Lewis and Clark's Columbia River
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Lewis & Clark's Columbia River - "200 Years Later"
"Roadhouses of the Historic Columbia River Highway"
Includes ... Bridal Veil Lodge ... Chanticleer Inn ... Columbia Gorge Hotel ... Crown Point Chalet ... Forest Hall ... Latourell Chalet ... Lindsey Inn ... Mitchell Point ... Multnomah Falls Lodge ... Multnomah Lodge ... View Point Inn ... Golden Age of Postcards ...
Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Sign, View Point Inn, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Roadhouses of the Historic Columbia River Highway ...
In the early days of the Historic Columbia River Highway roadhouses along the route were the establishments to visit, attracting the rich and famous. Chanticleer Inn, now the location of the Portland Women's Forum Scenic Viewpoint, was only 22 miles from Portland. Crown Point Chalet overlooked Vista House and nearby was the View Point Inn, established in 1925. Latourell Chalet was established in 1914 and had a brief 3-month history and soon afterwards Maffet's Villa was built. Nearby was Forest Hall and Bridal Veil Lodge. Multnomah Lodge was located at the base of Mist Falls and Multnomah Falls Lodge still exists and is located at the beautiful Multnomah Falls, and further along the road were Lindsey Creek Inn and a roadhouse at Mitchell Point. Furthest along the route was the Columbia Gorge Hotel near Hood River, a resort still quite popular today.

Jewels of the Highway ...

"... Among the jewels of the highway and a focal point for tourists were Vista House and Crown Point. Crown Point is a basaltic promontory of the Columbia Gorge. It was one of the two sites where the highway was dedicated between Troutdale and Hood River in 1916. Atop Crown Point stands the Vista House (1918), an observation point for the Gorge. Vista House was designed by the architect Edgar Lazarus following Samuel Lancaster's suggestion that an observation point be placed at Crown Point.

Famous resort inns such as the Chanticleer Inn on the site of the Portland Women's Forum Park, the Crown Point Chalet above Vista House, the Wayfarer Inn in Corbett, and Faresh Hall in Bridleveil arose to serve the tourists. From Portland, rental touring cars and limousines were available from the Columbia River and City Sightseeing Service to bring tourists to the area. ..."


Source:    National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, View Point Inn, 1985, #85000367.

Roadhouses, Taverns, and Auto Camps ...

Life of the highway

"... The combined commercial and recreational traffic on the highway affected development in the gorge as well. As its promoters expected, the highway brought a flood of tourists to the gorge and towns boomed with the tourist trade. Establishments such as the Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other hotels and restaurants such as the Falls Villa at Latourell, Forrest Hall in Bridal Veil and Simon Benson's Columbia Gorge Hotel in Hood River served chicken or salmon dinners and "dainty lunches" to travellers. Various roadhouases and taverns dotting the highway provided entertainment and locally distilled spirits during Prohibition.

Auto camps were another option for the highway traveller. In the 1910s vacationers were taking to the roads like gypsies; thousands of middle-class families found auto touring an escape from railroad schedules and stuffy Victorian hotels. Sleeping on the ground by their Model Ts and dining out of tin cans warmed on the radiator, they described their tingling sense of self-reliance and closeness to nature as "Thoreau at 29 cents a gallon."

Hoping to capture the tourist dollar, towns such as Hood River and Cascade Locks designated free municipal campgrounds near the town center where motorists could pitch a tent for the night. ...   The free auto camps proved so popular that towns were later forced to charge fees to discourage vagabonds and freeloaders. With the fee system, private entrepreneurs entered the market. They steadily provided more and more amenities such as cabins, kitchenettes and carports as motorists shifted away from self-reliant tent-camping to more convenient, comfortable, home-like accommodations. Camping had become divorced from motor touring. Auto camps became auto courts, eventually evolving into the roadside motel. ..."


Source:    "Columbia River Highway, Options for Conservation and Reuse", 1981, Columbia River Highway Project


"Roadhouse Respite" ...
roadhouse RESPITE

"Opened in 1915, the Historic Columbia River Highway enticed tourists with its own special charm, and the spectacular scenery of the Gorge. Entrepreneurs quickly seized this opportunity on wheels and created a distinct feature of the early highway --- the roadhouse.

Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete."

Source:    Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013.


Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Roadhouses, etc.

