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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"The Columbia River Highway ... Crown Point to the Dodson I-84 Interchange"
Includes ... Historic Columbia River Highway ... Crown Point Highway ... National Recreation Trail ... Roadhouses ... Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail ... National Register of Historic Places ...
Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge at Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 22, 2009.


Historic Columbia River Highway ...

Follow the Highway ... (west to east)
  • Troutdale (Sandy River) to Crown Point...

  • Crown Point to the Dodson I-84 Interchange ...
    • Overview ...
    • Crown Point ...
    • Crown Point Chalet ...
    • Vista House ...
    • Crown Point Viaduct ...
    • Crown Point Figure-Eight Loops ...
    • Milepost Marker 25 ...
    • Guard Rocks ...
    • Milepost Marker 26 ...
    • Talbot Foot Bridge ...
    • Latourell Falls ...
    • Guy W. Talbot State Park ...
    • Latourell Falls Chalet and Maffett's Villa ...
    • Milepost Marker 27 ...
    • Shepperd's Dell ...
    • Bishops Cap ...
    • Box Culvert ...
    • Cattle Pass to the Luscher Barn ...
    • Forest Hall ...
    • Bridal Veil Falls, Viewpoint, and Lodge ...
    • Pillars of Hercules ...
    • Bridal Veil Bridge ...
    • Bridal Veil Community ...
    • Palmer Mill Road ...
    • Milepost Marker 29 ...
    • Intersection with East Bridal Veil Road ... Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead, return to Interstate 84, continuation of the HCRH ...
    • Bridal Veil Lumbering Company ...
    • Coopey Falls ...
    • Views along the Highway ...
    • Milepost Marker 30 ...
    • Forest Service Masonry Sign Post ...
    • Benson State Recreation Area ...
    • Mist Falls ...
    • Multnomah Lodge ("Mist Lodge") ...
    • Approach to Wahkeena Falls ...
    • Wahkeena Creek Bridge ...
    • Wahkeena Falls ...
    • West Multnomah Falls Viaduct ...
    • Multnomah Falls and Lodge ...
    • East Multnomah Falls Viaduct ...
    • Bridge West of Oneonta Gorge Creek ...
    • Oneonta ...
    • Oneonta Tunnel ...
    • Horsetail Falls ...
    • Milepost Marker 35 ...
    • Ainsworth State Park ...
    • Masonry Drinking Fountain ...
    • Interstate 84 Interchange ...

  • Dodson to Cascade Locks ...
  • Cascade Locks to Hood River ...
  • Hood River to The Dalles ...


 
Crown Point to the Dodson I-84 Interchange


Overview ...
(to come)


Crown Point ...
Crown Point is a large lava flow feature on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 129, with Rooster Rock being 733 feet below and Rooster Rock State Park stetching upstream.

[More Crown Point]

Penny Postcard, Crown Point and NO Vista House, Oregon, ca.1916
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Penny Postcard: Crown Point before Vista House, Oregon, ca.1916.
Penny Postcard, ca.1916, "Crown Point and Rooster Rock. Along Columbia River Highway, Oregon." Published by the Oregon News Company. Card #O-16. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Aerial view, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, with Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Vista House - Crown Point 'On the Columbia River Highway'." Building on the right is the "Crown Point Chalet", which was built in 1915 and closed in 1927. The building was demolished in the 1950s. Photo by A.M. Prentiss. Published by The Rose City News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #7. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Crown Point Chalet ...
Off to the right as one approaches Vista House is a small gravel road, once the drive to the Crown Point Chalet. The Crown Point Chalet was built in 1915 by Mrs. Margaret Henderson, who was also a part of the history of Chanticleer Inn and the short-lived Latourell Falls Chalet. The Crown Point Chalet was located on the south side of Crown Point, on a bluff overlooking Vista House and the point. Crown Point Chalet closed in 1927 with the declining health of Mrs. Henderson. The building was demolished in the 1950s.

[More Crown Point]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • (HMP 23.8)... Crown Point Chalet (1915):

Penny Postcard, Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920
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Penny Postcard: Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Mrs. Henderson's Chalet, Crown Point." Photo copyright Cross & Dimmitt. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2013, Crown Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Road to Crown Point Chalet, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Vista House ...
Vista House was built in 1918 as a rest stop along the highway. It was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

[More Vista House]

  • HMP 23.9 ... Vista House (1918):

      "This octagonal building was constructed of reinforced concrete covered with a sandstone masonry veneer. Much of the interior is covered in Alaskan marble. The building was designed as a public comfort station and memorial to Oregon pioneers. A noteworthy example of architecture influenced by the Jugendstil, or German new art movement, the design includes a visitor gallery, a roof top balcony, and basement rest rooms. It was isted in the National Register in 1974." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

      "The Vista House was designed by Portland architect, Edgar Lazarus, in a style closely related to the German Junendstill. The small reinforced concrete building was constructed in 1916-18, as an observatory and rest stop. It was dedicated in May 1918 to early Oregon pioneers. Samuel C. Lancaster conceived of the idea of an observation building at Crown Point. Crown Point was one of the two sites used for dedication of the Columbia River Highway on June 6, 1916. Vista House is listed in the National Register and has also been recorded for the Historic American Buildings Survey." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]


Penny Postcard, Vista House Dedication, May 5, 1918
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Penny Postcard: Vista House Dedication, May 5, 1918.
Penny Postcard, May 5, 1918, "Vista House, Columbia River Highway, Oregon." Published by The Oregon News, Portland, Oregon. Card #17. Caption on back reads: "Vista House, Columbia River Highway, Ore., Erected in 1917 at a cost of over $100,000. Finished on the inside with marble. Used for an Observatory and Comfort station. From this point one gets a beautiful view of the Columbia River for 25 to 40 miles.". The dedication of Vista House was May 5, 1918. Portland's Royal Rosarians can be seen dressed in white. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Crown Point and Vista House, Oregon, ca.1943
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Penny Postcard: Vista House, Crown Point, Oregon, ca.1943.
Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1943, "Vista House, Columbia River Highway, Oregon." The Crown Point Chalet is visible in the background on the right above Vista House. Image copyright Angelus Studio. Published by Wesley Andrews Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #859. Card is postmarked August 18, 1943. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2005, Vista House and Crown Point, click to enlarge
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Vista House at Crown Point. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2004, Vista House, 1917, click to enlarge
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Vista House, 1917, lower entrance, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Automobiles once dropped ladies off at this lower entrance in order to visit the lounge on the lower level of Vista House. Image taken October 11, 2004.
Image, 2004, Vista House window detail, click to enlarge
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Window detail, Vista House, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2006, Inside Vista House, click to enlarge
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Inside Vista House. Image taken October 21, 2006.


