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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"The Columbia River Highway ... Dodson to Cascade Locks"
Includes ... Historic Columbia River Highway ... Crown Point Highway ... National Recreation Trail ... Roadhouses ... Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2006, Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Upstream side. Image taken September 16, 2006.


Historic Columbia River Highway ...

Follow the Highway ... (west to east)
  • Troutdale (Sandy River) to Crown Point...
  • Crown Point to the Dodson I-84 Interchange ...

  • Dodson to Cascade Locks ...
    • Dodson, Tumalt Creek, and Warrendale ...
    • Yeon State Park ...
    • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
    • Interstate 84 Interchange ...
    • McCord Creek ...
    • Moffett Creek ...
    • Moffett Creek to Tanner Creek, HCRH State Trail ...
    • Tanner Creek ...
    • Bonneville Dam (Interstate 84) ...
    • Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek, HCRH State Trail ...
    • Toothrock, HCRH State Trail ...
    • Toothrock Tunnel (Interstate 84) ...
    • Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks, HCRH State Trail ...
    • Eagle Creek ...
    • Eagle Creek Campgrounds and Overlook ...
    • Cascade Fish Hatchery ...
    • Ruckel Creek ...
    • Interstate 84 Underpass, HCRH State Trail ...
    • Bridge of the Gods ...
    • Cascade Locks ...

  • Cascade Locks to Hood River ...
  • Hood River to The Dalles ...


 
Dodson to Cascade Locks


Overview ...
Travel today:
Hikers and bicyclists can travel portions of the old road path as part of the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. The west trailhead begins at Yeon State Park and the east trailhead is under the Bridge of the Gods in Cascade Locks. Travelers in cars enter Interstate 84 at Yeon State Park and drive east. Interstate 84 follows sections of the old Highway route, the Toothrock Tunnel still exists, and other sections can be had from side trips at Bonneville Dam (Tanner Creek) and Eagle Creek. Eventually exit to the Cascade Locks exit and head into town, rejoining the old route as you go.


Dodson, Tumalt Creek, and Warrendale ...
The Oregon community of Dodson is located at Columbia River Mile 140, Tumalt Creek at MP 140, and Warrendale is located at Columbia River Mile 141.5.

[More Dodson]
[More Tumalt Creek]
[More Warrendale]

  • (HMP 36.7) ... Dodson (at abandoned gas station):

  • (HMP 36.2 - 38.3) ... Frontage Road:

    • "The Dodson Interchange markedly contrasts with the area to the west. The area opens up in view and the road is heavily influenced by its proximity to Interstate 84 immediately to the north. The original HCRH alignment alignment did not completely follow the current frontage road through the interchange area; there are other differences near Warrendale. The frontage road provides a transition zone, for those who use it, through a residential area with an open view through a small farm back south to the cliffs, including St. Peter's Dome. Several residences of mixed age and appearance are located south of the frontage road past the abandoned commercial buildings of the Dodson Community. This is an access road primarily to residences and to John Yeon State Park (McCord Creek and Elowah Falls)." [HCRH Master Plan 2005]

  • (HMP) ... Tumalt Creek:

  • HMP 37.5 and HMP 37.7 ... Masonry Culverts (1915):

    • "This masonry culvert, and another at HMP 37.7, consists of a reinforced concrete slab span with masonry retaining walls and floor." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "Three stone culverts exist within this section." [HCRH Master Plan 2005]

  • HMP 38.5 ... Warrendale:

Image, 2014, Dodson, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Abandoned Gas Station, Dodson, Oregon. Image taken June 9, 2014.
Image, 2015, Tumalt Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Tumalt Creek, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2016, Dodson, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Culvert along Frontage Road, on the old HCRH, Dodson, Oregon. South side. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Yeon State Park ...
John B. Yeon State Park stretches approximately from Columbia River Miles (RM) 141 to 145. The park was named for John Baptiste Yeon who came to Oregon in 1885. Yeon was a "rags to riches" story, beginning his Oregon career as a logger, and ending it as a prominant Portland citizen. He was among those who promoted the Historic Columbia River Highway. Cars travelling the HCRH merge back onto Interstate 84 at Yeon State Park. Hikers and bicyclists however can continue east along the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More Yeon State Park]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • (HMP 38.5) ... John B. Yeon State Park:

Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
John B. Yeon State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, Elwah Falls Trailhead, click to enlarge
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Trailhead, Elowah Falls, John B. Yeon State Park to Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ...
At Yeon State Park cars travelling the Historic Columbia River Highway can merge back onto Interstate 84. Hikers and bicyclists can continue east along the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More HCRH State Trail]

  • (HMP 38.5) ... Trailhead, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail:

Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Trailhead, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, John B. Yeon State Park to Cascade Locks, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail at John B. Yeon State Park. View looking east. Image taken June 9, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, looking west, McCord Creek to John B. Yeon State Park. Image taken June 9, 2014.


Interstate 84 Interchange ...
Cars travelling the Historic Columbia River Highway can merge back onto Interstate 84 at Yeon State Park while hikers and bicyclists can continue east along the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More Yeon State Park]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • (HMP 38.5) ... Yeon State Park interchange, return to Interstate 84:

Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Columbia River Highway junction with Interstate 84. Image taken June 5, 2014.


McCord Creek ...
McCord Creek enters the Columbia River at Columbia River Mile (RM) 143. The mouth of McCord Creek lies within the John B. Yeon State Park and can be reached on the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More McCord Creek]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 38.6 ... McCord Creek Bridge (1915):

    • "Reinforced concrete deck girder bridge, 365 feet in length, consisting of ten spans-- 5-54', 4-18', and one-23'. Destroyed about 1950." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • (HMP 38.6) ... McCord Creek Bridge (2012):

    • This new bridge over McCord Creek is now a part of the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
New McCord Creek Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 9, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
New McCord Creek Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 9, 2014.


Moffett Creek ...
The Moffett Creek Bridge was built in 1915 as part of the Columbia River Highway and was known as an engineering feat of the time. The 170-foot-long arch rises only 17 feet at the center. Today the bridge is a part of the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More Moffett Creek]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 39.8 ... Moffett Creek Bridge (1915):

    • "The reinforced concrete deck arch bridge is 205 feet in length. The width is 26 feet, including two 3-foot sidewalks and an 18-foot roadway. The low rise arch span, a three-hinge arch, has a clear span of 170 feet and rises only 17 feet in that distance. The hinges were of massive cast iron with 4 1/2 inch steel pins. ... The structure was known as an engineering feat. When it was constructed in 1915, it was the longest three-hinge, flat arch bridge in the United States. The bridge was bypassed in the late 1940s-early 1950s. Its replacement bridge was built in 1950 and is the westbound structure on Interstate 84." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Penny Postcard, Moffett Creek Bridge, Oregon, ca.1920, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Moffett Creek Bridge, Columbia River Highway, Oregon, ca.1920. Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Moffats Creek Bridge, Columbia River Highway.". Published by Pacific Novelty Co., San Francisco, California. Card #O-106. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2005, Moffett Creek from Hamilton Island, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Moffett Creek and bridges, Oregon, as seen from Hamilton Island, Washington. Image taken April 2, 2005.


Moffett Creek to Tanner Creek, HCRH State Trail ...
The Moffett Creek to Tanner Creek segment of the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail is 1.3 miles long and crosses the original Tanner Creek HCRH bridge.

[More Moffett Creek]
[More Tanner Creek]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • (HMP 39.8 - 41.1) ... Moffett Creek to Tanner Creek, HCRH State Trail:

Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Moffett Creek to Tanner Creek. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Tanner Creek ...
Tanner Creek, Oregon, merges with the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 144, just downstream of Bonneville and the Bonneville Dam. Since 1909 the waters of Tanner Creek, plus nine hatchery wells, have been used for the Bonneville Fish Hatchery to provide water for rearing fall chinook salmon, coho salmon, and summer and winter steelhead. Wahclella Falls, not quite a mile above the creek's mouth prevents fish passage beyond that point. Tanner Creek can be reached from the Bonneville Dam exit off of Interstate 84.