  • Black and White Restaurant, The Dalles, Oregon ...
  • Bridal Veil Lodge, Bridal Veil, Oregon ...
  • Chanticleer Inn, Portland Women's Forum, Oregon ...
  • Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon ...
  • Crown Point Chalet, Crown Point, Oregon ...
  • Eagle Creek ...
  • Forest Hall ("Maxwell House"), Bridal Veil/Shepperd's Dell, Oregon ...
  • Happy Dell Auto Camp, Viento, Oregon ...
  • Latourell Falls Chalet, Latourell, Oregon ...
  • Lindsey Inn, Lindsey Creek, Oregon ...
  • Maffet's Villa, Latourell, Oregon ...
  • Mitchell Point "Tourist Spot", Mitchell Point, Oregon ...
  • Multnomah Falls Lodge, Multnomah Falls, Oregon ...
  • Multnomah Lodge ("Mist Lodge"), Mist Falls, Oregon ...
  • Rapids, Cascade Locks, Oregon ...
  • Tad's Chicken 'n Dumplins, Troutdale, Oregon ...
  • View Point Inn, Corbett, Oregon ...
  • Waukoma Hotel, Hood River, Oregon ...
  • Wayfarer Inn, Corbett, Oregon ...


Black and White Restaurant, The Dalles, Oregon ...
The Black and White Restaurant, located in The Dalles, Oregon, contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to be an "official station" for Columbia River Highway travelers.

"... Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete. ..." [Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013]

Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Bridal Veil Lodge ...
In 1927 the Bridal Veil Lodge and Auto Camp opened along the Historic Columbia River Highway. Today the Lodge is still there, located across from the Bridal Veil Falls State Scenic Viewpoint.

"... Fifty cents would get a good hot meal of roast pork, mashed potatoes, and vegetables fresh out of the garden. For another buck-fifty, you could pull the Ford around back and pitch a tent, or tuck in your family in one of the snug cabins or rooms in the lodge. ..." [Bridal Veil Lodge Bed & Breakfast website, 2006]

The Lodge was built in 1926 from timber harvested from the Gorge and milled at the Bridal Veil Mill.

"... The lodge exterior is faced in horizontal rough-planed siding, stained dark brown. Multi-paned casement windows cover the front, and a porch stretches the full length of the building, then adorned with planter boxes filled with geraniums, sweet peas, and flowering beans climbing up the fir-pole supports. Inside, the large front room on the main floor (which was the restaurant) is constructed of rough-cut board-and-batten with hemlock floors, kept shining with periodic swathings of hot linseed oil. Small black painted tables with turned legs and simple chairs with rawhide bottoms were placed along the windows and throughout the room. A wraparound counter also seated customers ..." [Bridal Veil Lodge Bed & Breakfast website, 2006]

The lodge closed shortly after World War II and became a family residence. However in 1987, the great-grandaughter of the original owners returned to the lodge, restored it to fine glory, and today the Lodge is open as a Bed & Breakfast. (Note, as of summer 2014 the Lodge is listed "For Sale".)


Image, 2006, Bridal Veil Lodge, Bridal Veil, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Bridal Veil Lodge, Bridal Veil, Oregon. Image taken October 21, 2006.


Chanticleer Inn ...
The Chanticleer Inn was one of the many roadhouses which sprang up along the Columbia River Highway, providing rest, meals, and some even offered overnight lodging. Chanticleer Inn was located at Chanticleer Point just west of Crown Point.

The Chanticleer Inn was built in 1912 before the construction of the Columbia River Highway, with access to the Inn being by train to the Depot at Rooster Rock, or by boat up the Columbia River to the dock, and then climbing steep stairs or taking a horse-drawn coach up a windy road (later a motorized coach). In 1915 when the Highway opened, access became easier and the Inn prospered.

".. What is Chanticleer? ... It is the best place on earth to be served with a delicious home-cooked cream chicken dinner, country style, crisp hot biscuits and dainty desserts. Salmon dinners in season. Chanticleer is an ideal place for ladies' afternoon teas and card parties. Reservations for such functions will be promptly attended to. No liquors served at Chanticleer. Parties wishing to make reservations for meals or sleeping accomdations, phone Long Distance Corbett, Oregon, and ask for Chanticleer. ..." ["PDXHistory.com" Website, 2006, from an old Chanticleer advertising]

Menu found on back of Penny Postcard (see card below).

MENU CHANTICLEER INN

Regular Chicken Dinner $1.50
    Soup, Salad, Relishes.
    Fried or Creamed Chicken, Vegetables.
    Delicious Hot Biscuits.
    Home-made Jellies and Jams.
    Dessert -- Fruits of Season or Ice Cream.
    Drinks -- Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, or Milk.
Luncheon $1.00
    Salad, Relishes.
    Fried Chicken, Potatoes.
    Delicious Hot Biscuits.
    Home-made Jellies and Jams.
    Dessert -- Fruits of Season or Ice Cream.
    Drinks -- Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, or Milk.
Lunch 50c
    Sandwiches or Hot Biscuits.
    Home-made Jellies and Jams.
    Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, or Milk.
Lunch 25c
    Bread and Butter, or Lettuce Sandwich.
    Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, or Milk.

Tea and Toast, 25c
Ice Cream, 25c, Ice Cream and Cake, 35c.