Crown Point Viaduct ...
[More Crown Point]

  • HMP 23.9 ... Crown Point Viaduct (1914):

    • "This 560-foot spiral viaduct was constructed of reinforced concrete and runs for 225 degrees of a circle around Crown Point. It functions as a 7-foot-wide sidewalk and curb with a 4-foot-high parapet wall on the outside of a 24-foot roadway cut into the rock formation. A dry masonry retaining wall stabilizes the hillside above and below the viaduct and masonry parapet walls that ring Vista House, the sandstone public comfort station completed on top of Crown Point in 1918." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

      "The viaduct is located at the top of Crown Point, a promontory of Columbia River basalt projecting from the south wall of the Columbia Gorge. Crown Point rises nearly vertically 625 feet above the river. The viaduct is 560 feet long and consists of 28 20-foot reinforced concrete slab spans. The structure curves around Vista House on Crown Point. The viaduct was the first structure built on the Multnomah County portion of the Columbia River Highway, under the supervision and design of Samuel . Lancaster." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]


Image, 2004, Crown Point and Vista House, click to enlarge
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Crown Point and Vista House viaduct, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken October 11, 2004.
Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Crown Point Viaduct, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2004, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Crown Point. Image taken October 11, 2004.


Crown Point Figure-Eight Loops ...
[More Crown Point Loops]

  • HMP 24 - 26 ... Crown Point Figure-Eight Loops (1913, 1914):

    • "This CRH section is called the "Figure-Eight Loops" because it curves back on itself four times within 40 acres as it makes a 600-foot descent between Crown Point and Latourell Falls. Here, its designer, Lancaster, "developed distance" to maintain a grade of 5 percent or less and a minimum 100-foot turning radius. The Figure-Eight Loops were constructed with an elaborate system of concrete curbs, gutters, and drop inlet, along with tiled drains and culverts, to keep water from standing on the pavement and causing road deterioration and safety hazards." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2004, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway on the east side of the Crown Point viaduct, heading into the Crown Point Loops. View east, Columbia River Gorge. Image taken June 27, 2004.
Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Crown Point Figure-eight Loops, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Milepost Marker 25 ...
Historic Milepost Marker 25 is located along one of the outside curves of the Crown Point Figure-Eight loops.

  • HMP 25 ... Milepost Marker 25:

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Milepost Marker 25, along the Crown Point Loops, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Guard Rocks ...

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Guard Rocks before Latourell, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Milepost Marker 26 ...
Historic Milepost Marker 26 is located just before reaching the Latourell Falls/Talbot State Park area.

[More Latourell Falls]
[More Guy W. Talbot State Park]

  • HMP 26 ... Milepost Marker 26:

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Milepost Marker 26, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Talbot Foot Bridge ...
[More Guy W. Talbot State Park]

  • (HMP 26) ... Talbot Footbridge:

Penny Postcard, Latourell Foot Bridge across Highway, ca.1920
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Penny Postcard: Foot Bridge across Columbia River Highway, at Latourelle Falls, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Foot Bridge Over Highway Near Latourelle Falls.". Caption on back reads: "Artistic Foot Bridge. Over the Columbia River Highway near Latourelle Falls connecting the two parts of a country estate through which the right of way of the Highway runs. Care has been taken in this, as in all other matters connected with the highway, to preserve artistic walues.". Image copyright Weister Co. Published by Chas. S. Lipschuetz Company, Portland, Oregon. Card #358. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2014, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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North support, Talbot footbridge, Guy W. Talbot State Park, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken June 30, 2014.


Latourell Falls ...
Latourell Falls plunges 249 feet, and is located in Oregon's Guy W. Talbot State Park. The falls is on Latourell Creek and was named after Joseph Latourell, a prominent Columbia River Gorge settler.

[More Latourell Falls]

  • HMP 26.1 ... Latourell Creek Bridge (1914):

    • "This bridge consists of three 80-foot reinforced-concrete braced-spandrel deck arches. Total length, including approaches, is 316 feet. It has a 17-foot-wide road deck and 3-foot sidewalks. Cap-and-spindle railings here represent a member of the family of railing types found on CRH structures." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

      "The structure is a three-span reinforced concrete deck arch, each rib arch being 80 feet. The total length is 316 feet including approaches. ...   The bridge is located in Guy W. Talbot State Park and was designed to obtain the best view of Latourell Falls, south of the bridge." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 26.1 ... Masonry Retaining Walls, Trails, and Falls Overlook (1914):

    • "Masonry retaining walls similar to those seen along the CRH mark the borders of trails leading to Latourell Falls from the historic highway." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2013, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Latourell Falls, Oregon, as seen from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 22, 2009.
Image, 2009, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge at Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 22, 2009.


Guy W. Talbot State Park ...
Guy Webster Talbot and his family used the area of Latourell Falls as a summer estate until early 1929 when they donated 220 acres to the state of Oregon. Today, this property is the Guy W. Talbot State Park, a beautiful picnic park with a modern picnic shelter, a gently sloping grassy hill dotted with Port Orford cedars, Douglas firs, alders and maples, and a trailhead underneath the Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge to Latourell Falls.

[More Guy W. Talbot State Park]

  • HMP 26.1 ... Guy W. Talbot State Park (created 1929):

    • "The park is located on both sides of the Columbia River Highway, approximately five miles west of Bridal Veil. A gift of 125 acres from Guy W. and Geraldine W. Talbot on March 29, 1929, was the beginning of the park. This parcel of land has the distinction of being the first tract in Multnomah County to be obtained for a state park. ... The park includes Latourell Falls (249-foot drop)." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 26.1 ... Guy W. Talbot State Park Plaque (1939):

    • "The large bronze plaque was erected on the north side of the CRH." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Images, 2013, Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell Falls, Oregon, looking east. Image taken March 3, 2013.


This park sign is located on the east side of the Latourell Bridge.
Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Guy Webster Talbot bronze plaque, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


This bronze plaque to Guy Webster Talbot is located on the west side of the Latourell Bridge, at the head of the trail leading down to the lower half of the Park.


Latourell Falls Chalet and Maffett's Villa ...
Two early roadhouses along the Historic Columbia River Highway.