[More Tanner Creek]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 41.1 ... Tanner Creek Bridge (1915):

    • "The reinforced concrete deck girder bridge is 60 feet in length. The outside girders are elliptical shaped. The width is 23 feet with a 20-foot roadway. Part of the railing is missing. This bridge was bypassed in the late 1940s or early 1950s." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2014, Tanner Creek drainage, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Columbia River Highway bridge at Tanner Creek. View looking west. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Tanner Creek drainage, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Historic Columbia River Highway bridge at Tanner Creek. View looking west. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Bonneville Dam (Interstate 84) ...
The Bonneville Dam is a hydroelectric dam built across three islands - Robins, Bradford, and Cascade and began producing power in 1938. Once known as the "Cascade Rapids", this area was a major obstacle to navigation on the Columbia. The Rapids were a result of the Bonneville Landslide, a massive landslide which gave rise to the legend of the Bridge of the Gods. Bonneville Dam is located at Columbia River Mile 146 and can be reached from Interstate 84. Views of the Dam can be seen from the Toothrock section of the HCRH State Trail and the Eagle Creek Overlook.

[More Bonneville Dam]

  • HMP ... Bonneville Dam (1938):

Image, 2013, Bonneville Dam, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Entrance to Bonneville Dam from Interstate 84. The road from Interstate 84 into the Bonneville Dam complex passes under an arch of the Tanner Creek Viaduct. Image taken April 13, 2013.


Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek, HCRH State Trail ...
[More Tanner Creek]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 41.3 ... Toothrock Trailhead, HCRH State Trail (1996):

    • "This trailhead near Tanner Creek provides parking for visitors accessing the Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek section of the HCRH State Trail. It is not an original feature of the highway." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 41.7 to 42.8 ... Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek, HCRH State Trail (1996):

    • "In 1996, ODOT reopened the CRH segment between Tanner Creek and Eagle Creek (between HMP 41.7 and 42.8) for non-motorized use as part of the HCRH State Trail. The rehabilitated segment includes the Toothrock and Eagle Creek viaducts." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Toothrock Trailhead sign, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Toothrock, HCRH State Trail ...
[More Toothrock]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 42.2 ... Eagle's Nest (Pedestrian Alcove) (1996):

    • "This basalt masonry pedestrian alcove, with concrete cap, approximates and overlook that was built as part of the CRH's original construction. However, it is not an exact replica of the original structure, which was destroyed in the mid-1930s during construction of a section of the water-level route that eventually replaced the CRH as the trunk route through the Gorge." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 42.2 ... Toothrock and Eagle Creek Viaducts (1914, 1915):

    • "Located above the Toothrock Tunnel, these reinforced concrete deck girder viaducts curve around the mountain, are 23 feet wide with a 20-foot roadway, and are about 224 feet long in total length. ... The viaducts were abandoned when the Toothrock Tunnel was completed in 1936." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

    • "High above the river, Toothrock and Eagle Creek Viaducts (HAER No.OR-36-N) (224') carried the highway around Toothrock, a tall basalt cliff, high above the river before dropping down to Eagle Creek. Their designs differ only in their railing treatment, where Toothrock Viaduct uses a concrete spindle and cap design, Eagle Creek Viaduct uses a masonry rail and concrete cap design. Their purpose was to minimize costs but create sound structures with an aesthetic component. Completed in 1915, they were abandoned in 1937 at the completion of Toothrock Tunnel and a new water-level realignment of the trunk route near Bonneville Dam." [HAER No. OR-36-C report, 1996]

  • HMP 42.2 ... Toothrock Tunnel Bridge (1996):

    • "This pre-cast concrete bridge provides pedestrian access across a portion of the Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek section of the HCRH State Trail. It replaces an original segment of the CRH that was lost during construction of the Toothrock Tunnel in 1937." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
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HCRH State Trail near Toothrock, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
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"Eagle's Nest", Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail near Tooth Rock. View looking northeast. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
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Toothrock Tunnel Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Toothrock Tunnel Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Toothrock Tunnel (Interstate 84) ...
[More Toothrock Tunnel]