NO LIQUORS SOLD OR SERVED

Soft Drings, 15c
    Lemonade, White Rock, Grape Juice, Logan
    Berry Juice, Ginger Ale, Root Beer, Grapine,
    R-Porter, Coco Cola, Cherry Port.

Salmon Dinners in Season

Chanticleer Inn, Corbett, Oregon
Phone, Long Distance Chanticleer, or
Main 8842, Portland, Oregon


Chanticleer Inn burned down October 8, 1930. The site was purchased by the Portland Women's Forum and donated to the Oregon State Parks amd Recreation Department.

CHANTICLEER INN
ON THE COLUMBIA HIGHWAY
Twenty-two miles East of Portland. Elevation 1,000 feet. A commanding view of the Columbia River Gorge for seventy miles.
Can accommodate Banquet Parties up to Three Hundred.
Our dinner dancing parties are popular.
Do not fail to see the view from our dining-room. It has no equal in America.
Chicken and Salmon Dinners a Specialty. Sleeping Accommodations. Afternoon Teas Daintily Served.
Can be reached any time of the year by hard surfaced road.
For special party rates Chanticleer Inn, Corbett, Ore., phone Long Distance Chanticleer.



Source:    Advertisement appearing in "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, Published by The Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.

Penny Postcard, Chanticleer Inn, ca.1916
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Penny Postcard: Approach to Chanticleer Inn, Columbia River Highway, ca.1916.
Penny Postcard, ca.1916. On back is printed "Menu Chanticleer Inn", including "Regular Chicken Dinner" for $1.50. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Chanticleer Inn, ca.1916
Click image to enlarge
Detail, Penny Postcard: Approach to Chanticleer Inn, Columbia River Highway, ca.1916.
Penny Postcard, ca.1916. On back is printed "Menu Chanticleer Inn", including "Regular Chicken Dinner" for $1.50. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Penny Postcard, Chanticleer Inn, ca.1916
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Chanticleer Inn, ca.1916.
Penny Postcard, ca.1916, "Chanticleer Inn, Columbia Highway, Ore." Year given as 1916 on "PDXHistory.com" Website, with comment "the back porch was enlarged and enclosed". Card #647. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Advertisement, Chanticleer Inn, 1919
Click image to enlarge
Advertisement: Chanticleer Inn, 1919.
Source: "The Automobile Blue Book", 1919, vol.9.


Columbia Gorge Hotel ...
The location of the Columbia Gorge Hotel was originally developed in 1904 by Bobby Rand, a Hood River pioneer, as the Waw Gwin Gwin Hotel, named after the nearby waterfall. Steamers would drop off their passengers who would then climb steps to reach the hotel. In 1920, Rand sold the hotel to Simon Benson who had just helped complete the Columbia Gorge Scenic Highway. Benson's dream was to create an opulent hotel for travelers at the end of this road. He hired some of the same Italian stone masons that had built the highway to embellish his hotel.
[More]

Image, 2006, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Image, 2006, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Wah Gwin Gwin Falls, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken May 10, 2006.
Image, 2006, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Tulip, Columbia Gorge Hotel, Hood River, Oregon. Image taken May 10, 2006.


Crown Point Chalet ...
On the south side of Crown Point, on a bluff overlooking Vista House and the point, was once located the "Crown Point Chalet", a famous roadhouse along the Historic Columbia River Highway. The Crown Point Chalet was built in 1915 by Mrs. Margaret Henderson, who was also a part of the history of Chanticleer Inn and the short-lived Latourell Falls Chalet.

"... Leaving the Chanticleer Inn to have her own eating establishment, Mrs. Henderson built the short-lived Latourell Falls Chalet in 1914 and it was an immediate success. Unfortunately, it burned just three months after opening and she lost everything, including a fine library and handcrafted furniture. With her ambitious spirit and strong determination, Mrs. Henderson, or Bidy, as she was called, set out almost immediately to build again. Bidy enlisted the help of many of Portlandís prominent businessmen, who bought $20 dinner books. This time, she chose a spot overlooking picturesque Crown Point and christened the new establishment The Crown Point Chalet. ... Dignitaries far and wide would make their way to the Crown Point Chalet to experience Mrs. Hendersonís legendary hospitality and country-fried chicken served in the ambiance of a mountain chalet. ..." ["PDXHistory.com" website, 2006]

The Finest Dinners!
The Grandest View

HOMELIKE AS YOU WOULD LIKE IT
DINNERS THRU THE DAY AND EVENING,
NO OVER NIGHT ACCOMODATIONS



CROWN POINT CHALET
"Where Rolls The Oregon"
HOME OF MRS. HENDERSON'S
FAMOUS CHICKEN DINNERS


On Columbia River Highway - adjoining Vista House



Source:    Advertisement in "The Automobile Blue Book", 1919, vol.9.