[More Latourell Roadhouses]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • (HMP 26.1) ... Latourell Falls Chalet (1914):

  • (HMP 26.1) ... Maffett's Villa (1915):

Images, 2013, Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell Falls, Oregon, looking east. Image taken March 3, 2013.

Maffett's Villa was located on the left in this image and the Falls Chalet was located on the hill on the right in this image. Today this area is part of the Guy W. Talbot State Park.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Roadhouse information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Latourell Falls Chalet on information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Maffett's Villa ("Falls Villa") on information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Milepost Marker 27 ...

[More Shepperd's Dell]

  • HMP 27 ... Milepost Marker 27:

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Milepost Marker 27, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Shepperd's Dell ...
The Shepperd's Dell Bridge is a graceful reinforced concrete deck arch with a main arch span of 100 feet and consists of two parabolic arch ribs with open spandrels. The bridge was designed by K.R. Billner under the supervison of Samuel C. Lancaster. The structure was constructed by the Pacific Bridge Company, Portland, at a cost of $10,800. A stairwell and trail to the Shepperd's Dell Falls is at the east end of the bridge. Shepperd's Dell Bridge is located in Shepperd's Dell State Natural Area. The land was donated as parkland by the owner, George Shepperd, a local farmer in memory of his wife.

[More Shepperd's Dell]

  • HMP 27.4 ... Shepperd's Dell Bridge (1914):

    • "This bridge consists of a single 100-foot, open spandrel, reinforced-concrete ribbed deck arch. Total length with approaches is 150 feet. It has a 17-foot-wide roadway, two sidewalks, and spindle-and-cap railings. A staircase at the eastern end leads down to a masonry-walled pedestrian trail that takes visitors to the stream. A bronze plaque on the southeast masonry railing end post." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

      "The one-span reinforced concrete deck arch has a main arch span of 100 feet which consists of two parabolic arch ribs with open spandrels. The total length is 150 feet. ... It is in Shepperd's Dell State Park, and the falls is south of the bridge. A stairwell and trail to the falls originates at the east end of the bridge." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 27.4 ... Concrete Staircase, and Masonry Guard Wall on Paved Trail to Youngs Creek (1914):

    • "From the Shepperd's Dell Bridge's souteast corner, a short reinforced-concrete staircase leads to a narrow pedestrian trail leading around the face of an alcove to Young Creek. A concrete-capped masonry guard wall flanks the path, and a small viewing platform near the stream marks its endpoint." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 27.4 ... Shepperd's Dell State Park (created 1915):

    • "The first area obtained for this park was 10.03 acres, given to the city of Portland by George G. Shepperd on May 6, 1915, as a memorial to his wife." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Penny Postcard, Shepperds Dell Highway, ca.1920 Shepperd's Dell Highway, Oregon. Penny Postcard, ca.1920, Shepperd's Dell Highway. Caption along the bottom reads "305. Shepperd's Dell, Columbia River Highway, Oregon". #305, Chas. S. Lipschuetz Co., Portland, Oregon In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2005, Shepperd's Dell Bridge, click to enlarge
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Shepperd's Dell Bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2005, Youngs Creek Falls, click to enlarge
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Gene and Riley, Young Creek Falls. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Bishops Cap ...
Bishops Cap is a once-spectacular basalt feature on the upstream side of the Shepperds Dell Bridge. Workers on the Columbia River Highway created a "half-tunnel" through the basalt to get around this feature.

[More Bishop's Cap]

  • (HMP 27.5) ... Bishop's Cap:

    • "Just beyond the [Shepperds Dell] bridge, Italian stonemasons constructed a retaining wall to hold the fill for the highway, which circumvented Bishop's Cap. The lower portion of the rock was carved away to form a "half-tunnel", which provided clearance needed for vehicular traffic." [Mershon, C.E., 2006, The Columbia River Highway]

Penny Postcard, Bishops Cap, Shepperds Dell Highway, ca.1920 Bishops Cap, Shepperd's Dell Highway, ca.1920 Penny Postcard, ca.1920, Bishops Cap and Shepperd's Dell Highway. Caption along the top reads "Scene at Shepperd's Dell, Columbia River Highway, Ore.". Sand Island and the Columbia River are in the background. Published by The Oregon News Co., Portland, Oregon In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2013, Bishops Cap from Shepperd's Dell, click to enlarge
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Bishops Cap from Shepperd's Dell, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Box Culvert ...
Immediately east of Shepperd's Dell and Bishop's Cap is a "box culvert" was built to take a small stream under the highway. An early photograph in Mershon's publication "The Historic Columbia River Highway" shows the culvert soon after completion, with guard rocks at its top, lining the side of the highway. In 1995 a stone wall barrier, in "historic style" was built around the culvert.

[More Shepperd's Dell]

  • HMP 27.5 ... Masonry Culvert (1914):

    • "This culvert consists of a single 8-foot reinforced-concrete deck slab span with masonry walls and floor". [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 27.5 ... Masonry Culvert Barrier (1995):

    • "This three-sided basalt masonry structure is just east of Shepperd's Dell Bridge. It is of the slip-for grout-lock design with concrete caps and end posts. Its style blends well with the architectural elements of other structures associated with the CRH. The barrier prevents pedestrians and bicyclists from falling into a deep masonry culvert that diverts runoff under the roadway." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Images, 2015, Culvert, Shepperd's Dell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Box Culvert near Shepperd's Dell, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Images, 2015, Culvert, Shepperd's Dell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Box Culvert near Shepperd's Dell, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Bishop's Cap is visible in the background. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Cattle Pass to the Luscher Barn ...
The Lusher family agreed to let the Columbia River Highway pass through their property as long as the cows could get from one pasture to another. A cattle pass under the highway was built.

[More Luscher Farm]

  • HMP 27.8 ... Cattle Pass (1914):

    • "This culvert consists of a single 8-foot reinforced-concrete deck slab span. The underpass also has concrete walls and floor. A local landowner required construction of this Cattle Pass so that his herd could migrate to both sides of a pasture bisected by the highway's construction." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • (HMP 27.8) ... Lusher Barn (1895):

    • "He [Fred Luscher] was born up here, on the family's steep-side dairy farm, in 1895; ... He points out the barn, built the year he was born, but explains that the old house is gone, its three stories considered too old." [Interview with Fred Luscher, "The Oregonian", January 21, 1980]

Images, 2015, Cattle Pass, Luscher Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cattle Pass to the Luscher Barn, looking west, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken April 10, 2015.
Images, 2015, Cattle Pass, Luscher Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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South entrance, Cattle Pass to the Luscher Barn, looking west, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken April 10, 2015.
Images, 2015, Cattle Pass, Luscher Farm, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Path, Cattle Pass to the Luscher Barn, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken April 10, 2015.