  • HMP 42.2 ... Toothrock Tunnel (1936, 1937):

    • "This two-lane 827-foot tunnel was bored through Tooth Rock as part of the Bonneville Dam construction project. It originally provided a 26-foot roadway and 4-foot sidewalks. Maximum clearance was 20 feet The CRH was realigned from Tanner Creek to Cascade Locks because the dam's backwaters would flood the adjacent Union Pacific main track. Realigning the rail line meant rerouting the highway through this section. Toothrock Tunnel's construction rrepresents the next generation in tunnel design in the Columbia Gorge and takes a nod both to modern technology and scenic preservation. ... In 1969, the tunnel was deepened three feet to add vertical clearance. In addition, the sidewalks were cut back to widen travel lanes. ..." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The survey for this replacement alignment of the old Columbia River Highway was made in 1933 and 1934. The Toothrock Tunnel is concrete-lined, 837 feet long, with two four-foot sidewalks. The width is 23 feet, and the vertical clearance is 16 feet. The tunnel was built in conjunction with changes created by the Bonneville Dam, completed in 1937 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2010, Toothrock Tunnel, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Toothrock Tunnel, Bonneville, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from front window of moving car. Image taken March 6, 2010.


Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks, HCRH State Trail ...
[More Eagle Creek]
[More Cascade Locks]
[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 42.7 - 45.8 ... Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks, HCRH State Trail:

      "In 1999, the FHWA's Western Federal Lands Highway Division completed rehabilitation of the 2.4-mile Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks section of the Columbia River Highway for non-motorized use. Within a quarter mile east of the Eagle Creek Campground, the hgihway's alignment headed south, away from the river. At HMP 43.6, it crosses Ruckel Creek on a masonry-walled 10-foot slab span constructed in 1917.

      A short section east of Ruckel Creek Bridge, the highway takes an 800-foot detour route dating from 1937. It rejoins the original alignment below the south shoulder of present-day Interstate 84. As part of the 1999 FHWA project, a pedestrian tunnel was constructed under the Interstate 84 alignment. North of the four-lane highway, the HCRH State Trail follows a new alignment eastward for 2,000 feet before continuing on the original CRH roadbed to the Bridge of the Gods, in Cascade Locks, at HMP 45.8." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]



Eagle Creek ...
Eagle Creek is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 150, at the upstream end of the Bonneville Dam. Eagle Creek was the location of the first U.S. Forest Service Campground, established in 1916. Today Eagle Creek is one of the most popular hikes in the Columbia Gorge. Located on the right bank of Eagle Creek is the Eagle Creek Fish Hatchery. The bridge crossing Eagle Creek was once part of the Historic Columbia River Highway (HCRH), and is now part of the off-ramp from Interstate 84. The concrete-arch bridge is the only HCRH bridge faced with stone.

[More Eagle Creek]

  • HMP 42.5 ... Eagle Creek Park Stairway (1996):

    • "This concrete stairway provides pedestrian access from the eastern end of the Tanner Creek to Eagle Creek section of the HCRH State Trail to the Eagle Creek Bridge and the Eagle Creek Recreation Area. It replaces a section of roadway lost during construction of the Toothrock Tunnel in 1937." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Pedestrian Overlook near Eagle Creek Bridge (1915):

    • "This masonry pedestrian alcove at the northwest corner of the Eagle Creek Bridge provides seating areas and a point of view for observing salmon runs in the nearby stream." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Bridge (1915):

    • "This 100-foot reinforced-concrete structure includes a 60-foot open-spandrel deck arch with a basalt rubble veneer. Width is about 23 feet, with a 20-foot roadway." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The reinforced concrete deck arch is 100 feet in length. The semi-circular arch has three rib arches and is 60 feet in length. At the ends of the arch are 20-foot concrete slab spans. The bridge is faced with native stone. A pedestrian overlook is at the west end. ... The bridge serves as an eastbound exit from Interstate 84." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Masonry Walls and Walkways (1936):

Image, 2014, Eagle Creek Staircase, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Eagle Creek Staircase, Historical Columbia River Highway State Trail, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken from moving car on Interstate 84. Image taken June 9, 2014.
Image, 2006, Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
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Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Upstream side. Image taken September 16, 2006.
Image, 2006, Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
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Sitting area, Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Image taken September 16, 2006.