Crown Point Chalet closed in 1927 with the declining health of Mrs. Henderson. The building was demolished in the 1950s. A narrow road to the south of the Vista House parking area leads to the Chalet's location.

Penny Postcard, Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Crown Point Chalet, ca.1920.
Penny Postcard, ca.1920, "Mrs. Henderson's Chalet, Crown Point." Photo copyright Cross & Dimmitt. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Advertisement, Crown Point Chalet, 1919
Click image to enlarge
Advertisement: Crown Point Chalet, 1919.
Source: "The Automobile Blue Book", 1919, vol.9.
Image, 2013, Crown Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Road to Crown Point Chalet, Crown Point, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Eagle Creek ...
Eagle Creek is located on the Oregon side of the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 146.5, at the upstream end of the Bonneville Dam. Downstream is Tanner Creek and upstream is Ruckel Creek. Eagle Creek is the location of the first U.S. Forest Service Campground, established in 1916. From 1915 to 1937, a privately owned campground northeast of the bridge rented cabins with attached garages. A two-story lodge offered home cooking, fishing supplies, and groceries. The Cascade Salmon Hatchery was constructed on this site in the 1950s.
[More]

Eagle Creek Recreation Area:

"In 1915, the Oregon National Forest (by 1924 the Mount Hood National Forest) established the first improved forest campground in the United States near Eagle Creek, south and east of the CRH, as the Eagle Creek Forest Camp. It included day-use picnic facilities, good water, and sanitary conveniences. By the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) had greatly enlarged the Eagle Creek Campground, constructing several major buildings. From 1915 to 1937, a privately owned campground northeast of the bridge rented cabins with attached garages. A two-story lodge offered home cooking, fishing supplies, and groceries. The Cascade Salmon Hatchery was constructed on this site in the 1950s. A suspension bridge constructed over Eagle Creek in 1936 to provide access to the Eagle Creek Trail was destroyed in a winter storm in 1996."


Source:    National Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1996.


Image, 2006, Cascade Fish Hatchery from Eagle Creek Bridge, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Cascade Fish Hatchery from Eagle Creek Bridge, Oregon. Image taken September 16, 2006.


Forest Hall ...
Forest Hall, also known as "Maxwell House", was built in 1915 and was one of the many roadhouses along the Columbia River Highway. Forest Hall was located 1/4 mile east of Shepperd's Dell. Today it is a private residence.

According to Clarence Mershon in "The Columbia River Highway" (2006):

"... a stately structure that opened for business in 1916. Built as a restaurant by Nettie Arnold and Anne Hibler, Forest Hall later came into the possession of Elsa Maxwell, who operated the restaurant as the Maxwell House for many years. The historic structure, owned by Patrick and Patricia Brothers, is now a private residence. ..."

FOREST HALL
One-fourth mile east of Shepperd's Dell

"A cool, restful Colonial house in a setting of big fir trees, with the Pillars of Hercules in the background and the Pallisades rising across the Columbia River.

On the east is a court enclosed by a delicate lattice-work of fine Colonial design, in the center of which stands a large fir tree. In the west wing is is an enclosed veranda, daintily furnished, adapting itself admirable to the comfort and convenience of guests.

The interior -- a scene from the old South -- mahogany which graced a stately plantation home, known as Forest Park, near Lexington, Kentucky, when the pioneers were first making their way over the Oregon trail, silver and glass and old-fashioned flowers. Miss Ann Hibbler is a hostess one delights to meet, gentle and courtesous. Black Eva, who presides, was one of the famous cooks of Kentucky before she transferred her art and traditions to the West."


Source:    "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, Published by The Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.


[More]

Advertisement, Chanticleer Inn, 1919
Click image to enlarge
Forest Hall, ILLUSTRATION, "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916.
Source: "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, published by Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.
Images, 2013, Forest Hall, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Forest Hall, Columbia River Gorge, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Happy Dell Auto Camp ...
Happy Dell Auto Camp, Columbia River Mile (RM) 161, Viento, Oregon.

Penny Postcard, Happy Dell Auto Camp, Viento, Oregon, ca.1935
Click image to enlarge
Penny Postcard: Happy Dell Auto Camp, Viento, Oregon, ca.1935.
Penny Postcard, Postmarked 1935, "Happy Dell Auto Camp - Viento, Oregon - Columbia River Highway." Sawyer image. Card 14-909. Card is postmarked September 8, 1935. In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.