Forest Hall ...
Forest Hall, also known as "Maxwell House", was built in 1915 and was one of the many roadhouses along the Columbia River Highway. Forest Hall is located 1/4 mile east of Shepherd's Dell. Today it is a private residence.

[More Forest Hall]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • HMP ... Forest Hall (1915):

Images, 2013, Forest Hall, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Forest Hall, Columbia River Gorge, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Bridal Veil Falls, Viewpoint, and Lodge ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway runs through Bridal Veil, with the Bridal Veil Lodge on the south and the Bridal Veil State Scenic Viewpoint on the north. A one-half mile trail from the Scenic Viewpoint leads to Bridal Veil Falls.

[More Bridal Veil]
[More Bridal Veil State Scenic Viewpoint]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • (HMP 28.3) ... Bridal Veil Lodge (1927):

  • (HMP 28.3) ... Bridal Veil Falls State Scenic Viewpoint:

Image, 2009, Bridal Veil Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridal Veil Falls, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken April 26, 2009.
Image, 2006, Bridal Veil Lodge, Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridal Veil Lodge, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken October 21, 2006.
Image, 2005, Cape Horn, Washington, from Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Cape Horn, Washington, as seen from Bridal Veil Viewpoint, Oregon. Biddle Butte rises above Cape Horn. Lava flows from Biddle Butte cap the basalts of Cape Horn. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Pillars of Hercules ...
The Pillars of Hercules are located at Columbia River Mile (RM) 131 and can be seen from Interstate 84 as well from the HCRH by hiking to the viewpoint at Bridal Veil and heading west along the trail.

[More Pillars of Hercules]

Penny Postcard, Pillars of Herculkes, ca.1910
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Penny Postcard: Pillars of Hercules, Oregon, ca.1910. Penny Postcard, ca.1910, "Pillars of Hercules, Banks of the Columbia River". The bluffs of the Bridal Veil area can be seen in the background. Published by Portland Post Card Col., Portland, Oregon (Made in Germany). Card #7054. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2005, Pillars of Hercules, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Pillars of Hercules, as seen from Bridal Veil, Oregon. View is looking west, with the one of the Pillars of Hercules on the left (mostly hidden in trees), train tracks and Interstate 84, and the Columbia River on the right. The southernmost pillar is out of the picture to the left. At one time this 120-foot-high column of basalt was a training site for mountain climbers. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Bridal Veil Bridge ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway's bridge over Bridal Veil Creek crosses above the falls, just east of the Bridal Veil Lodge.

[More Bridal Veil]

  • HMP 28.4 ... Bridal Veil Falls Bridge (1914):

    • "This bridge is a skewed 100-foot reinforced-concrete deck girder span in which the solid railings serve as continuous beams. The transverse deck support memebers function as deck girders. Width out-to-out is 23'-2", curb-to-curb is 21 feet. The unique design allowed the bridge to span both the falls and a nearby lumber company's log flumes." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This reinforced concrete through girder bridge, the main girder being 50 feet, has a total length of 110 feet. ... The falls is downstream or north of the bridge." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil Bridge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil Bridge, looking east. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil Bridge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil Bridge. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Bridal Veil Community ...
(to come)

[More Bridal Veil]

  • HMP ... Bridal Veil Community:

    • "A concrete-girder bridge directly above Bridal Veil Falls takes traffic across Bridal Veil Creek and into the mill town of Bridal Veil." [Mershon, C.E., 2006, The Columbia River Highway]

    • "Bridal Veil Falls gave the company's mill town its name. ...   When the settlement gained a post office, the official name became Bridal Veil. The town grew as Bridal Veil Lumbering Company prospered." [Mershon, C.E., 2006, The Columbia River Highway]

    • "A small community exists at Bridal Veil. Historic structures present in Bridal Veil include the Jacobsen residence and the Bridal Veil roadhouse." [HCRH Master Plan, 2005]

Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Foundation and stairs, Historic Columbia River Highway, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Palmer Mill Road ...
Palmer Mill Road heads south from the Historic Highway just before its junction with East Bridal Veil Road. Palmer Mill Road once led to the small community of Palmer, a mill location for the old Bridal Veil Lumber Company. Today the road is used as overflow parking for the Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead. The road is no longer accessible to the old townsite.

[More Palmer]

  • (HMP 29) ... Palmer Mill Road:

Image, 2006, Palmer Mill Road sign, Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Palmer Mill Road Sign, Historic Columbia River Highway. Palmer Mill Road branches off of the Historic Columbia River Highway above Bridal Veil. Image taken September 23, 2006.


Milepost Marker 29 ...
Historic Milepost Marker 29 is located at the intersection of the Columbia River Highway, East Bridal Veil Road (the road which heads back down to Interstate 84), and the Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead.

  • HMP 29 ... Milepost Marker 29:

Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Milepost Marker 29, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Intersection with East Bridal Veil Road ... Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead, return to Interstate 84, continuation of the HCRH ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway's intersection with East Bridal Veil Road provides a return to Interstate 84 and the Bridal Veil Post Office (a surviving building of the Bridal Veil Lumbering Company), the HCRH continuing east, and the parking for the Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest trailheads.

[More Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest]

  • (HMP 29) ... Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead:

  • HMP 29 ... East Bridal Veil Road, return to Interstate 84:

Image, 2015, HCRH at Angels Rest parking, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Angel's Rest and Devil's Rest Trailhead Parking. View looking west, taken from moving car heading east. Image taken October 22, 2015.
Image, 2006, Angel's Rest Trailhead sign, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Angel's Rest Trailhead sign, Historic Columbia River Highway. Palmer Mill Road is in the background branching off of the Historic Columbia River Highway. The trailhead is to the left. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at East Bridal Veil Road, the interchange to Interstate 84. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at East Bridal Veil Road, the interchange to Interstate 84. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Bridal Veil Lumbering Company ...
The Historic Columbia River Highway's intersection with East Bridal Veil Road provides a return to Interstate 84 and the Bridal Veil Post Office, a surviving building of the Bridal Veil Lumbering Company.