Eagle Creek Campgrounds and Overlook ...

[More Eagle Creek]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Campground and Picnic Area (1915/1936):

    • "The Eagle Creek Campground (1915) is considered the first Forest Service campground in the United States. ... The campground was expanded and a picnic area developed in 1936-37 with the asistance of the Civilian Conservation Corps. The facility contains stone walls, fireplaces, and restrooms and shelters in the "rustic style" of the CCC period. ... The campground and picnic area is located south of the old Columbia River Highway route." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Public Comfort Station ("Big John"), Registry Booth, and Community Kitchen (1936):

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Overlook (1936/1937):

    • "This building includes an enclosed dining room, with fireplace, and restrooms." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The overlook park is located on a bluff north of the Eagle Creek Campground and Picnic Area, between the Bonneville Dam Pool and the westbound lanes of Interstate 84. The facility was developed in 1937 by the ivilian Conservation Corps to handle the increased number of sightseers who were attracted to the Eagle Creek Recreation Area or wished to view the construction of Bonneville Dam (1933-37), the first federal dam on the Columbia River. ... A stone retaining wall runs along the north perimeter of the park, and a "rustic system" community kitchen and restroom building overlooks the river. The overlook park contains a short extant portion of the old Columbia River Highway." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Picnic Area (1937):

  • HMP 42.7 ... Eagle Creek Recreation Area (Eagle Creek Campground and Eagle Creek Overlook Picnic Area):

    • "In 1915, the Oregon National Forest (by 1924 the Mount Hood National Forest) established the first improved forest campground in the United States near Eagle Creek, south and east of the CRH, as the Eagle Creek Forest Camp. It included day-use picnic facilities, good water, and sanitary conveniences. By the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) had greatly enlarged the Eagle Creek Campground, constructing several major buildings. From 1915 to 1937, a privately owned campground northeast of the bridge rented cabins with attached garages. A two-story lodge offered home cooking, fishing supplies, and groceries. The Cascade Salmon Hatchery was constructed on this site in the 1950s. A suspension bridge constructed over Eagle Creek in 1936 to provide access to the Eagle Creek Trail was destroyed in a winter storm in 1996.

    • The Eagle Creek Campground is east of Eagle Creek and south of the original CRH alignment at this location. All structures there date from the CCC era and include a Community Kitchen, a Public Comfort Station, and a Registry Booth generally located along a campground loop road. Low stone walls line the road. Stoves, ater fountains, tables, and stairways are all part of the CCC construction at the campground. ... [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • The Eagle Creek Overlook is north of the Eagle Creek Campground. It is located on a point high above the Columbia River and north of Interstate 84. This area provides a group camping or picnicking and originally offered premium views of Bonneville Dam's construction. The Eagle Creek Overlook Building provides shelter for group picnics. A masonry retaining wall runs the length of the bluff in front of the building." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP ... Suspension Bridge, Eagle Creek Campground (1936):

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Eagle Creek Overlook, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.
Image, 2015, Eagle Creek Overlook, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Picnic area gate, Eagle Creek Overlook, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2009, Eagle Creek Overlook, click to enlarge
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Eagle Creek Overlook Shelter, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken June 3, 2009.
Image, 2009, Eagle Creek Overlook, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Eagle Creek Overlook Shelter, Eagle Creek, Oregon. Image taken June 3, 2009.


Cascade Fish Hatchery ...
The Cascade Fish Hatchery located on 3.8 acres on the right bank of Eagle Creek. It was built in 1959 as part of the Mitchell Act. The hatchery uses the waters of Eagle Creek for egg incubation and the rearing of Coho Salmon. The location of the Cascade Fish Hatchery was once the location of a privately-owned campground with cabins, garages, and a two-story lodge.