Latourell Falls Chalet and Maffett's Villa ...
For a brief six months in 1914, a roadhouse existed at Latourell Falls, on the hill on the south side of the Columbia River Highway and the east side of Latourell Falls. The owner of the establishment, Mrs. Henderson, had been part owner in the Chanticleer Inn, located downstream, and had left to establish her own eatery. After being open only a few months the "Latourell Falls Chalet" burned, leaving nothing behind. In 1915, within five months of the demise of the Falls Chalet, "Maffet's Villa" (also known as "Latourell Villa" or "Falls Villa"), was built on the north side of the Columbia Highway, across from the burned Latourell Falls Chalet. It was torn down in 1959.
[More]

Images, 2013, Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Guy W. Talbot State Park at Latourell Falls, Oregon, looking east. Image taken March 3, 2013.

Maffett's Villa was located on the left in this image, and Latourell Falls Chalet was on the hill on the right in this image. Today this area is part of the Guy W. Talbot State Park.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Roadhouse information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Latourell Falls Chalet on information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Images, 2013, Info sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Maffett's Villa ("Falls Villa") on information sign, Latourell Falls, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Lindsey Inn ...
Lindsey Inn and Garage was located at the base of Lindsey Creek Falls.


Lindsey Inn
and
Garage
56 Miles from Portland and 12 Miles from Hood River
Summer Camp for the Outing Season
Meals, Soft Drinks, Cigars, etc.
TIRES     OILS     GASOLINE     REPAIRS
SERVICE CAR
A.W. MOHR, Proprietor
Phone Lindsey



Source:    Add appearing in "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, Published by The Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.


"Mitchell Point Tourist Spot" ...
"In 1912, Charles W. and Helena Parker established a summer home here at Mitchell Point. With the construction of the new Columbia River Highway and Mitchell Point Tunnel (east of here) in 1915, the Parkers' place became a one-of-a-kind landmark. Motorists stopped here to enjoy the grand view of the river -- and to admire the "Tunnel of Many Vistas," an engineering marvel of the day.

In the early 1930s, Elsie "Babe" Tenney, a single mother from Oklahoma, bought the Parker property. A savvy and hard-workng businesswoman, Babe ran a grill, service station, roadhouse, and rental cabins -- all while raising two sons.

Throughout Prohibition and the Great Depression, Babe's tourist stop earned a reputation as a place to cast away cares and woes. Here, you could eat a hearty meal, Lindy Hop (swing dance) to a hot Portland band, and rent a room for the night. Rumor has it that moonshine may have enlivened the good times.

Babe Tenney died in 1944, and her family sold the property. Later owners built a small motel. By the 1950s, the new water-level highway (Interstate 84) bypassed the site and business suffered. The owners donated the property to the state for a park. In the early 1960s, all the buildings were removed."


Source:    Information sign, Mitchell Point, November 2014.


[More]

Image, 2014, Info sign detail, Mitchell Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Detail, information sign, Cabins, Gas Station, and Roadhouse, Mitchell Point, Oregon. Image taken November 10, 2014.
Image, 2014, Info sign detail, Mitchell Point, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Detail, information sign, Shell Station, Motel, and Roadhouse, Mitchell Point, Oregon. Image taken November 10, 2014.


Multnomah Falls Lodge ...
The Multnomah Falls Lodge is located at Multnomah Falls, Oregon, at Columbia River Mile (RM) 136. It was built in 1925 as an overnight rest area on the Historic Columbia River Highway. Originally the lodge had dormitories and four rooms for the overnight stays. As early as 1927 the building was enlarged, and again in 1929 the striped awning patio gained permanent walls and became part of the building. In 1981 the Multnomah Falls Lodge and Footpath (Benson Bridge) were listed on the National Register of Historic Places (Building #81000512). Every type of rock found in the Columbia River Gorge is represented in the Lodge.
[More]

Penny Postcard, Multnomah Falls, Oregon, ca.1920s Penny Postcard: Multnomah Falls, Oregon, ca.1920s. Penny Postcard, ca.1920s, "Multnomah Falls Lodge, Columbia River Highway, Ore." The striped patio canopy was replaced by a new building section in 1929. Published by The Oregon News Co., Portland, Oregon. Card #170.In the private collection of Lyn Topinka.
Images, 2005, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon. Image taken December 10, 2005.
Images, 2006, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Christmas, Multnomah Falls Lodge, Oregon. Image taken December 23, 2006.


Multnomah Lodge ("Mist Lodge") ...
Multnomah Lodge, often referred to as "Mist Lodge", was one of the many roadhouses which existed along the Historic Columbia River Highway. Multnomah Lodge was located at the base of Mist Falls, just west of Multnomah Falls.


"... Another of the many lodges that formerly served tourists along the highway, Mist Lodge a.k.a. Multnomah Lodge, no longer exists. Located almost directly below Mist Falls, the Lodge roof collapsed from a heavy winter snowfall during the winter of 1920-21. Restored and reopened, it burned to the ground in 1929, and was not rebuilt. ..."