[More Bridal Veil Lumbering Company]

  • (HMP 29) ... Bridal Veil Lumbering Company:

Image, 2005, Bridal Veil Post Office, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridal Veil Post Office, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken June 29, 2005.


Coopey Falls ...
Coopey Falls is located along the Historic Columbia River Highway, one mile east of Bridal Veil. The 150-foot-high falls are located behind the old Jacobson Villa, now a convent of the Franciscan Sisters of the Eucharist. To the east lies the massive basalt ridge of Angels Rest.

[More Coopey Falls]

  • (HMP 29.2) ... Coopey Falls:

Image, 2016, Jacobson Villa and Coopey Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Jacobson Villa and Coopey Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.
Image, 2016, Coopey Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Coopey Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 17, 2016.


Views along the Highway ...

Images, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Stone House across from Coopey Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway. View shot through front window, moving car. View looking east. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2005, Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway. View looking west. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2005, Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Fall colors, Historic Columbia River Highway. View looking east. Image taken October 22, 2005.


Milepost Marker 30 ...
  • HMP 30 ... Milepost Marker 30:

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Milepost Marker 30, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.


Forest Service Masonry Sign Post ...
  • HMP 31 ... Forest Service Masonry Sign Post (1920s):

    • "This masonry sign post, constructed of mortared rubble, once displayed an entrance sign for Oregon National Forest, and after 1924 the Mount Hood National Forest. The post is in poor condition since a vehicle hit it in 1996." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • (HMP 31) ... Forest Service Masonry Sign Post (ca.2006):  

Image, 2013, Forest Service Sign Post, HCRH, Oregon, click to enlarge
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U.S. Forest Service Sign Post, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Reconstructed ca.2006. Image taken February 19, 2013.


Benson State Recreation Area ...
Benson State Recreation Area stretches along the southern shore of the Columbia River, and is located approximately between River Miles (RM) 135 and 137, and passes such falls as Mist Falls, Wahkeena Falls, and Multnomah Falls. The lakes within the park are stocked with thousands of rainbow trout each month between March and October. The recreation area was named for Simon Benson who was a lumber magnate, philanthropist, and one of the principal promoters of the Historic Columbia River Highway. Access to the park is from Interstate 84 heading east, however the two lakes can be viewed while driving the HCRH.

[More Benson State Recreation Area]

  • (HMP 30 - 32) ... Benson State Recreation Area:

    • "Simon Benson purchased a 400-acre tract, which included Wahkeena Falls, and deeded it to the city of Portland in 1915 for use as a park. Subsequently, the land was divided between the Oregon State Parks Division and the USDA Forest Service to become Benson State Park (near Multnomah Falls) and the Wahkeena Falls Recreation Area. In the 1930s, the Forest Service developed land north of the CRH into a day-use area as part of a Civilian Conservation Corps project to improve its facilities in the Gorge." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2005, Benson State Recreation Area, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Benson State Recreation Area, Oregon, as viewed from the Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken October 22, 2005.


Mist Falls ...
The 500-foot-high Mist Falls is the second tallest falls in the State of Oregon, with Multnomah Falls, located one mile upstream, being higher. Mist Falls is located above Benson State Recreation Area at Columbia River Mile (RM) 135. Mist Falls is a 20-feet-wide tiered falls with 2 drops, and is located on Mist Creek. The falls is one of many falls in the Columbia River Gorge which can be seen from the Historic Columbia River Highway, however the best views are from the Benson State Recreation Area off of Interstate 84.

[More Mist Falls]

  • (HMP 31.5) ... Mist Falls:

Image, 2009, Mist Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Mist Falls, Oregon, as seen from Benson State Park. Image taken January 13, 2009.


Multnomah Lodge ("Mist Lodge") ...
Multnomah Lodge, also known as "Mist Lodge", was built in 1916 at the base of Mist Falls. It burned down in 1929. The fireplace and chimney, along with a Columbia River Highway drain cap, are still visible today.

[More Mist Falls]
[More HCRH Roadhouses]

  • (HMP 31.5) ... Mist Lodge (1916):

Advertisement, Chanticleer Inn, 1919
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Multnomah Lodge, ILLUSTRATION, "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916.
Source: "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, published by Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.
Image, 2013, Multnomah Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Fireplace and chimney remains, Multnomah Lodge, Mist Falls, Oregon. Multnomah Lodge burned in 1929. The Historic Columbia River Highway is in the foreground. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2013, Multnomah Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway drain cover, Multnomah Lodge, Mist Falls, Oregon. Multnomah Lodge burned in 1929. Image taken February 19, 2013.


Approach to Wahkeena Falls ...

[More Wahkeena Falls]

  • (HMP 31.6) ... Approach to Wahkeena Falls:

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Approach to Wahkeena Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. View from moving car heading east. Image taken October 22, 2015.


Wahkeena Creek Bridge ...
[More Wahkeena Falls]

  • HMP 31.6 ... Wahkeena Creek Bridge (1914):

    • "This 18-foot bridge is a simple reinforced-concrete slab span." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This small structure is a 14-foot reinforced concrete slab bridge. [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Penny Postcard, Columbia River Highway, Oregon, 1911
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Penny Postcard: "Columbia River Highway Bridge at Gordon Falls", postmarked 1917.
Penny Postcard postmarked August 1917. Published by Louis Scheiner, Portland, Oregon. Card #4577. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2015, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Bridge over Wahkeena Creek, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.


Wahkeena Falls ...
Wahkeena Falls is located one-half mile west of the more-famous Multnomah Falls. A short trail links the two. Wahkeena Falls is 242 feet high and is a "tiered" falls. These falls were once known as "Gordon Falls" for F.E. Gordon, a pioneer landowner. Confusion arose between Gordon Creek near the Sandy River and Gorton Creek near Cascade Locks. In 1915 the Mazamas were appointed to name points on the Columbia River Highway and clear up confusion of similar names in the area. Wahkeena Falls and Wahkeena Creek were chosen. "Wahkeena" comes from the Yakama Tribe and means "most beautiful".

