Alderdale, between Alder Creek and Glade Creek.

"... the Country we passed through was Sandy indifferent rocky and hills on the left. proceeded up on the North Side the river hills are about 250 feet high & generally abrupt and Craggey in maney places faced with a pirpendicular and Solid rock. this rock is black and hard. leavel plains extend themselves from the top of the river hills to a great distance on either Side of the river. ..." [Clark, April 25, 1806]

"... encamped below the mouth of a Small Creek ..." [Clark, April 25, 1806]

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Views ...

Image, 2005, Alder Ridge, Washington, with Alder Creek, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Alder Ridge, Washington, with Alder Creek. Image taken May 24, 2005.
Image, 2005, Alder Creek and Alder Ridge, Washington, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Alder Creek and Alder Ridge, Washington. Image taken May 24, 2005.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 20, 1805 ...





Clark, April 25, 1806 ...
This morning we Collected our horses very conveniently [downstream of Roosevelt, Washington] and Set out at 9 A M and proceeded on to a village of Pish-quit-pahs of 52 mat Lodges 11 miles     this village Contains about 700 Soles here we turned out our horses and bought 5 dogs & some wood and dined here we met with a Chief and gave him a Medal of the Small Size [Jefferson Peace Medal]. we passed a house a little above the place we encamped on the 20th of Octr. 1805 [Roosevelt, Washington]. ...     at 4 P. M Set out. I <had not> was in the rear and had not proceeded verry far before one of the horses which we had hired of the Chopunnish, was taken from Hall who I had directed to ride. he had fallen behind out of my sight at the time. we proceeded on about 9 miles through a Country Similar to that of yesterday and encamped below the mouth of a Small Creek [Alder Creek] ...     we passed at 4 miles a Village of 5 Mat Lodges of the War-war-wa Tribe [Moulton states the Walla Walla Tribe]. We made a Chief and gave a metal to a Chief of each of those two tribes. great numbers of the nativs accompanied us to our encampmt. ...     the Winds which Set from mount hood [Mount Hood, Oregon, which is visible to the southwest in this area] or in a westwardly direction are much more cold than those from any other quarter. there are no dews in these plains, and from the appearance of the earth there appears to have been no rain for Several Weeks. ...     . we Continued our rout about 9 miles, where finding as maney Willows as would answer our purpose for fuel we encamped for the night [Alder Creek]. the Country we passed through was Sandy indifferent rocky and hills on the left. proceeded up on the North Side the river hills are about 250 feet high [Alder Ridge] & generally abrupt and Craggey in maney places faced with a pirpendicular and Solid rock. this rock is black and hard. leavel plains extend themselves from the top of the river hills to a great distance on either Side of the river. the Soil is not as fertile as about the falls tho it produces low grass on which the horses feed very Conveniently. it astonished me to See the order of their horses at this Season of the year when I know they had wintered on dry grass of the plains and at the Same time rode with greater Severity than is Common among ourselves. I did not See a Single horse which Could be deemed pore, and maney of them were verry fat. their horses are generally good. this evening after we had encamped we traded for two horses with nearly the Same articles we had offered at the Village. ...     I think those plains are much more Sandy than any which I have Seen and the road is a bed of loose Sand. made 20 miles





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
/Regions/Places/alder_ridge.html
June 2012