Source:    Clarence E. Mershon, 2001, "East of the Sandy, The Columbia River Highway", Guardian Peaks, Inc., Portland.


"Another facility, Mist Lodge (aka Multnomah Lodge) pre-dated Multnomah Falls Lodge. Built nearly directly below Mist Falls, the structure suffered severe damage from heavy snowfall during the winter of 1920-21. The accumulation of snow caused the lodge roof to collapse. That winter, huge snowdrifts blocked the CRH for several weeks and deep, glacier-like drifts near Oneonta were not entirely cleared until spring. After being restored and reopened, Mist Lodge operated until it burned in 1929. Because of the onset of the Depression, it was not rebuilt. Another restaurant operated in the area for a relatively short time, Mrs. W.J. Gebott owned and managed the Jack-O-Lantern, located near Horsetail Falls."

Source:    Clarence E. Mershon, 2006, "The Columbia River Highway", Guardian Peaks Enterprises, Portland.


MULTNOMAH LODGE
Mrs. M.J. Marston, Proprietor
EXCELLENT DINNERS & LIGHT LUNCHES
QUICK SERVICE, OVERNIGHT ACCOMODATIONS
MODERATE PRICES
SPECIAL ONE DOLLAR LUNCHES
One-half Mile West of Multnomah Falls -- Thirty-five Miles East
of Portland -- Thirty-five Miles West of Hood River



Source:    Advertisement appearing in "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, Published by The Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.

Advertisement, Chanticleer Inn, 1919
Click image to enlarge
Multnomah Lodge, ILLUSTRATION, "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916.
Source: "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, published by Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon.
Image, 2013, Multnomah Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Fireplace and chimney remains, Multnomah Lodge, Mist Falls, Oregon. Multnomah Lodge burned in 1929. The Historic Columbia River Highway is in the foreground. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2013, Multnomah Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Fireplace and chimney remains, Multnomah Lodge, Mist Falls, Oregon. Multnomah Lodge burned in 1929. Image taken February 19, 2013.
Image, 2013, Multnomah Lodge, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Columbia River Highway drain cover, Multnomah Lodge, Mist Falls, Oregon. Multnomah Lodge burned in 1929. Image taken February 19, 2013.


Rapids, Cascade Locks, Oregon ...
The Rapids, located in Cascade Locks, Oregon, contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to be an "official station" for Columbia River Highway travelers.

"... Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete. ..." [Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013]

Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.


Tad's Chicken 'n Dumplins, Troutdale, Oregon ...
Tad's Chicken 'n Dumplins, located on the banks of the Sandy River at Troutdale, was one of the early eateries on the Columbia River Highway.

"Yes, There Really Was a Tad! ...  

Handsome Tad Johnson, known locally as a rascal and a fisherman, (in that order,) opened his roadhouse in the late 1920s at the east end of the Sandy River Bridge. Prohibition was still in effect, the smelt ran free, Bonnie and Clyde made the news and the Historic Columbia River Highway was new then.

This makes Tad's one of the first, and now one of the last, remaining Historic Columbia River Highway roadhouses from that era. To give you some perspective, Tad Johnson's original roadhouse was built just after Multnomah Falls Lodge and a little before Timberline Lodge, making it an important part of the lasting legacy of hospitality in the Columbia River Gorge, the Sandy River Delta and the Mt. Hood Watershed.

The original Tad's was primarily a fish-house, a place to eat fresh, local seafood. The food was simple and regional, perfect for hungry travelers and the new migrants moving into Oregon. As part of that Northwest legacy, we still feature fish and chips and salmon smoked in-house from local Alder trees.

Tad's moved to its current location in the forties. The restaurant added Chicken and Dumplings to the menu and never looked back. After I-84 was built, Tad's was still a local favorite with its dance floor, jukeboxes, lunch counter and later, its open-air patio and full bar. ..."


Source:    Tad's Chicken 'n Dumplins website, 2014.


Image, 2014, Troutdale, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Tad's Chicken-n-Dumplins, on the Sandy River, Troutdale, Oregon. Image taken December 29, 2014.
Image, 2014, Troutdale, Oregon, click to enlarge
Click image to enlarge
Tad's Chicken-n-Dumplins, on the Sandy River, Troutdale, Oregon. Image taken December 29, 2014.