[More Wahkeena Falls]

  • HMP 31.6 ... Wahkeena Falls Footbridge and Masonry Guard Walls (1914):

    • "This rubble masonry footbridge is 46 feet long and 8 feet wide and contains a semi-circular barrel arch with a 14-foot opening. The masonry guard walls, with concrete caps, continue east and west of the bridge for some distance. Simon Benson paid for the bridge's construction, as he did for the Multnomah Falls Footbridge." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The pedestrian footbridge is located at the base of Wahkeena Falls on the Larch Mountain Trail. The bridge is 46 feet long and 8 feet wide. The small concrete brige contains a semi-circular barrel arch with an opening of 14 feet. The bridge is covered with rubble masonry. The bridge was donated by Simon Benson, who gave the falls area to the city of Portland." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 31.6 ... Wahkeena Falls Recreation Site (created 1915):

    • "Simon Benson purchased a 400-acre tract, which included Wahkeena Falls, and deeded it to the city of Portland in 1915 for use as a park. Subsequently, the land was divided between the Oregon State Parks Division and the USDA Forest Service to become Benson State Park (near Multnomah Falls) and the Wahkeena Falls Recreation Area. In the 1930s, the Forest Service developed land north of the CRH into a day-use area as part of a Civilian Conservation Corps projet to improve its facilities in the Gorge." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This recreation site, now part of Mount Hood National Forest, began as a private donation from Simon Benson." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 31.6 ... Simon Benson Memorial Plaque (1940s):

  • HMP 31.6 ... Portland Rotary Club Bronze Fountain Artwork (1916, 1985, 2014):

    • "The Portland chapter of Rotary International dedicated this large bronze cog, the symbol of the organization, at Wahkeena Falls in 1916. It was the centerpiece of a large fountain. In 1985, the artwork was installed at Horsetail Falls, without its fountain base. The legend on one side of the cog reads "Portland Rotary Club 1916". On the reverse, the legend read the organization's motto, "He Profits Most Who Serves Best"." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • About 2014 the Rotary wheel was moved back to Wahkeena Falls.

Penny Postcard, Wahkeena Falls, Columbia River Highway, Oregon, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Wahkeena Falls, Columbia River Highway, Oregon, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Wah-Kee-Na Falls, Columbia River Highway, Oregon.". Published by Chas. S. Lipschuetz Company, Portland, Oregon. Card #307. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2013, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Wahkeena Falls with walking bridge, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2013, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Wahkeena Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2013, Simon Benson plaque, HCRH, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Simon Benson plaque, Wahkeena Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2015, Wahkeena Falls, click to enlarge
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Portland Rotary Wheel at Wahkeena Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.


West Multnomah Falls Viaduct ...
[More Multnomah Falls]

  • HMP 31.9 ... West Multnomah Falls Viaduct (1914):

    • "This 400-foot viaduct consists of twenty 20-foot reinforced-concrete slab spans. Two parallel rows of 16-foot square columns, 17'-6" apart, support the deck. Roadway width is about 18 feet. The structure was designed to ride along the hillside above the railroad mainline because of tight right-of-way clearances. A concrete retaining wall runs along its south elevation. The arched railings were constructed of plaster concrete and metal lath. They represent a memeber of the family of bridge railing designs found on the CRH." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This viaduct is 400 feet long and contains twenty 20-foot slab spans. Lancaster decided to "bridge" a steep unstable slope which extended down to the railroad right-of-way, rather than to excavate or fill. Either cutting or filling may have caused the mountain slope, for hundreds of feet above, to slide." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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West Multnomah Falls Viaduct, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken October 22, 2015.
Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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West Multnomah Falls Viaduct, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Multnomah Falls and Lodge ...
Multnomah Falls, at 620 feet, is the second highest year-round waterfall in the United States. Nearly two million visitors a year come to see Oregon's number one tourist place. Benson Bridge was built in 1914 across the falls, and the Multnomah Falls Lodge, at one time a stopover on the Historic Columbia River Highway (HCRH), was built in 1925. The HCRH crosses Multnomah Creek below the falls. Multnomah Falls is located at Columbia River Mile 136 and can be reached from both Interstate 84 or the Historic Columbia River Highway.

[More Multnomah Creek]
[More Multnomah Falls]
[More Multnomah Falls Lodge]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Multnomah Creek Bridge (1914):

    • "This 67-foot reinforced-concrete structure includes a 40-foot five-rib solid spandrel arch. It provides an 18-foot-wide road deck. The concrete rails consist of segmental arch panels with beveled caps and concrete end posts." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This small reinforced concrete deck arch is 67 feet in length. The barrel arch has solid spandrel walls and is 40 feet in length." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Multnomah Falls Lodge (1925, 1926):

    • "Since 1915, when the CRH opened for travel as far as Multnomah Falls, the site attracted concessionaires who catered to motorists' needs. They included sandwich vendors and others who set up stands near the former OWRN siding at Multnomah Falls. In 1925, the city of Portland completed the first phase of Multnomah Falls Lodge, a day-use facility that could provide travelers with meals and provide relief from the Gorge's weather. Noted Portland architect A.E. Doyle designed the stone Cascadia-style building. ... The Lodge's exterior walls were faced in native split fieldstone laid irregularly. Wood framing was used in the upper story and roof system. The steeply-pitched cedar-shingled gable roof includes dormers and massive chimneys. ... In 1926, a wing was added to the eastern end of the 1925 building. Subsequent alterations were made to the interior and exterior over the next several decades. Most have been accomplished with sensitivity to the original structure. The building houses a restaurant, gift shop, interpretive center, snack bar, and restroom." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The lodge was built by the city of Portland to capitalize on teh booming tourist trade through the Columbia River Gorge. (On June 5, 1916, part of the dedication ceremonies of the Columbia River Highway was held at Multnomah Falls on the site where the lodge would be built.)" [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Multnomah Falls Footbridge (Benson Footbridge) and Trail (1914):

    • "Spanning the lower cascade of Multnomah Falls, the Benson Footbridge is a 45-foot reinforced-concrete parabolic barrel deck arch anchored into the rock cliffs (total length is 52 feet). Railings were constructed of pre-cast concrete cylindrical balusters and beveled caps. Curtain walls were made of spandrel columns topped with abbreviated, arched walls. The trial leads from Multnomah Falls Lodge to the bridge, and beyond to the summit of Larch Mountain." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This reinforced concrete deck arch is located at Multnomah Falls, below the upper falls (542-foot drop) and above the lower falls (69-foot drop). The benefactor of the bridge was Simon Benson. ... The total length of the bridge is 52 feet. The deck rib arch spans 45 feet. The width is seven feet. The bridge was erected as one of the first continuous pour concrete bridges in the United States. The process took between 24-36 hours to complete." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Pedestrian Bridge north of the CRH (1960s):