[More Cascade Fish Hatchery]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • (HMP 42.7) ... Cascade Fish Hatchery:

Image, 2006, Cascade Fish Hatchery from Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Cascade Fish Hatchery from Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Image taken September 16, 2006.


Ruckel Creek ...
Ruckel Creek is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 147, upstream of Bonneville Dam. Downstream is Eagle Creek and Tanner Creek while upstream is the Oregon community of Cascade Locks. Ruckel Creek and the HCRH Ruckel Creek Bridge can be reached along the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail.

[More Ruckel Creek]

  • HMP 43.6 ... Ruckel Creek:

  • HMP 43.6 ... Ruckel Creek Bridge (1917, 1999):

    • "The small concrete slab span bridge is 10 feet in length, with concrete abutments faced with stone. ... The bridge is part of a Forest Service trail, accessible from the Eagle Creek Campground." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

    • "This modest reinforced-concrete slab span carries the CRH over Ruckel Creek. A four-arch masonry guard wall on the span's north shoulder had partially collapsed since the structure was abandoned in the late 1930s. The FHWA rebuilt the wall in 1999." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]


Interstate 84 Underpass, HCRH State Trail ...
The Interstate 84 Underpass takes the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail under Interstate 84. It opened in 1999, allowing hikers and bicyclists a route into Cascade Locks.

[More HCRH State Trail]

  • HMP 44.4 ... Interstate 84 Underpass, HCRH State Trail (1999):

    • "This 145-foot pre-cast concrete underpass tunnel includes portals faced in basalt. Its construction made continuous again the portion of the CRH from Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks. The 1930s highway realignment between Bonneville and Cascade Locks (later Interstate 84) had bisected this portion of the CRH. The FHWA--Western Federal Lands Highway Division headed up rehabilitation of the CRH between Eagle Creek and Cascade Locks as part of the HCRH State Trail, including construction of this underpass." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]


Bridge of the Gods ...
The Bridge of the Gods is located at Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 148, nearly three miles upstream of Bonneville Dam, and just downstream of the historic canal and locks at Cascade Locks. The bridge was built in 1926 and then raised in 1938 to accommodate the rising pool behind the Bonneville Dam. Currently the Bridge of the Gods is a toll bridge allowing motor and foot traffic, and it is the Columbia River crossing for the Pacific Crest Trail.

[More Bridge of the Gods]
[More Pacific Crest Trail]

  • (HMP 45.8) ... Bridge of the Gods (1926, 1938):

    • The Bridge of the Gods is a cantilever bridge with a total length of 1,858 feet. It is 35 feet wide with two 12-foot-wide lanes. [Port of Cascade Locks website, 2015]

  • HMP 45.8 ... Cascade Locks Trailhead, HCRH State Trail (1999):

    • "This trailhead under the south approach to the Bridge of the Gods provides parking for visitors accessing the Eagle Creek to Cascade Locks section of the HCRH State Trail. It is not an original feature of the highway." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Approaching Cascade Locks, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from west of Bridge of the Gods. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2014, John B. Yeon State Park, click to enlarge
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Trailhead, Cascade Locks, Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, Oregon. Image taken June 9, 2014.
Image, 2004, Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Bridge of the Gods, Cascade Locks. From the Oregon side, looking across the Columbia River at the toe of the Table Mountain Landslide. Image taken October 27, 2004.


Cascade Locks ...
[More Cascade Locks]

Image, 2010, Cascade Locks, Oregon, click to enlarge
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The town of Cascade Locks, as seen from the Bridge of the Gods, Oregon. View from moving car heading north across Bridge of the Gods. Image taken March 6, 2010.
Image, 2011, Looking upstream from Bridge of the Gods, click to enlarge
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Cascade Locks as seen from Bridge of the Gods. Image taken May 20, 2011.


Follow the Highway:


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    SEE: Columbia River Highway Route;    AND: Historic Columbia River Highway sources;

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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Images are NOT to be downloaded from this website.
February 2016