View Point Inn ...
The View Point Inn, once known as "Palmer House", is located on Larch Mountain Road, above Crown Point in the Columbia River Gorge at Columbia River Mile (RM) _____. The Inn overlooks the Gorge and has fantastic views of the Columbia River. The small Oregon community of Corbett is nearby. In 1985 the View Point Inn was added to the National Register of Historic Places (Building #85000367). On sunday, July 10, 2011, sparks from a chimney started a three-alarm fire which damaged the historic View Point Inn, with flames burning through the Inn's cedar shake roof and gutting the top floor. The fire was spotted by two "Twilight" fans, visiting the location of Edward and Bella's prom night in the 2008 movie. As of this early date (a week later) the future of the Inn is unknown.
[More]

Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Sign, View Point Inn, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.
Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
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View Point Inn, Corbett, Oregon. View from Chanticleer Point (Portland Women's Forum). Image taken June 28, 2009.
Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
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View Point Inn, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.
Image, 2009, View Point Inn, Oregon, click to enlarge
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"Twilight" Walk of Fame, "Edward Cullan, Bella Swan, Forever", View Point Inn, Oregon. Image taken June 27, 2009.


Waukoma Hotel, Hood River, Oregon ...
The Waukoma Hotel, built in 1904 and located in Hood River, Oregon, contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to be an "official station" for Columbia River Highway travelers.

"... Dozens of roadhouses sprang up along the highway welcoming weary travelers with crisp linens, cold beverages, hearty meals, and fantastic views. The Rapids in Cascade Locks, the Waukoma Hotel in Hood River, and the Black and White Restaurant in The Dalles contracted with the Oregon Motor Association to act as "official stations" for tourists. Other establishments like the Falls Villa, here at Latourell Falls, and Forest Hall in Bridal Veil served dainty lunches and chicken or salmon dinners to travelers. In addition to respite, some roadhouses also served locally distilled spirits during Prohibition. The quickening pace of life, and construction of a water-grade thoroughfare through the Gorge, rendered many roadhouses obsolete. ..." [Information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon, visited March 2013]

Image, 2013, Detail, Information Sign, Roadhouse Respite, Latourell Falls, Oregon, click to enlarge
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"Roadhouse Respite", detail, information sign, Latourell Falls, Historic Columbia River Highway, Oregon. Image taken March 3, 2013.
Image, 2013, Hood River, Oregon, click to enlarge
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Historic Waucoma Hotel, Hood River, Oregon. View looking north down 2nd Street. Taken from front window of moving car. Image taken March 18, 2013.


Wayfarer Inn, Corbett, Oregon ...
"... Among the jewels of the highway and a focal point for tourists were Vista House and Crown Point. Crown Point is a basaltic promontory of the Columbia Gorge. It was one of the two sites where the highway was dedicated between Troutdale and Hood River in 1916. Atop Crown Point stands the Vista House (1918), an observation point for the Gorge. Vista House was designed by the architect Edgar Lazarus following Samuel Lancaster's suggestion that an observation point be placed at Crown Point.

Famous resort inns such as the Chanticleer Inn on the site of the Portland Women's Forum Park, the Crown Point Chalet above Vista House, the Wayfarer Inn in Corbett, and Faresh Hall in Bridleveil arose to serve the tourists. From Portland, rental touring cars and limousines were available from the Columbia River and City Sightseeing Service to bring tourists to the area. ..."


Source:    National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, View Point Inn, 1985, #85000367.



"The Golden Age of Postcards" ...

The early 1900s was the "Golden Age of Postcards", with the "Penny Postcard" being a popular way to send greetings to family and friends. Today the Penny Postcard has become a snapshot of history.


From the Journals of Lewis and Clark ...

Clark, October 30, 1805 ...
A cool morning, a moderate rain all the last night, after eating a partial brackfast of venison we Set out [from their camp near Drano Lake and the Little White Salmon River]     passed Several places where the rocks projected into the river & have the appearance of haveing Seperated from the mountains and fallen promiscuisly into the river, Small nitches are formed in the banks below those projecting rocks which is comon in this part of the river, Saw 4 Cascades caused by Small Streams falling from the mountains on the Lard. Side,

[The possiblities in a two-mile area are - upstream to downstream - Starvation Creek and Falls, the seasonal Cabin Creek and Falls, Warren Creek and Falls, Wonder Creek and Lancaster Falls, Lindsey Creek and Falls, and Summit Creek and Falls.]

a remarkable circumstance in this part of the river is, the Stumps of pine trees [Submerged Forest]

[The Submerged Forest existed along the reach from above Dog Mountain/Viento Creek on the upstream edge and Wind Mountain/Shellrock Mountain on the downstream edge.]