    • "This is a concrete slab span constructed to convey visitors coming from the nearby Interstate 84 interchange parking lot across Multnomah Creek to the Lodge." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 32.1 ... DAR Masonry Drinking Fountain (1916):

    • "In 1916, during dedication ceremonies at the site marking the opening of the CRH in Multnomah County, the Multnomah Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Portland, Oregon, dedicated this fountain to the "Oregon Pioneers 1836 to 1859"." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Simon Benson Memorial Plaque (1940s):

    • "This bronze plaque includes a likeness of Benson's face. It is a duplicate of the plaque located at the Wahkeena Falls Recreation Site." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 32.1 ... Multnomah Falls Recreation Area:

    • "Portland hotel owner and philanthropist Simon Benson purchased a 400-acre tract, which included Multnomah Falls, and deeded it to the city of Portland in 1915 for use as a park. The site is noted for its walking trails and its pedestrian bridge over the lower falls. In 1925, the city of Portland constructed Multnomah Falls Lodge, a day-use facility offering meals and traveler information. Beginning in 1939, the city gave up its land holdings and buildings in the Columbia Gorge either to the state highway department's State Parks Division or to the USDA Forest Service, Mount Hood National Forest. By 1943, Portland completed transfer of the Multnomah Falls site and lodge to the Forest Service." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2005, Multnomah Falls, Benson Bridge, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls and Benson Bridge, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Imag5, 2004, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Images, 2005, Multnomah Creek, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Creek, Oregon flowing beneath the Historic Columbia River Highway Bridge. Image taken October 22, 2005.


East Multnomah Falls Viaduct ...
[More Multnomah Falls]

  • HMP 32.3 ... East Multnomah Falls Viaduct (1914):

    • "This 860-foot viaduct originally consisted of forty-three 20-foot reinforced-concrete slab spans. The deck was supported by two parallel rows of 16-foot-square columns, 17'-6" apart. Roadway width is about 18 feet. To provide greater stability to the structure, the Oregon State Highway Department, in 1922, added sets of intermediate posts and transverse walls at the midpoint of each span. Like the West Multnomah Falls Viaduct, this structure rises up the hillside because of tight right-of-way clearances with the nearby railroad mainline, and has a concrete retaining wall running along its south elevation. The arched railings were constructed of plaster concrete and metal lath. They represent a member of the family of bridge railing designs found on the CRH." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This reinforced concrete slab viaduct is 860 feet in length and is the longest remaining viaduct on the highway. The viaduct consists of 86 10-foot slabs supported on 16-inch square piers. It is very similar in design to the West Multnomah Falls Viaduct." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2005, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway, at Multnomah Falls. View shot through front window, moving car. Image taken June 29, 2005.
Image, 2012, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway at Multnomah Falls. View shot from moving car. Image taken June 15, 2012.


Bridge west of Oneonta Gorge Creek ...
[More Oneonta area]

  • HMP 33 ... Bridge west of Oneonta Gorge Creek (ca.1980):

    • "Historically, there has been a structure at this crossing of an unnamed creek since the CRH's construction. The present masonry parapet walls on this small span date from the early 1980s, and represent an unsuccessful attempt to "restore" this bridge in the highway's style." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Images, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Small bridge across un-named creek, around Milepost 33, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.


Oneonta ...
Oneonta Gorge and Oneonta Creek are located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 138. Oneonta Falls is located about half a mile up Oneonta Creek. The Oneonta area can be reached via the Historic Columbia River Highway.

[More Oneonta]

  • HMP 34.3 ... Oneonta Gorge Creek Bridge (1914):

    • "This four-span 80-foot reinforced-concrete deck girder trestle is 24 feet wide and has a roadway measuring 22 feet. The curb and guardrail form an integral unit, cantilevered out from the outside deck girder. The delicate arched railing panels were constructed from plaster concrete and metal lath, and are identical to those seen ont he Multnomah Falls viaducts. A staircase at the western end leads down to the creek, where visitors were encouraged to walk upstream 0.5 miles to view Oneonta Falls." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The reinforced concrete girder bridge ...  is 80 feet in length. A stairwell is located at the west end for access to the creek and trail. As constructed, the highway at the bridge passed into the Oneonta Tunnel. The tunnel was permanently closed in the late 1940s and a new bridge parallel to this bridge was built. The bridge now serves parking and pedestrian uses." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • HMP 34.3 ... Oneonta Gorge Creek Bridge (1948):

    • "This reinforced-concrete deck girder span is 48 feet long and was constructed on abutments from a previous railroad bridge. The span bypassed the 1914 Oneonta Gorge Creek Bridge and the Oneonta Tunnel. The railroad's mainline was realigned on fill material and its bridge was moved to a new location over the stream." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "This reinforced concrete slab span is 80 feet in length, 21.4 feet wide, and consists of four 20-foot slab spans. This bridge was constructed to replace the 1914 brige when Oneonta Tunnel was closed. The highway alignment was changed to skirt the tunnel, which also necessitated a realignment of the railroad tracks to the north." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

Image, 2005, Oneonta Gorge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridges crossing Oneonta, Oregon. Image taken June 29, 2005.

View looking north showing the original 1914 Columbia River Highway bridge railing, the 1948 new highway bridge (current Highway bridge), and the re-aligned 1948 railroad bridge.
Image, 2005, Oneonta Creek Bridge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Bridge over Oneonta Creek, Oregon. View is looking downstream. Image taken June 29, 2005.


Oneonta Tunnel ...
In 1914 the Historic Columbia River Highway crossed Oneonta Creek and proceeded on through a newly-built 125-foot-long tunnel through the 200-foot-high bluff on the creek's right bank. With construction of Interstate 84 the tunnel fell into dis-use and in 1948 the tunnel was filled with debris and vegetation covered up the entrances. In the summer of 2006 the Oneonta Tunnel was dug-out and work began to incorporate the tunnel as part of a walking/bike path along the Historic Columbia River Highway. On August 19, 2006, the tunnel re-opened.