are in maney places are at Some distance in the river, and gives every appearance of the rivers being damed up below from Some cause which I am not at this time acquainted with [Bonneville Landslide],     the Current of the river is also verry jentle not exceeding 1 1/2 mile pr. hour and about 3/4 of a mile in width. Some rain, we landed above the mouth of a Small river on the Stard. Side [Wind River] and Dined ...   :  here the river widens to about one mile large Sand bar in the middle, a Great [rock] both in and out of the water, large <round> Stones, or rocks are also permiscuisly Scattered about in the river, ...     The bottoms above the mouth of this little river [Wind River] <which we Call> is rich covered with grass & firn & is about 3/4 of a mile wide rich and rises gradually, below the river (which is 60 yards wide above its mouth) the Countery rises with Steep assent. we call this little river <fr Ash> New Timbered river from a Speces of Ash <that wood> which grows on its banks of a verry large and different from any we had before Seen, and a timber resembling the beech in bark <& groth> but different in its leaf which is Smaller and the tree smaller. passed maney large rocks in the river and a large creek on the Stard. Side in the mouth of which is an Island [Rock Creek near Stevenson, Washington], passed on the right of 3 Islands <on> near the Stard. Side, and landed on an Island close under the Stard. Side at the head of the great Shute [head of the Cascades Rapids], and a little below a village of 8 large houses on a Deep bend on the Stard. Side, and opposit 2 Small Islands imediately in the head of the Shute, which Islands are covered with Pine, maney large rocks also, in the head of the Shute. Ponds back of the houses, and Countrey low for a Short distance. The day proved Cloudy dark and disagreeable with Some rain all day which kept us wet. The Countary a high mountain on each Side thickly Covered with timber, Such as Spruc, Pine, Cedar, Oake Cotton &c. &c.     I took two men and walked down three miles to examine the Shute and river below proceeded along an old Indian path, passd. an old village at 1 mile [vicinity of Ice House Lake] ...     I found by examonation that we must make a portage of the greater perpotion of our Stores 2 1/2 miles, and the Canoes we Could haul over the rocks, I returned at Dark ...     a wet disagreeable evening, the only wood we could get to burn on this little Island on which we have encamped [near Ashes Lake, the island is now under the waters of the Bonneville Reservoir. Ashes Lake was near the head of the Cascade Rapids. Across from Ashes Lake is Cascade Locks, Oregon.] is the newly discovered Ash, which makes a tolerable fire. we made fifteen miles to daye






Clark, April 13, 1806 ...
The loss of one of our large Canoes rendered it necessary to divide the loading and men of that Canoe between the remaining four, which was done and we loaded and Set out at 8 oClock A. M. [from their camp near Ashes Lake]     passed the village imediately above the rapids where only one house remains entire the other 8 haveing been taken down and moved to the opposit Side of the Columbia [downstream of Rock Creek and Stevenson, Washington] ...     Capt. Lewis with 2 of the Smallest Canoes of Sergt. Pryor & gibson and Crossed above the Rapids [Cascade Rapids] to the Village on the S E Side [east of Cascade Locks] with a view to purchase a Canoe of the nativs if possible. ...     I with the two large Canoes proceeded on up the N. W. Side with the intention of gitting to the Encampment of our hunters who was derected to hunt in the bottom above Crusats River [Wind River], and there wait the arrival of Capt. Lewis. I proceeded on to the bottom in which I expected to find the hunters but Could See nothing of them. the wind rose and raised the wavs to Such a hight that I could not proceed any further. we landed and I sent out Shields and Colter to hunt; Shields Shot two deer but Could get neither of them. I walkd. to Crusats river [Wind River] and up it Ĺ a mile on my return to the party found that the wind had lulled and as we Could See nothing of our hunters. I deturmined to proceed on to the next bottom where I thought it probable they had halted at Ĺ passed 2 P M Set out and proceeded on to the bottom 6 miles and halted at the next bottom formed a Camp and Sent out all the hunters [near Dog Mountain, between Collins Creek and Dog Creek].     I also walked out my self on the hills but saw nothing. on my return found Capt. Lewis at Camp with two canoes which he had purchased at the Y-ep-huh ...

I was convinced that the hunters must have been up River Cruzatt [Wind River]. despatched Sergt. Pryor with 2 men in a Canoe, with directions to assend Crusats River [Wind River] and if he found the hunters to assist them in with the meat. Jo: Shields returned about Sunset with two deer which he had killed, those were of the Black tail fallow Deer. <the> there appears to be no other Species of Deer in those mountains. We proceeded on 12 miles.





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*River Miles [RM] are approximate, in statute miles, and were determined from USGS topo maps, obtained from NOAA nautical charts, or obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers website, 2003

Sources:    Mershon, C.E., 2006, The Columbia River Highway, From the Sea to the Wheat Fields of Eastern Oregon, Guardian Peaks Enterprises, Portland;    "PDXHistory.com" website, 2006;    Western Waters Digital Library, 2014; "Official Columbia Highway Tour", 1916, Scenic Tours Company, Portland, Oregon;   

All Lewis and Clark quotations from Gary Moulton editions of the Lewis and Clark Journals, University of Nebraska Press, all attempts have been made to type the quotations exactly as in the Moulton editions, however typing errors introduced by this web author cannot be ruled out; location interpretation from variety of sources, including this website author.
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March 2015