[More Oneonta]

  • HMP 34.3 ... Oneonta Tunnel (1914):

    • "This tunnel consists of a 125-foot straight bore through a 200-foot-tall outcropping of Columbia River basalt. The 20-foot bore has a vertical clearance of just over 19 feet. Concrete was injected into the basalt prior to cutting the tunnel to prevent the outcropping from crumbling onto a nearby railroad mainline. The tunnel was lined with timber sets and lagging. It was bypassed and filled with rubble in 1948." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

    • "The Oneonta Tunnel is 125 feet from portal to portal. Because of the natural conditions, only 18 feet of rock was left to support the side of the mountain (205 feet) next to the railroad. In order to prevent thousands of tons of rock cascading down onto the adjacent railroad tracks when the blasating began, it was necessary to go to considrable extra work to strengthen the cliff before digging into the tunnel. The weaker sections were plugged with concrete before the blasting started, one of Lancaster's many innovations. Because of the continouous falling of rock from inside and outside the tunnel, the route was changed and the tunnel abandoned in the late 1940s. It is now filled with rubble." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

  • (HMP 34.3) ... Oneonta Tunnel (2006):

Image, 2005, Oneonta Gorge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Tunnel location, Oneonta Gorge, Oregon. View before the tunnel was re-opened. Image taken October 22, 2005.
Image, 2009, Oneonta Tunnel, click to enlarge
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Oneonta Tunnel, west portal, Historic Columbia River Highway. Original Highway bridge over Oneonta Creek in the foreground. Image taken April 26, 2009.
Image, 2009, Oneonta Tunnel, click to enlarge
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Oneonta Tunnel, looking west, Historic Columbia River Highway. View of original Highway bridge over Oneonta Creek. Image taken April 26, 2009.


Horsetail Falls ...
Horsetail Falls is a classic example of a horsetail formation. The 176-foot-tall lower falls is located on Horsetail Creek and can be viewed from a turnout on the Historic Columbia River Highway, 2.5 miles east of Multnomah Falls. The name "Horsetail Falls" has been used since Pioneer days.

[More Horsetail Falls]

  • HMP 34.6 ... Horsetail Falls Bridge (1914):

    • "This structure is a reinforced concrete girder span, 80 feet in length. It consists of three 20-foot slabs. This span is very similar to the 1914 Oneonta Gorge Bridge. ... South of the bridge is Horsetail Falls (221 feet), visible from the bridge." [National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, 1983]

    • "This three-span 60-foot reinforced-concrete deck girder trestle is 24 feet wide and has a roadway measuring 22 feet. The curb and guardrail form an integral unit, cantilevered out from the girder." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 34.6 ... Masonry Walls and Kiosk (1940):

    • "The USDA Forest Service improved the area south of the CRH and near the Horsetail Falls plunge pool in 1940. This work included construction of masonry walls in the NPS "Rustic"-style, and an information kiosk. The Kiosk has a masonry base, with "1940" carved in the rock. A roofed timber structure, in a complimentary "Rustic" style is mounted above the base. These structures were refurbished during a 1985 project designed to enlarge the developed area." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 34.6 ... Masonry Walls and Parking Area (1985):

    • "In 1985, the USDA Forest Service landscaped a parking lot north of the CRH at this site. It also refurbished the existing walls south of the highway and constructed others in the same architectural style." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

  • HMP 34.6 ... Horsetail Falls Developed Area:

    • "Horsetail Falls empties into a plunge pool southeast of the Horsetail Falls Bridge on the CRH. Masonry walls dating from 1940 and 1985, and the NPS "Rustic" style, define the plunge pool's northeast boundary. A picnic area is located east of the picnic area. Nearby, is located a large bronze cog, once part of a fountain located at Wahkeena Falls. On the north side of the CRH, a parking lot was improved and enlarged in 1985. It is bordered with "Rustic"-style walls and masonry curbs." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Penny Postcard, Bridal Veil Falls, Oregon, ca.1930
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Penny Postcard: Horsetail Falls, Oregon, ca.1920. Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1920, "Horsetail Falls, Columbia River Highway, Oregon". Caption on back reads: "Horsetail Falls. A fine view of this beautiful water fall is obtained from the Columbia River Highway. The Horsetail Falls are 208 feet high. This picture shows the Cathedral Domes beyond.". Published by Lipschuetz and Katz Company, Portland, Oregon. Card is postmarked 1920. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Image, 2015, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Approach to Horsetail Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 30, 2015.
Image, 2005, Horsetail Falls, click to enlarge
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Stonework, Horsetail Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.
Image, 2005, Horsetail Falls, click to enlarge
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Horsetail Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 6, 2005.


Milepost Marker 35 ...
Milepost Marker 35 is located at Ainsworth State Park.

[More Ainsworth State Park]

  • HMP 35 ... Milepost Marker 35:

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway mileage marker, Picnic area, Ainsworth State Park, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Ainsworth State Park ...
Ainsworth State Park, with day-use and campground facilities, is located along the Historic Columbia River Highway at HMP 35. Downstream is Horsetail Falls and the Oneonta area, and upstream is the Oregon communities of Dodson and Warrendale. Further upstream is John B. Yeon State Park, another Historic Columbia River Highway park. Ainsworth State Park is located at Columbia River Mile 139 and can be reached from the HCRH or from an exit from Interstate 84.

[More Ainsworth State Park]

  • HMP 35.2 ... Ainsworth State Park (1933):

    • "Ainsworth State Park entered at Mile Post 35.20 is the next one eastward. Practically all of this tract lies above the highway, with the highway and railroad rights-of-way clipping off a small triangle at the northwest corner. It is described as being in Section 3, Township 1 North of Range 6 East, W.M., in Multnomah County, Oregon containing forty acres. This area was a gift to the State of Oregon by the late J.C. Ainsworth, and Alice H. Ainsworth, his wife, by deed dated July 29, 1933." [W.A. Langille and S.H. Boardman, 1946, State Parks Historical Sketches: Columbia Gorge State Parks, courtesy of Oregon State Archives website, 2014.]

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Picnic area, Ainsworth State Park, Oregon, Historic Columbia River Highway. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Masonry Drinking Fountain ...
[More Ainsworth State Park]

  • HMP 35.5 ... Masonry Drinking Fountain (1920s):

    • "This semi-circular masonry trough and faucet provided water for visitors and their vehicles. It was part of a fountain construction project conducted along many Oregon state highways in the 1920s." [National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996]

Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.
Image, 2014, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Fountain, Ainsworth State Park, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken June 5, 2014.


Interstate 84 Interchange ...
  • (HMP 36.2) ... Dodson interchange, return to Interstate 84:


Follow the Highway:


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, ...
 




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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    SEE: Columbia River Highway Route;    AND: Historic Columbia River Highway;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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© 2017, Lyn Topinka, "ColumbiaRiverImages.com", All rights reserved.
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February 2016